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X Input 2 Support Goes Into GTK+ 3.0

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  • #21
    @pingufunkybeat That is not really correct. kdelibs is LGPL, the rest is mostly GPL.
    Though there is one thing you have to keep in mind, kdelibs can use parts that are GPL, so if one wanted to use kdelibs commercially they would have to make sure that any dependency is LGPL or a weaker license as well.

    I also find it sad that Qt gets ignored, because I think that it is a lot better than what I have read (! not used it myself) about GTK. Take this [1] and this [2]. Yeah it is great that GTK _finally_ catches up, but come one I did not experience those issues with Qt since ... ages, I can't even remember such issues.

    And in fact a lot is happening in Qt-land, just read Qt Labs. My personal favourite -- even tough it was not that much work for them and is not complicated at all -- is the way the wrapper for OpenCl works. That is OpenCl done easy and clean.

    [1] http://live.gnome.org/MathiasHasselm...wLayoutManager
    [2] http://blogs.gnome.org/tvb/2010/04/1...ayout-for-gtk/

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    • #22
      Originally posted by mat69 View Post
      @pingufunkybeat That is not really correct. kdelibs is LGPL, the rest is mostly GPL.
      Though there is one thing you have to keep in mind, kdelibs can use parts that are GPL, so if one wanted to use kdelibs commercially they would have to make sure that any dependency is LGPL or a weaker license as well.

      I also find it sad that Qt gets ignored, because I think that it is a lot better than what I have read (! not used it myself) about GTK. Take this [1] and this [2]. Yeah it is great that GTK _finally_ catches up, but come one I did not experience those issues with Qt since ... ages, I can't even remember such issues.

      And in fact a lot is happening in Qt-land, just read Qt Labs. My personal favourite -- even tough it was not that much work for them and is not complicated at all -- is the way the wrapper for OpenCl works. That is OpenCl done easy and clean.

      [1] http://live.gnome.org/MathiasHasselm...wLayoutManager
      [2] http://blogs.gnome.org/tvb/2010/04/1...ayout-for-gtk/
      What Mat69 said. Qt is open, as long as you don't want to sell your software, and Uhm... KDE is dependent on Qt.

      The first release of KDE for Debian was 2.2.2. Can't recall when Qt stopped having such a jacked license though.

      Either way, Qt does look / act a bit better under other Operating Systems than GTK does, but both libraries are quite nice. I just simply prefer Gnome over KDE, and so do a lot of people.

      leech

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      • #23
        Originally posted by leech View Post
        What Mat69 said. Qt is open, as long as you don't want to sell your software, and Uhm... KDE is dependent on Qt.
        That is not what I said.
        What I said is that you have to make sure whatever is used in kdelibs is LGPL if you sell stuff that depends on LGPL. Qt itself is GPL, LGPL and QPL as has been pointed out already. GTK has _no_ license advantage anymore.

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        • #24
          Ximian is no more; Novell is now knee-deep in bed with KDE SC (and Microsoft.
          Qt is now GPL'd.
          Gnome is on the upgrading tour and found a purpose in becomming a completely semantic orientated desktop and the Gnome-shell screenie on the Fedora 13 introduction page looks sexy.
          KDE SC 4.5 beta is news on Phoronix.
          Flamewars have been fun but going on too long...

          Bury the axes?

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          • #25
            Awwww.

            If we don't flame KDE and GNOME, what are we going to do?!

            You must be an Emacs user!

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            • #26
              What Mat69 said. Qt is open, as long as you don't want to sell your software, and Uhm... KDE is dependent on Qt.
              Qt is LGPL.

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              • #27
                You guys are missing the point talking about which distros run what. Michael only ever cares about one - Ubuntu. And that runs GTK/Gnome, so that's all that ever gets covered here. Which is fine. Honestly I'd rather read the KDE/Qt news from the source anyway, and let Michael cover what he knows rather than trying to poorly cover something he doesn't.

                And just to throw flames on the fire, is there a single new technology that GTK3 is supporting that Qt hasn't already had for at least 2 years?

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                  No, it means that you can plug four mouses into your computer and they'll all work independently.
                  But I can already do that with the current releases of Ubuntu and Fedora...

                  And yes I understand this allows it natively on an application level but I can still have four mice hooked up now and have multiple independent pointers/keyboards and operate multiple programs at once.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
                    You must be an Emacs user!
                    Virtualising operating systems is overrated

                    PS: Would love to master emacs though

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by unimatrix View Post
                      Any idea when and how that will be made possible?
                      Wow! If all the OT posters haven't scared you off…

                      Having multiple pointers is already possible with a reasonably up to date distro. (Within a year).

                      Use “xinput list” to get a list of all attached input devices. You can refer to these by either their full names, or their ids.

                      “xinput create-master” creates a new master pointer. You can attach input devices to that master pointer using “xinput reattach.” Attaching both a keyboard and a mouse to a pointer essentially permits you to enter text in two places at once.

                      Lots of interesting stuff emerges, like touch screen / tablet interaction that doesn't interfere with the mouse, but acts in its own distinct fashion.

                      Naturally there's a long way to go. This feature started with MPX, and it's making its way through the stack. With support in GTK, it is possible for an application to make use of all the extra information provided by xinput 2, including multiple distinct pointers. Right now, if you use two pointers in the same app, it gets really confused.

                      Hopefully, given love and time, we will see distros using the new functionality in smart ways
                      This is a spot where Linux has a real chance to innovate.

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