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KDE No Longer Competitive? Developer Calls It Quits

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  • #31
    Originally posted by devius View Post
    That's my experience as well, but what about this bug that has a bunch of duplicates (with new ones appearing regularly) and it took 1 year and a half to change from Unconfirmed to New? It's a crash and apparently no one gives a damn. And before someone says "why don't you fix it then?" I would try to if I was still using KDE, but I got fed up with all the bugs/crashes/graphical artifacts/glitches and apps requiring that I waste 5 minutes configuring them before being able to use them.

    Actually when I was still using KDE I thought that Dolphin was an awesome file manager. Unless it got worse recently I don't understand all the bad rep.
    Don't mind the change from unconfirmed to new. I thread both status as bugs. I'm sure others don't care about that one either.
    As for fixing bugs which aren't crashes and ones that are. I personally hardly ever look at crash bugs, i usually look at the "easier and smaller" bugs since that's simply more fun for me. Crashes can be quite painful to trace and fix.

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    • #32
      If you read Peter's blog entry, he's more or less stepping down from the dolphin project manager position. He still can contribute, but at his own leisure. Also there are other competent Devs there to keep up the good works.

      Apart from direct file name editing, which I hear is coming in KDE 4.9, then Dolphin is the best file manager out there.
      Last edited by e8hffff; 06-26-2012, 02:48 PM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by devius View Post
        That's my experience as well, but what about [URL="https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=251871"]...

        Actually when I was still using KDE I thought that Dolphin was an awesome file manager. Unless it got worse recently I don't understand all the bad rep.
        Default kde file manager was konqueror, which is still superior to dolphin(konqueror is quite useless as web browser, but best feature rich file manager for kde). I always replace dolphin with konqueror as default file manager.

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        • #34
          KDE was and stays the most functional desktop environment for Linux. Quite a shame he left, really. :/

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          • #35
            In my experience, KDE has been getting more and more polished with every release. In fact, the last time I upgraded Amarok gained a silver icon to match the themes of the rest, and I hear the next release has unified tooltips... And that's just a few small, but very noticeable things. That said, it does always have some odd quirks, such as the quick launch buttons that disappear each time I install a new program, and that reappear whenever I open the taskbar settings and hit 'apply'... But then the system is so modular that it's to be expected. The stability has been getting better all the time, too. So I'm quite happy with it.

            I never really liked GNOME that much, as to me version 2 feels like XFCE with unnecessary bloat; haven't tried version 3 yet since I don't really have any reason to. Unity has horrible control just to be different. XFCE is my second favourite for whenever I need a lightweight environment. So I never tried LXDE due to the same thing - there is no reason to. And, well, IceWM has too few configuration options. While TWM is pretty cool for whenever you feel like time travelling. So yeap, I'll stay with KDE, thank you very much.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by tuke81 View Post
              Default kde file manager was konqueror, which is still superior to dolphin(konqueror is quite useless as web browser, but best feature rich file manager for kde). I always replace dolphin with konqueror as default file manager.
              Yea, personally I don't see why they changed that. I never saw anything wrong with Konqueror. But then Dolphin isn't too bad either, even though I'm not a fan of the recent "button to reveal the menu" approach, which feels like taken from MS Office 2007+... And recent Firefoxes did that too...

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Teho View Post
                It's quite easy to do with KMix but for Veromix plasmoid is absolutely fantastic for managin audio outputs. It supports most of the PulseAudio functionality and probably more than any other GUI frontend available. In nine times out of ten changing settings in KDE is easier than in Gnome because they aren't hidden. The problem with that is that the ammount of different settings might get bit overwhelming.
                KMix and Veromix may be just awesome, but there was no getting it to pipe audio through the HDMI cable. We dug through sound systems for two hours trying and applying settings to no effect. We took the "engineer's solution" route and killed the problem by installing an alternate distro with the GNOME3 environment, where audio just worked out of the box (Mint 13 with KDE to Mint 13 with GNOME, if you care to know). It wasn't an overabundance of settings that caused the problem - KDE simply failed us. We were under PulseAudio in both distros, and the exact same thing which worked under GNOME didn't do squat in KDE. That's a problem, and I'm frankly amazed that the desktop environment was causing it. Two hours of trying to get something as basic as audio piped to the correct port is more than a fair shake, I'd say.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Temar View Post
                  THIS

                  I've been a KDE User since 1.x as well and I'm sick and tired of waiting for a stable KDE desktop. Each release brings new bugs and most of the time many regressions as well. The QA of many KDE projects just sucks and due to the lack of a release manager who is willing to delay the release or even revert some applications back to a previous version, KDE will always be buggy.

                  Stability has always been more important than features but it seems KDE will never understand that.
                  Indeed, as you said, as a KDE user since 4.0 I keep looking forward to the next release, because this or that bug got fixed in trunk and is only scheduled for the next release. I install the next release, and new things are broken. It's a pity that you keep feeling the urge to upgrade KDE not because you are happy with you desktop and want those awesome new features, but because something very annoying is broken, and you know/hope they are fixed now.

                  And then you need to upgrade your distro because many distros don't maintain current KDE versions for older versions. And then the cycle restarts.

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                  • #39
                    All I have to say is that I won´t be able to function without KDE.

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                    • #40
                      It's sad, because KDE is the best DE ever made. However, Ubuntu and Unity are in the best position to gain significant market share. They're both made by the same company and in the result everything should play nice together. In the long run Fedora and Gnome also seems to become interesting, but default GS sucks and Fedora isn't so good for noobs right now. I wish A. Seigo and the rest from KDE camp to join Canonical.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Larian View Post
                        We were under PulseAudio in both distros, and the exact same thing which worked under GNOME didn't do squat in KDE. That's a problem, and I'm frankly amazed that the desktop environment was causing it.
                        It didn't. There are very few parts in the desktop environment that has anything to do with your audio. Basicly if you have PulseAudio installed then the only thing that matters in that situation is the mixer interface that you are using. Of course there could be bugs in either KMix or Veromix or your distribution might have packaged them badly. Veromix should list all your audio outputs and changing the output is as easy as draggin the application under the ouput you want to use. But then again you could use the same mixer that Gnome or any other desktop environment is using in KDE without any problems.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Larian View Post
                          KMix and Veromix may be just awesome, but there was no getting it to pipe audio through the HDMI cable. We dug through sound systems for two hours trying and applying settings to no effect. We took the "engineer's solution" route and killed the problem by installing an alternate distro with the GNOME3 environment, where audio just worked out of the box (Mint 13 with KDE to Mint 13 with GNOME, if you care to know). It wasn't an overabundance of settings that caused the problem - KDE simply failed us. We were under PulseAudio in both distros, and the exact same thing which worked under GNOME didn't do squat in KDE. That's a problem, and I'm frankly amazed that the desktop environment was causing it. Two hours of trying to get something as basic as audio piped to the correct port is more than a fair shake, I'd say.
                          that is not kde fault per se, for experience with my cambridge speakers in many distros FFMPEG/Pulseaudio/GStreamer combo is a bloody mess (K/ubuntu especially) plus KDE sometimes is just crappy implemented in some distros (K/ubuntu again). so all this togheter became a real mess to fix.

                          so when dealing with ubuntu variants is better to recompile your stack from git (ffmpeg/pulseaudio/gstreamer) manually including the kernel and that fix must of the issues or migrate to more KDE friendly distros like opensuse/sabayon/arch/gentoo

                          the same is true for KDE per se, somehow KDE in kubuntu is really buggy and is very crashyish but when you switch to sabayon/gentoo/arch/opensuse it rarely fails(at least for me), so it seems that ubuntu variants distro just care about of gnome when they ninja crappy patch/nerf many packages and just leave KDE in the air(kde network manager in kubuntu how much white hair you gived me?)

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                          • #43
                            I'm using kde 4.9 beta 2 and it still has the problem that the windowbar plasmoid often has problems shifting the window entries to the left and even displays two entries at the same place. That's not a new problem with the beta. That has been there for a long time and just looks bad.

                            Also its applications are pretty slow.
                            Just try
                            Code:
                            thunar& dolphin&
                            twice so everything is in the cache. I understand that dolphin does more than thunar but it's a file manager! The times I only use it to select and open a file I really feel the delay in contrast to thunar opening almost immediately.

                            About the bugs... There are many and for some lesser bugs it seems to be the same as in gnome. They sit in the bugtracker forever and receive no attention at all.

                            Consider this bug from 2010 https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=255183 that got re-reported about a year later https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=285434
                            It's functionality advertised in Kontact that just never works.

                            akregator still segfaults occassionally just sitting idle in the tray, probably while receiving new articles, who knows. For SMBC it receives the entries twice most of the time. It also leaks entries from other feeds into the feed of fefes blog.

                            It has countless of these minor bugs that are not really blockers but all in all leave a bad impression.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by markg85 View Post
                              I invite you to go to the KDE forum and post your suggestion to improve System Settings. You can go here http://forum.kde.org/viewforum.php?f...d1a3f1effb66a0 and make a thread or look in a already existing thread to improve system settings like this one: http://forum.kde.org/viewtopic.php?f=226&t=101206
                              i think there have been proposal both in the workspace vision and in the brainstorm section, but nobody picked them up.
                              I guess that it's a boring job and no one is really interested into doing.

                              Going back on topic: i've used KDE since 2.0 . I never liked too much Gnome and Unity, but i also have to say that i'm getting less enthusiast about kde because the small bugs which don't get fixed.

                              In my opinion they should focus on usability. For example: why do i have to run dolphin to search for a file and i can't do it through a plasmoid in the menu bar (as apple's spotlight)?

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by jrch2k8 View Post
                                that is not kde fault per se, for experience with my cambridge speakers in many distros FFMPEG/Pulseaudio/GStreamer combo is a bloody mess (K/ubuntu especially) plus KDE sometimes is just crappy implemented in some distros.
                                Well, it's that crappy implementation which renders it positively alien and undesirable to someone who's used Gnome since 2006. Yes, I'm biased toward Gnome 2 and I know and realize that I'm biased due to my long experience and familiarity with it. I'll own that one so we can get to the truth. But these problems really are deal breakers for new users (which my friend is.)

                                A few distributions have abandoned KDE lately and I think we should ask ourselves why that is the case. I get Canonical wanting to push Unity (Which behaves remarkably like Gnome 3), but what about the others? There has to be a reason for the exodus we're seeing. Is it the bugs? Maybe it's not being able to get the damned thing to behave without spending a couple of days beating your head against a wall due to shoddy implementations? Not sure. But a "poor implementation" is indistinguishable from a broken product, wouldn't you say?

                                This is not to say that Gnome isn't equally broken, but I'm used to the Gnome flavor of broken to the point I can't see it anymore unless someone points it out.

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