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  • CodeWeavers Is Working On A New Web Browser

    Phoronix: CodeWeavers Is Working On A New Web Browser

    CodeWeavers, the company behind the popular Wine-based CrossOver software for running Windows-based games and office software on Linux and Mac OS X, is preparing to release some sort of new web browser...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTA5NDY

  • #2
    ActiveX is evil ... let it die.

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    • #3
      cb88 is a crackpot ... let it die.

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      • #4
        Can someone explain better? I do have at work some intranet "websites" that only work with Internet Explorer 6 (yes, you read that). Does this mean Crossover will release some sort of Chromium (a native linux client) that will have "embedded" IE6+7 support?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bulletxt View Post
          Can someone explain better? I do have at work some intranet "websites" that only work with Internet Explorer 6 (yes, you read that). Does this mean Crossover will release some sort of Chromium (a native linux client) that will have "embedded" IE6+7 support?
          The newsletter wasn't specific enough, but my guess is that it won't be a native Linux client. The entire solution will more than likely be based on wine, rather than having a native renderer with an ActiveX container running in an emulator.

          Now that you mention it, though, that doesn't sound like an extremely bad idea. Still, I'm betting it'll run on a wine emulation of the Microsoft Trident rendering engine. They might make the GUI trimmings in native somehow (like how Chrome separates out the trimmings and the content pane) but I would be surprised if the rendering engine isn't Microsoft Trident.

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          • #6
            Would that be legal (running Trident outside of a legitimate Windows installation)?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by aceman View Post
              Would that be legal (running Trident outside of a legitimate Windows installation)?
              If you have a Windows operating system license for a version of Windows that supports the same version of Internet Explorer -- yes.

              There's been a fair bit of study by companies (including CodeWeavers) about the legality of running Microsoft's runtimes outside of Windows. The general consensus is that it's fine as long as you can run those same binaries under a Windows license that is licensed to the computer you're using. So all you have to do is either buy an OEM computer that comes with an already-activated copy of Windows, or else, install Windows, activate it, then uninstall it and run Linux with Wine, and you should be good to go.

              IANAL and this is just community advice that's been passed around, but the legal hand-me-downs from the free software community -- especially when their origins stem from the larger corporations like Red Hat or the organizations like the FSF -- instill me with more confidence than casual speculation.

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              • #8
                OK, but then it must be made clear this is not a way to get rid of Windows (I mean purchasing a Windows license) just for running IE.

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                • #9
                  I find it extremely unlikely that they would use triden for this.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by allquixotic View Post
                    There's been a fair bit of study by companies (including CodeWeavers) about the legality of running Microsoft's runtimes outside of Windows. The general consensus is that it's fine as long as you can run those same binaries under a Windows license that is licensed to the computer you're using. So all you have to do is either buy an OEM computer that comes with an already-activated copy of Windows, or else, install Windows, activate it, then uninstall it and run Linux with Wine, and you should be good to go.
                    thats the sweet dream of Microsoft pay for a windows license if you wana use linux... LOL and even better you have to pay for patents to!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by aceman View Post
                      Would that be legal (running Trident outside of a legitimate Windows installation)?
                      Yes. They wrote all the code themselves, or their "partner" did. All 100% legal reverse engineering. Just like samba to smb :P
                      Secondly: The reason its legal is also because this is not trident, its something that is compitable with trident.

                      The entire "point" of this idea is basically to get a software that can access all those pesky Active X sites, and sell support for Crossover at the same time, and the user running a modern browser at the side of this. If they succed they can sell licenses, companies can install a newer OS, and the fact that the application will most likely be bootstrapped to only access the Active X part of the network will also improve security if well handled.

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                      • #12
                        Codeweavers, wine, and all this balmerware compatibility crap really pisses me off. This is a branch of software that needs to be CUT OFF, not worked in at all costs.

                        Adding balmershite compatibility to non-balmer OS's does NOTHING to push website/software/whatever_else developers to make cross-platform compatible code. It gives them a LAZY WAY OUT. It needs to END.

                        Firefox/Chrome/etc. work on MS. That means that building your websites to work with Firefox/Chrome/etc. DOES NOT CUT OFF CUSTOMERS. Building websites for BSIE (that's BS for BULLSH**) **DOES** cut off potential customers.... but not any more... now lazy retarded devs can make BSIE websites and it will work on Linux. F*** OFF AS**OLES!!!!

                        Let balmer feel the pain.
                        CUT THEM OFF!!!!
                        Wine and BS compatibility HURTS EVERYONE.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                          Codeweavers, wine, and all this balmerware compatibility crap really pisses me off. This is a branch of software that needs to be CUT OFF, not worked in at all costs.

                          Adding balmershite compatibility to non-balmer OS's does NOTHING to push website/software/whatever_else developers to make cross-platform compatible code. It gives them a LAZY WAY OUT. It needs to END.

                          Firefox/Chrome/etc. work on MS. That means that building your websites to work with Firefox/Chrome/etc. DOES NOT CUT OFF CUSTOMERS. Building websites for BSIE (that's BS for BULLSH**) **DOES** cut off potential customers.... but not any more... now lazy retarded devs can make BSIE websites and it will work on Linux. F*** OFF AS**OLES!!!!

                          Let balmer feel the pain.
                          CUT THEM OFF!!!!
                          Wine and BS compatibility HURTS EVERYONE.
                          You seem to forget the hugely wide deployment of ActiveX for intranet CMS systems in enterprises, which is what CodeWeavers is aiming at. Very often the Windows -> Linux migration is ruled out by companies because the cost of porting from ActiveX to whatever open standard you choose is higher than just buying new Windows licences and sticking to ActiveX. By trying to eliminate this extra cost that is holding back Linux in enterprise, CodeWeaver is actually helping the adoption of Linux, other than of course seeking for private profit, as any company.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by r1348 View Post
                            You seem to forget the hugely wide deployment of ActiveX for intranet CMS systems in enterprises, which is what CodeWeavers is aiming at. Very often the Windows -> Linux migration is ruled out by companies because the cost of porting from ActiveX to whatever open standard you choose is higher than just buying new Windows licences and sticking to ActiveX. By trying to eliminate this extra cost that is holding back Linux in enterprise, CodeWeaver is actually helping the adoption of Linux, other than of course seeking for private profit, as any company.
                            Yeah, the target market for this isn't Joe User trying to access some malware-ridden pr0n site, it's Joe Corporate trying to access some awful legacy site. Most users here would be appalled at how many government- and quasi-government-sites that are mandatory for businesses are limping along on ASP code dating from 1998 running on Win2K IIS and doing the bulk of their work in crashy ActiveX controls, because they could hire VB programmers cheaply back then. Then there are the apps that use it for a browser-hardware interface (e.g. business-to-business web apps that use a scanner) and other situations that exist because there was no way to do it "right" 10 years ago and now the budget's not there to throw it out and do it over the right way.

                            This is another tool to un-entrench Windows, for those looking for something closer to native than VirtualBox or vSphere. It treats ActiveX web sites as legacy software, like banks were treating their mainframe stuff when I started working for them 22 years ago. It's no less a niche product than Wine itself has been all this time, but it's another option, one which might attract some attention when businesses start looking at having to deploy Windows 8 -- where all their existing software is treated as legacy software anyway.

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                            • #15
                              If there's a technology that should be pushed to death and buried (be it alive) it's ActiveX for God's sake! Granted there's still a lot of (numbers wanted here) of intranet sites that rely upon it but that is mostly M$ products and other bloatware, anyway products that cost you an arm or both legs.

                              The best thing to do is to [continue to] advertise free products and open standards and let companies choose by themselves. First win the battle for open standards and technologies on the public place. Then and only then (maybe) start peeking into companies businesses. But that's not what will make the open source win. It is already on the good way to convincing IT departments by its various attractive features, price coming first... Fiddling with IE while even M$ developers say «that sh** should disappear for good» is just a waste of time.

                              There are places that aren't worth conquering.

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