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Ubuntu Unity Proves Very Slow To KDE, GNOME, Xfce, LXDE

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  • #16
    I was answered by Martin and he states that the results coming from this kind of tests are no relevant as "the difference is too low, it's performed on just one hardware, just one distribution, there is no indication about how often the tests have been performed and so on. The benchmark is saying exactly nothing."

    https://plus.google.com/115606635748...ts/YSRDPgeV8vE

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    • #17
      Compiz, Mutter and xfce fullscreen detection mechanisms sometimes won't identify the application running at fullscreen, so it thinks that the game is running in a window, and doesn't suspend the effects.

      Cube2 or supertuxkart are some examples of games that are properly detected as a fullscreen game and effects are disabled by the compositor, making the game run with fullspeed and proper vsync.

      Trine 2 for example is a problematic game that only kwin runs flawlessly with the suspend fullscreen effects enabled. Mutter, compiz, xfce won't work very good with it.

      I run Xubuntu 12.10, and I spot that problem right away when I see screen tearing. Disabling the compositor fix it.

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      • #18
        I wonder why the full screen tweaks actually works. Since there is no more desktop to render, hence nothing to decorate, reason says there should be no performance penalty in the first place.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by simongaiteiro View Post
          I wouldn't call that "to tweak KDE". You only need to check an option in system configuration.
          Well, the same is true for Xfce. What would you call it?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by narciso View Post
            Compiz, Mutter and xfce fullscreen detection mechanisms sometimes won't identify the application running at fullscreen, so it thinks that the game is running in a window, and doesn't suspend the effects.

            Cube2 or supertuxkart are some examples of games that are properly detected as a fullscreen game and effects are disabled by the compositor, making the game run with fullspeed and proper vsync.

            Trine 2 for example is a problematic game that only kwin runs flawlessly with the suspend fullscreen effects enabled. Mutter, compiz, xfce won't work very good with it.

            I run Xubuntu 12.10, and I spot that problem right away when I see screen tearing. Disabling the compositor fix it.

            Very good point. I'm wondering if what we are seeing is a problem with full-screen detection in these DE's. It has been rumored, that Mutter disables compositing effects when full-screen apps are detected. Anyone know if this is really the case? If so, I would expect performance to be very similar to Kwin with suspended effects.

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            • #21
              Wonder how a stand-alone Openbox or Awesome WM Setup would compete.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by bug77 View Post
                I wonder why the full screen tweaks actually works. Since there is no more desktop to render, hence nothing to decorate, reason says there should be no performance penalty in the first place.
                Normally, a window writes into an offscreen framebuffer of the size of the window, which is later copied onto the screen at the position of the window. If the compositor can properly detect a fullscreen window, it can skip the copying and render to the screen directly. It's only the copying that makes the difference.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Thaodan View Post
                  KDE works flawless with Dual-Monitor: my System http://www.sysprofile.de/id123113.
                  Sorry, I should have verbalized my question properly.
                  What I actually wanted to know is if KDE can suspend desktop effects for better performance, how does it look like if you have a game like HoN running in fullscreen on the primary monitor while the secondary monitor handles the desktop? Does it still suspends desktop effects and how does using the desktop on the secondary monitor feels like?

                  Thank you for an answer nevertheless.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Kakarott View Post
                    Wasn't L4D2 faster on Ubuntu than on Windows?
                    Didn't that Ubuntu use Unity? [http://blogs.valvesoftware.com/linux.../#comment-4328]

                    Just imagine a "KDE SC 4.9 - Suspended" so much more frames per second
                    last time i got a talk with a valve guy they was not working with unity but gnome 2.3x on ubuntu 10.10 xD

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Thaodan View Post
                      KDE works flawless with Dual-Monitor: my System http://www.sysprofile.de/id123113.
                      He didn't talk about KDE itself not working with dual head, but the suspend feature. And I believe it's pretty obvious what he means. If you use dual head, use a fullscreen window in one screen. Then, if you choose to suspend effects when fullscreen, you have the other head without visual effects as well, giving you a less appealing desktop. If you choose to not suspend, well, you get the Unity-like performance in the fullscreen app. Beats me what should happen if using two fullscreen apps, one in each screen.

                      Originally posted by bmoez View Post
                      should valve work with unity/compiz-team to help them improving the perfermance of unity/compiz?
                      that will affect so much their gaming experience on linux/ubuntu
                      Why should they? Be happy they support the OS, I don't think they help Microsoft improving Aero.

                      Originally posted by bug77 View Post
                      I wonder why the full screen tweaks actually works. Since there is no more desktop to render, hence nothing to decorate, reason says there should be no performance penalty in the first place.
                      Because of how compositing works. When using a compositor, you use a buffer for every window, and usually update the content of them all (I'm not completely sure of how this is done, though). This is actually needed for most of the effects, since some of them interacts with the window behind (translucency and shadows, for example). This means you work with the windows which are not being displayed too, so no desktop to render becomes false.

                      Originally posted by marek View Post
                      Normally, a window writes into an offscreen framebuffer of the size of the window, which is later copied onto the screen at the position of the window. If the compositor can properly detect a fullscreen window, it can skip the copying and render to the screen directly. It's only the copying that makes the difference.
                      I assume you know more than I know, since I'm just an amateur reader. Doesn't it use a painter's algorithm? Doesn't the fullscreen mode also allow you to avoid that too?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Kakarott View Post
                        Wasn't L4D2 faster on Ubuntu than on Windows?
                        Didn't that Ubuntu use Unity? [http://blogs.valvesoftware.com/linux.../#comment-4328]

                        Just imagine a "KDE SC 4.9 - Suspended" so much more frames per second
                        Exactly. I'd love to see benchmarks with KDE compared to OS X and Windows.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by mrugiero View Post
                          If you use dual head, use a fullscreen window in one screen. Then, if you choose to suspend effects when fullscreen, you have the other head without visual effects as well, giving you a less appealing desktop. If you choose to not suspend, well, you get the Unity-like performance in the fullscreen app. Beats me what should happen if using two fullscreen apps, one in each screen.
                          That's not how it works. Only the full screen window and windows beneath it lose the composition and it doesn't seem to affect the other screen at all. I'm doing that all the time because the only way I can get tear free video on my external monior is by using MPlayer without compositing with VDPAU output . I'm not sure how it affects performance though.
                          Last edited by Teho; 09-07-2012, 02:21 PM.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Teho View Post
                            That's not how it works. Only the full screen window and windows beneath it lose the composition and it doesn't seem to affect the other screen at all. I'm doing that all the time because the only way I can get tear free video on my external monior is by using MPlayer without compositing with VDPAU output . I'm not sure how it affects performance though.
                            Well, then, that's what the guy (and I) wanted to know. Do you happen to know how is it done?

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                            • #29
                              I love the screencap of the new Ubuntu login session scrolling right off the screen. I'm serious when I say: I don't think they test this stuff.

                              So can we conclude that Cinnamon would be similar to GNOME Shell in terms of performance?

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by mrugiero View Post
                                Well, then, that's what the guy (and I) wanted to know. Do you happen to know how is it done?
                                Nope. I guess you could ask "mgraesslin" who is the lead developer of KWin and made a post in the "KDE's KWin To Receive Performance Improvements" topic.

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