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Corel Releases Professional Linux Photo Software

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  • #46
    Originally posted by liam View Post
    Btw, what I'd really like to see is a widely accepted standard binary XML format.
    I think I am missing something here, since "binary XML format" seems like an oxymoron.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Sidicas View Post
      Same here... But don't..

      The reality is that the only reason this software runs on Linux is because Corel bought out the company that supported this software under Linux.. None of Corel's other software runs under Linux and to think that Corel will continue to support Linux regardless of how many sales they get on this product could be a big mistake... They might not have the staff or expertise to support this product under Linux, and might not have any plans to hire any since Corel has always been an all-Windows shop. The Linux support is probably just an added perk from the buy-out that they're planning on profiting from as much as possible and then dumping it afterwards..

      Windows developers are both CHEAPER in salary and EASIER to find.. That's why Corel dumped Linux a while ago, and I'd expect them to do it again.

      Well on the other side of the coin Corel may be wanting to now get their feet wet with Linux again thru purchasing Bibble and retaining Bibble's tech support people that are familiar with Linux. This *hopefully* is the scenario that this turns out to be and if they keep the Linux version of the program as well as keeping it updated then this can become a win for Corel considering their rather checkered past in Linux-land.

      PS: I sure hope to see such gems as WordPerfect running on Linux again (even though Corel no longer owns it)

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      • #48
        Originally posted by TheBlackCat View Post
        I think I am missing something here, since "binary XML format" seems like an oxymoron.
        So, you haven't heard of the chm format (I think it is a microsoft format, but it is/was quite a popular textbook format)?
        I THINK you are thinking the same thing as my gf, namely, that the point of XML is that it is always, in principle, human readable. She doesn't like the idea of a binary XML format b/c it opens the door to inherently unreadable markup. Well, I think that is why we have standards. Unfortunately, in this area, the different standards agencies are picking different horses (leaving aside Mastroska's EBML as simply niche), so it seems as though this is not going to go anywhere.
        Too bad, b/c some of those binary parsers are SO much faster than standard text parsers...

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        • #49
          Clueless?

          Michael:

          I'm surprised by your lack of understanding of what the different graphics tools you mentioned in your article are about.

          There's no such thing as "Adobe Photoshop Lightroom". It's either Adobe Photoshop or Adobe Lightroom, two different programs with different goals and purposes. Also, the GIMP has little to do with software like Adobe Lightroom or Corel's AfterShot Pro. The GIMP is a lot like Photoshop.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by liam View Post
            I THINK you are thinking the same thing as my gf, namely, that the point of XML is that it is always, in principle, human readable.
            Uh, yes, that is one of the explicit goals of the XML standard in the first place. See goal #6 of the standard here:

            6. XML documents should be human-legible and reasonably clear.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by ciplogic View Post
              Yes and no. Depends how much back-logic is there. Cross-platform desktop applications may be exposed via HTML5 [...]
              You are completely right, I was just amazed how Qt simplifies writing cross platform application in C++. I used Qt in my MA thesis, I wrote proof of concept application for Linux, Windows and Symbian. The same code, just recompile. Beside small bugs everything worked quite smoothly. Of course Qt brings some problems, Symbian port was beta-quality and had some issues with threads and input handling, but (form me) it would be impossible to write such application in very limited time.
              I know that Qt is not a remedy form every problem, but it really helps in C++ applications, when usage of Java or HTML is not possible. Is not the only solution too. But (IMHO) in this case it's done great job. This application don't use platform dependent features, differences in file and network handling were solved by using Qt. Could be done in another way? Surely, but this way was chosen

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              • #52
                Originally posted by TheBlackCat View Post
                Uh, yes, that is one of the explicit goals of the XML standard in the first place. See goal #6 of the standard here:
                That may be, but it's not the standard's fault humans can't read binary.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by curaga View Post
                  You should be blaming SVG, a standard so crappy no two programs can understand each other's SVG perfectly.
                  How can I blame SVG, when both Inkscape and Firefox understand it properly and 500$-heavy Coreldraw x10 does not? I think I blame corel instead

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                  • #54
                    wrong

                    Originally posted by Aleve Sicofante View Post
                    Michael:

                    I'm surprised by your lack of understanding of what the different graphics tools you mentioned in your article are about.

                    There's no such thing as "Adobe Photoshop Lightroom". It's either Adobe Photoshop or Adobe Lightroom, two different programs with different goals and purposes. Also, the GIMP has little to do with software like Adobe Lightroom or Corel's AfterShot Pro. The GIMP is a lot like Photoshop.
                    wrong! the product is indeed called "Adobe Photoshop Lightroom". (if you really want to attack someone on such a minor naming error at least make sure you are correct).

                    https://www.adobe.com/products/photoshoplightroom/

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Aleve Sicofante View Post
                      Michael:

                      I'm surprised by your lack of understanding of what the different graphics tools you mentioned in your article are about.

                      There's no such thing as "Adobe Photoshop Lightroom". It's either Adobe Photoshop or Adobe Lightroom, two different programs with different goals and purposes. Also, the GIMP has little to do with software like Adobe Lightroom or Corel's AfterShot Pro. The GIMP is a lot like Photoshop.
                      wrong!. the product is indeed called "Adobe Photoshop Lightroom". (if you really need to attack someone on a minor naming thing like this, at least make sure you are correct!).

                      http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshoplightroom/

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        It wasn't long ago that I got an inkscape svg file that librsvg couldn't show properly. Browsers still differ and so on.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by liam View Post
                          Anyone compared this to darktable yet?
                          Well, as a quick test I tried darktable and Bibble/Aftershot scanning a directory of 200 CR2 files to generate their thumbnails in the GUI. Darktable was slow as molasses (around 3 minutes) to get them shown while Aftershot took about 15 seconds to check through the whole directory. Also I have to say as a long time Bibble Pro user that I wouldn't find darktable usable to my needs especially owning a license to noiseninja as well which Aftershot supports.

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by jpalko View Post
                            Well, as a quick test I tried darktable and Bibble/Aftershot scanning a directory of 200 CR2 files to generate their thumbnails in the GUI. Darktable was slow as molasses (around 3 minutes) to get them shown while Aftershot took about 15 seconds to check through the whole directory. Also I have to say as a long time Bibble Pro user that I wouldn't find darktable usable to my needs especially owning a license to noiseninja as well which Aftershot supports.
                            I'm curious as to what version you were using since the darktable website (http://www.darktable.org/features/) states a number of optimizations. Now, maybe you didn't have an opencl enabled stack, or your processor didn't support the simd, but I would expect it to be extremely fast.

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by liam View Post
                              I'm curious as to what version you were using since the darktable website (http://www.darktable.org/features/) states a number of optimizations. Now, maybe you didn't have an opencl enabled stack, or your processor didn't support the simd, but I would expect it to be extremely fast.
                              Version: Ubuntu darktable oneiric package v0.9-1. So, looks like it's not the newest one there yet. The updated versions of darktable must not have gotten into 11.10 due to their release dates compared to oneiric version freeze. Perhaps I'll try the PPA version later and compare again.
                              Processor: Intel i7 950 with 12GB DDR3 RAM

                              Anyway, the ease of Bibble's lens correction, noiseninja integration, really well working image adjustments, speed of generating previews and processing image in batch output, with the predefinable output profiles also, keep me pretty well still using now AfterShot, I mean Bibble Pro. Corel may have renamed it to fit better into their naming portfolio but I still consider it as Bibble Pro.

                              It is good that there is darktable, don't get me wrong but having already paid for Bibble and gotten used to that one on Linux, I like it and I might like darktable if I hadn't already gotten used to Bibble. The GUI in darktable 0.9-1 felt badly ordered compared to Bibble to me but perhaps I'm just used to doing things in the Bibble way and couldn't get enthusiastic about doing things the darktable way.

                              We'll have to see what Corel does to the software in the future but if Bibble Labs employees still do the actual work and are allowed to support the way they used to, the software has great support crew and community behind it who react to problems well and instruct even in harder issues with distributions that aren't actually supported.

                              Besides, the upgrade price of 18 to AfterShot Pro that earlier Bibble Pro customers had to pay, was not that bad. Although, it remains to be seen how that pricing will be with Corel once the first new paid upgrade comes. Bibble used to give all minor upgrades for free and major updates had to be bought unless if you happened to buy close to next version release when you got the upgrade for free as well. Personally I would have considered Bibble Pro 5 -> Aftershot Pro as a minor upgrade but they decided to request a payment from the upgrade. Luckily the pricing was reasonable for old customers though.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by jpalko View Post
                                Version: Ubuntu darktable oneiric package v0.9-1. So, looks like it's not the newest one there yet. The updated versions of darktable must not have gotten into 11.10 due to their release dates compared to oneiric version freeze. Perhaps I'll try the PPA version later and compare again.
                                Processor: Intel i7 950 with 12GB DDR3 RAM

                                Anyway, the ease of Bibble's lens correction, noiseninja integration, really well working image adjustments, speed of generating previews and processing image in batch output, with the predefinable output profiles also, keep me pretty well still using now AfterShot, I mean Bibble Pro. Corel may have renamed it to fit better into their naming portfolio but I still consider it as Bibble Pro.

                                It is good that there is darktable, don't get me wrong but having already paid for Bibble and gotten used to that one on Linux, I like it and I might like darktable if I hadn't already gotten used to Bibble. The GUI in darktable 0.9-1 felt badly ordered compared to Bibble to me but perhaps I'm just used to doing things in the Bibble way and couldn't get enthusiastic about doing things the darktable way.

                                We'll have to see what Corel does to the software in the future but if Bibble Labs employees still do the actual work and are allowed to support the way they used to, the software has great support crew and community behind it who react to problems well and instruct even in harder issues with distributions that aren't actually supported.

                                Besides, the upgrade price of 18 to AfterShot Pro that earlier Bibble Pro customers had to pay, was not that bad. Although, it remains to be seen how that pricing will be with Corel once the first new paid upgrade comes. Bibble used to give all minor upgrades for free and major updates had to be bought unless if you happened to buy close to next version release when you got the upgrade for free as well. Personally I would have considered Bibble Pro 5 -> Aftershot Pro as a minor upgrade but they decided to request a payment from the upgrade. Luckily the pricing was reasonable for old customers though.
                                Yeah, obviously if you've already paid for something, and it works for you, then changing doesn't make sense, and I think you're using a recent enough version (assuming you're driver is able to handle OpenCl) that the recent OpenCL work should've come down.
                                I found an interesting thread in the ubuntu forums where there was discussion about darktable as compared to lightroom/BP/RT/etc. This guy in particular (http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php...4&postcount=95 ) seemed to really like DT as compared to everthing else (except lightroom), but obviously if you've invested significent time into a particular workflow getting to a similar level of productivity with alternate software can take awhile, assuming such is even possible.
                                Still, glad to see you giving DT a look.

                                Best/Liam

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