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Ubuntu Desires Lower Audio Latency For Gaming

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  • #61
    Originally posted by Lynxeye View Post
    Can you really tell the latency between the pianist triggering the string and you hearing it?
    YES, if you are the pianist.

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by RealNC View Post
      Hardware mixing doesn't work. Why? Because my hardware doesn't do mixing. So how can it work?

      Yeah, I'm joking. Point is, the hw mixing argument is just an excuse for shitty sw mixing implementations. In the age of dual core CPUs being the low end, not being able to do proper audio mixing sounds more like a bad joke to me.

      no, you certainly are again in stupid mode.

      Hardware mixing is the answer. It is not ALSA's or PA's fault if YOU choose to buy SHIT. That's it. No excuses. You bought crap and now you are whining around.

      Originally posted by Ancurio View Post
      I don't regard dmix as part of core ALSA because it is a plugin. And it was developed as an afterthought hack due to the problems posed by pure ALSA.
      except that ALSA were meant to have plugins from the start. dmix was introduced because people are buying crap and then complain.

      See RealNC as an example.

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by RealNC View Post
        Is there a "defaults.pcm.dmix.*" option for this? I'd like to try it and see whether audio skipping becomes a problem with smaller buffers.
        It's the period_size and buffer_size parameters on the slave PCM. Some examples on this page: http://alsa.opensrc.org/Dmix. Official docs here: http://www.alsa-project.org/main/ind.../Asoundrc#dmix and here: http://www.alsa-project.org/alsa-doc...m_plugins_dmix

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by Hamish Wilson View Post
          And I never had any audio stuttering with PulseAudio, and I hardly have the worlds most powerful setup.
          I changed the audio system to OSSv4.2 because of the audio stuttering with PulseAudio. I have Dual Core 4400+ 64 bit Athlon so it's much more powerful then Sempron and PA in my use case gives horrible results. Also PulseAudio on Ubuntu already have the high priority.

          I'm regularly compiling new versions of Wine on Ubuntu and I have Chrome opened with many tabs and gmusicbrowser playing music. The processor cores are at 100% usage all the time through compilation and most of the RAM is in use. In this case audio stutters with PA so badly that I can't stand it, while when OSSv4.2 is in use I get zero stutters and audio is crystal clear. That's why I always remove ALSA and PA from Ubuntu (unfortunately I can't purge all of the PA).

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by energyman View Post
            no, you certainly are again in stupid mode.

            Hardware mixing is the answer. It is not ALSA's or PA's fault if YOU choose to buy SHIT. That's it. No excuses. You bought crap and now you are whining around.



            except that ALSA were meant to have plugins from the start. dmix was introduced because people are buying crap and then complain.

            See RealNC as an example.
            Yeah sure. A Xonar D1 is crap while a Creative Recon3D is so l33t. Are you insane?

            The only thing HW mixing is an answer to is crappy SW mixers.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by RealNC View Post
              The only thing HW mixing is an answer to is crappy SW mixers.
              no, you would be wrong. H/W mixing is very useful ~ you just aren't someone that needs it. You would have a completely different outlook, if you wanted/needed things like zero-latency monitoring, or things like being able to control the ratio of the mix vs. monitoring.

              to claim HW mixing is an answer to crappy SW mixers is, welll..... moronic. Your better off saying that HW mixing just ins't something you need for your particular usage, instead of saying it's useless (considering the vast majority of audio interfaces - ie: proaudio AD/DA convertors boast HW mixing - including every single interface i've purchased over the last decade).

              cheerz

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              • #67
                Originally posted by ninez View Post
                H/W mixing is very useful
                Is there some sound card with
                - HW mixing
                - headphone amp
                - replacable op-amps
                - supported by Linux
                - price less than $200
                ?

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by ninez View Post
                  no, you would be wrong. H/W mixing is very useful ~ you just aren't someone that needs it. You would have a completely different outlook, if you wanted/needed things like zero-latency monitoring, or things like being able to control the ratio of the mix vs. monitoring.

                  to claim HW mixing is an answer to crappy SW mixers is, welll..... moronic. Your better off saying that HW mixing just ins't something you need for your particular usage, instead of saying it's useless (considering the vast majority of audio interfaces - ie: proaudio AD/DA convertors boast HW mixing - including every single interface i've purchased over the last decade).
                  Keep in mind that we're talking about playing video games, watching videos and listening to MP3s here. HW mixing is certainly not required for that.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by unix_epoch View Post
                    It's the period_size and buffer_size parameters on the slave PCM. Some examples on this page: http://alsa.opensrc.org/Dmix. Official docs here: http://www.alsa-project.org/main/ind.../Asoundrc#dmix and here: http://www.alsa-project.org/alsa-doc...m_plugins_dmix
                    Isn't there an API for this thing? Having to configure text files each time I want to change just doesn't cut it, IMO. This is stuff that should be configurable at runtime. Things like that is what make me believe that ALSA should be called LSA instead.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                      Keep in mind that we're talking about playing video games, watching videos and listening to MP3s here. HW mixing is certainly not required for that.
                      keep in mind that when i said " H/W mixing is very useful ~ you just aren't someone that needs it" - that is exactly what i was implying. regardless, PA is pretty shotty and given the option, i would rather have HW mixing, myself (even in the scenario's listed above).

                      Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                      Isn't there an API for this thing? Having to configure text files each time I want to change just doesn't cut it, IMO. This is stuff that should be configurable at runtime. Things like that is what make me believe that ALSA should be called LSA instead.
                      can you give a real-world example where you would constantly be needing to change these settings?? (i ask, because i can't think of any practical reason, really). Also, many ALSA applications allow you to adjust ALSA's settings (for that app), if they have an audio/sound dialog.

                      Typically though, i don't spend any time in any OS, changing my audio preferences around - on a daily, monthly or even yearly basis... The idea is you set it up and shouldn't have to go back changing things, unless you've decided you don't like something, or there is a particular application that has different needs (which in those cases, the app probably lets you change audio settings, anyway).

                      Originally posted by JS987 View Post
                      Is there some sound card with
                      - HW mixing
                      - headphone amp
                      - replacable op-amps
                      - supported by Linux
                      - price less than $200
                      ?
                      probably, but i'm not wasting my time researching that for you, when you are perfectly capable of using google / visiting sites like FFADO.org or the ALSA:Matrix to find a card that is supported.... I will say though, if you don't mind spending just a little more than $200 (like $275 or find something used at that price or slightly lower) there are certainly options. For example, the other week i bought a small/more portable firewire audio interface for $275 CDN (brand-new), which was the Presonus: Firestudio Mobile (8-in / 6-out @96khz), plus it has a bunch of other useful features and is well-supported in FFADO (plug and play, no problems at all, works great).

                      cheerz
                      Last edited by ninez; 11-03-2012, 01:06 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by ninez View Post
                        probably, but i'm not wasting my time researching that for you, when you are perfectly capable of using google / visiting sites like FFADO.org or the ALSA:Matrix to find a card that is supported.... I will say though, if you don't mind spending just a little more than $200 (like $275 or find something used at that price or slightly lower) there are certainly options. For example, the other week i bought a small/more portable firewire audio interface for $275 CDN (brand-new), which was the Presonus: Firestudio Mobile (8-in / 6-out @96khz), plus it has a bunch of other useful features and is well-supported in FFADO (plug and play, no problems at all, works great).
                        only 96 kHz
                        only 300 mW at 60 Ohm headphone output
                        no replaceable op-amps
                        some security problem with FireWire
                        it isn't available in my town

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by JS987 View Post
                          only 96 kHz
                          only 300 mW at 60 Ohm headphone output
                          no replaceable op-amps
                          some security problem with FireWire
                          it isn't available in my town
                          96khz is fine for what i am using it for, nor would i be concerned about replaceable op-amps... but really (and i think you know this...!) My purchase was really just an example - or in my case, suited for a particular use (which is NOT to use headphones, but instead through my PA and/or amplifier. I'm not sure about the 'security problem' with firewire ~ but *please* do post a citation (that is recent and can be verified) because you probably wouldn't want to be unintentionally be spreading FUD, if it turned out to _not_ be the case. ( I myself, am not sure on that point... ) But regardless, (supported) firewire audio interfaces are very reliable with my linux/jackified systems, as having owned a few devices over the years - very reliable operation, everytime (and obviously, PCI cards that are supported, of quality design work very well, too.) .

                          Regardless, you may have to do some looking around aka: research... or even possibly order a device (which a store should be able to do for you - in most cases a down payment is usually required...). Obviously, there are other ways of getting what you want like ordering it online, whether that be right from the manufacturer, used/new on sites like ebay ... There are options anyway, so look into it...

                          I bought the presonus because of light weight / small (but rigid design) and mainly for live-use, so 96khz is totally fine...it's also much nicer to bring around ~ since it's not a heavy expense to replace (ie: i don't want to shuffle around my RME). I also don't need to be able to input more than 6 - 1/4 inch cables at once and the 2 front panel preamps (XLR or 1/4) have decent headroom and sound pristine/decent for the price/class of device.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by ninez View Post
                            if you don't mind spending just a little more than $200 (like $275 or find something used at that price or slightly lower) there are certainly options. For example, the other week i bought a small/more portable firewire audio interface for $275 CDN (brand-new), which was the Presonus: Firestudio Mobile (8-in / 6-out @96khz), plus it has a bunch of other useful features and is well-supported in FFADO (plug and play, no problems at all, works great).

                            cheerz
                            Just why would an average user spend that amount of money on a sound card? It's just not something that's justifiable. In addition, aside from the cost, firewire isn't the most common interface available. It's usually going to be pci or pci express if it's not built in. Hardware mixing is just something that isn't available on most people's computers.

                            This is an internet forum. I believe that such things should be used to share knowledge and information, not to engage in ideological wars, such as I see so bloody often. Pulseaudio bad, Ubuntu bad, Alsa good, hardware mixing good, etc, etc. Such a misuse of the net.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by ninez View Post
                              96khz is fine for what i am using it for, nor would i be concerned about replaceable op-amps...
                              Different people have different needs. Onboard sound cards and my discrete sound card support 192 kHz. That $235 sound card has some crappy parts if it supports only 96 kHz.
                              HW mixing can be advantage in some cases, but it isn't option in many cases. If I would have to buy new sound card tomorrow I would still buy sound card without HW mixing because there is no reasonable priced card with HW mixing
                              which provides high quality sound to my headphones, which is most important to me. Using two sound cards is unacceptable because it isn't possible to connect one headphones to two sound cards at same time.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by JS987 View Post
                                Different people have different needs. Onboard sound cards and my discrete sound card support 192 kHz. That $235 sound card has some crappy parts if it supports only 96 kHz.
                                Or it's not a matter of crappy parts, but their choice/design to be 96khz. You want to talk about crappy parts, IntelHDAs - crap! straight up. My presonus isn't as good as my RME (which afaik does 192khz), but again, i don't need the presonus to support that - but what i do need (which NO discrete card does!) is have multi-in/out (being able to record/feed-in-live multiple signals), 1/4 + XLR connections + 48v phantom power, proper preamps, H/w mixing and the soundcard needs to be able to keep up to whatever is thrown at it, which your discrete card would never be able to do.

                                Originally posted by Redshirt001 View Post
                                HW mixing can be advantage in some cases, but it isn't option in many cases. If I would have to buy new sound card tomorrow I would still buy sound card without HW mixing because there is no reasonable priced card with HW mixing
                                which provides high quality sound to my headphones, which is most important to me. Using two sound cards is unacceptable because it isn't possible to connect one headphones to two sound cards at same time.
                                which just means, you have very basic needs in terms of sound on a computer - and thus can't justify spending money on that sort of thing. Myself, i have no problem spending a bit of money and do feel justified in purchasing soundcards that are more expensive (i mean the presonus is a fraction of the cost of my RME- but obviously, the RME is much more powerful / higher grade).

                                Originally posted by Redshirt001 View Post
                                Just why would an average user spend that amount of money on a sound card? It's just not something that's justifiable. In addition, aside from the cost, firewire isn't the most common interface available. It's usually going to be pci or pci express if it's not built in. Hardware mixing is just something that isn't available on most people's computers.
                                $200-300 is not some huge expense from my perspective (like a small fraction of a weeks pay). and FYI firewire is HUGELY common for soundcards (that are multi-channel in/out and have connections for things like 1/4 and XLR) on any operating system. If you actually do your home work, you will see that in reality, USB2.0, FIrewire are as common as PCI sound devices, if not more so. and both USB2.0 and Firewire are certainly more common than PCI/e soundcards.
                                Last edited by ninez; 11-04-2012, 07:47 AM.

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