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Official request page for Adobe Creative Suite on Linux

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  • Official request page for Adobe Creative Suite on Linux

    Hi everyone, the article here:
    OMG Ubuntu- Creative Suite for Linux
    apparently attracted enough attention to Adobe's people that they suggested that interested users visit the following page and click on the "I like it" button.

    Idea page for Creative Suite on Linux

    If you are interested in this, I would recommend you head over there and indicate your interest.

  • #2
    More proprietary software for Linux.....YAY
    One application to populate Ubuntu third party Software Center.....YAY

    Then again, this does provide evidence that hardware and software companies are no longer able to ignore Linux users.

    BTW, OMGUbuntu? Where do they come up with these crappy names?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Mr James View Post
      Then again, this does provide evidence that hardware and software companies are no longer able to ignore Linux users.

      Well they are quite capable of continuing to ignore them. These types of things have gone on before and have resulted to nothing. Bioware has had polls in the past on the operating systems where linux heavily took the majority of OS's what customers would like to see their products ported for. Adobe took a better part of a decade just getting out an alpha 64-bit flash client. Atari's longest thread on their forums was asking for linux and os x ports of nwn2 as well. Just because some guy puts up a suggestion and a few vocal people cry for a port doesn't mean in any way that they will get one.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by deanjo View Post
        Well they are quite capable of continuing to ignore them. These types of things have gone on before and have resulted to nothing.
        Very true unfortunately. It took autodesk 28 years to release a MacOS version of autocad. Ok, so in this case MacOS (System 1 - 1984) hadn't been released yet when autocad first saw the daylight (1982), but you get the picture. It's not like autodesk doesn't know how to port things to other OSes besides windows, because they have Maya which historically has always ran on Mac and Linux.

        It's a shame that software companies don't invest more money in linux ports, as linux is the perfect workstation environment. Maybe they just think "Hmm... if these people are so cheap that they don't even pay for their OS, they surely won't pay for our software", when they should instead think "Hmm... these people could just as easily have installed a pirated copy of windows, but they chose linux. Maybe we won't suffer so much with piracy from them".

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        • #5
          Originally posted by devius View Post
          It's a shame that software companies don't invest more money in linux ports, as linux is the perfect workstation environment.
          While this is true, you can't hardly blame them. Having a successful revenue stream coming in from the linux market is extremely rare when it comes to pay model software. Maya is probably one of the few rare exceptions that seems to have had much success in having a linux version. Others have tried before and after many years discontinued their linux lines such as PTC's Pro/E. Even then many of those applications were ported to linux simply because SGI decided to kill IRIX and switch to linux and that was a short lived.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by deanjo View Post
            While this is true, you can't hardly blame them. Having a successful revenue stream coming in from the linux market is extremely rare when it comes to pay model software.
            The thing is, linux has evolved a lot in the last 5 years. I'm not surprised there weren't more prefessional users installing linux on their computers 5-10 years ago. Even in late 2006 ubuntu didn't support BIOS RAID arrays, something that, at the time, was a very common feature on motherboards for at least 3 years. It was generally a pain in the ass to get things going. I see the linux desktop getting more and more consolidated with each passing year, but still you got to really want to use it and not other OSes.

            Another issue is the simple fact that windows is everywhere. It's way easier for a company to find technical support for windows than for linux, and technical support is one of the most crucial features for a company. So, of course windows software is more profitable. We all know that it's what comes with every new computer because it's what most people use, and it's what most people use because it's what comes with every new computer. It's very very difficult to break this endless cycle (loop?).

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            • #7
              Originally posted by deanjo View Post
              Maya is probably one of the few rare exceptions that seems to have had much success in having a linux version.
              True. AFAIK all the big studios use linux workstation with tens of hundreds of dollars worth in software. I also know that some smaller studios are already switching to blender. I'm also very impressed by the amount of features it has. Probably the best piece of free professional software that runs on linux right now. Some say it's even getting very close to maya itself.

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