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Totem Gains New Features For GNOME 3.0

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  • Totem Gains New Features For GNOME 3.0

    Phoronix: Totem Gains New Features For GNOME 3.0

    The first development milestone for GNOME 3.0 is expected to be reached tomorrow with the release of the unstable GNOME 2.31.1 package set. While Zeitgeist, the GNOME Shell, and Mutter are among the most talked about changes for the GNOME 3.0 desktop, many mature packages are receiving new features and work too. GNOME's Movie Player, Totem, is one of these packages receiving some attention...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODIxMQ

  • #2
    Great news, how about getting rid of Totem's amateurish GUI (which many have the guts to call "simple")?
    There are enough apps in Gnome with an amateurish look and feel but Totem beats them all hands down (with the usual excuse of "simplicity").

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    • #3
      Originally posted by cl333r View Post
      Great news, how about getting rid of Totem's amateurish GUI (which many have the guts to call "simple")?
      There are enough apps in Gnome with an amateurish look and feel but Totem beats them all hands down (with the usual excuse of "simplicity").
      Well, a simpe "rm /usr/share/totem/*.ui", and the amateurish GUI is gone.

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      • #4
        Oh really, no kidding

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        • #5
          Probably only devs are using it anyway ...

          Real users use either VLC Player or Mplayer (Smplayer)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by val-gaav View Post
            Probably only devs are using it anyway ...

            Real users use either VLC Player or Mplayer (Smplayer)
            Totem provides me with everything I need. When I double click on a file it starts playing. I can pause, I can scrub through the video. The playlist allows me to queue up files. What more could I want?

            Well, there is one thing, but nothing fundamental. What I would like to see is a way to change the delay of the audio, so I can fix files that are out of sync. I'd write a python plugin, but the totem object doesn't expose the proper hooks. I'll report this as a feature request some day.

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            • #7
              Well -af volnorm is really nice on mplayer, could be done with vlc too, but not that easy - somewhere hidden in the gui.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Remco View Post
                Totem provides me with everything I need. When I double click on a file it starts playing. I can pause, I can scrub through the video. The playlist allows me to queue up files. What more could I want?
                That's somewhat a fundamental features of a player. If those are to be the selling point of totem and if it cannot do anything beside that then it is laughable ...

                Well, there is one thing, but nothing fundamental. What I would like to see is a way to change the delay of the audio, so I can fix files that are out of sync.
                You just named one of the things yourself (BTW this is a must and both VLC and Smplayer have this) I could name several other key features like ASS/SSA support, but I don't want to waste my time and check what current Totem has and what it has not. I know what it didn't have in a brief moment I've tried it, some time ago. I highly doubt the current totem got any better. Considering the GNOME mentality it really is enough for a player to just play files pause and maybe have a fullscreen mode ...

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                • #9
                  Having a native player for each and every desktop environment once was a novel idea, but it's rather pointless in 2010. I gave up on totem a while back because it was lacking more things than I care to remember.

                  Personally, I use gnome-mplayer.

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                  • #10
                    Totem is fine.

                    It is almost ideal for the majority of users. Very simple interface, and not cluttered like vlc, or opens with 2 separate windows like mplayer. Out-of-the-box it is pretty good if you include the various gstreamer packages that allow you to play non-free formats.
                    My problems with it is that they need to push the accelerated bits to free gstreamer, and, as has already been mentioned, some synchronization functionality. There are probably many other things that I would like it to have ideally, but if I need those I'll use another player, or some other tool.

                    For those that don't like Gnome: we get it. Is it necessary to reply to every Gnomish thread stating that over and over again?

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                    • #11
                      Deinterlacing, asynchronous, playlist, codebase/code base, webcam/web camera.

                      There's no need to try and put a hyphen in everything.

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                      • #12
                        Totem is fine for simple video playback (as long as you don't use it in combination with fglrx) Personally I would like to see a good video application for GNOME that can also manage your video collection with tagging and stuff. Just as we have for photos and music. This whole concept of browsing your file system for videos seems a bit outdated to me.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by val-gaav View Post
                          You just named one of the things yourself (BTW this is a must and both VLC and Smplayer have this)
                          The reason it's not a must is because you can (and should) fix the files permanently. I just want to write a plugin that does that while playing. It's hardly a fundamental feature.

                          I could name several other key features like ASS/SSA support but I don't want to waste my time and check what current Totem has and what it has not.
                          I don't know whether it supports that particular type of subtitle, but if it doesn't it should. But that's just making the video playback feature-complete. It would basically be missing support for a codec.
                          I know what it didn't have in a brief moment I've tried it, some time ago. I highly doubt the current totem got any better. Considering the GNOME mentality it really is enough for a player to just play files pause and maybe have a fullscreen mode ...
                          Play/pause, scrub, fullscreen, playlist is all I ask of the interface. I don't want to be able to modify the video in all sorts of ways, making it blurry, wobbly, mirrored, black and white, add noise, split it up, resize, crop, 10 different deinterlacers... it's the featuritis that make Mplayer and VLC look completely cluttered. They have 1000s of features, but basic fullscreen functionality is unreliable.

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                          • #14
                            There is Banshee, but...

                            Originally posted by monraaf View Post
                            Totem is fine for simple video playback (as long as you don't use it in combination with fglrx) Personally I would like to see a good video application for GNOME that can also manage your video collection with tagging and stuff. Just as we have for photos and music. This whole concept of browsing your file system for videos seems a bit outdated to me.
                            ...I'm not a big fan of MONO apps (I find them slow, buggy, and memory intensive).
                            What I would like, in my ideal Gnome3 desktop, are some add-on miners for Tracker that would look at media titles/metadata and search the web (like MusicBrainz) and then enter in the complete metadata for me. Since Tracker is back in Gnome's good graces I hope this will be possible soon b/c, IMHO, one of the killer ideas behind Gnome 3 is getting rid of/minimizing the amount of browsing one has to do.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by liam View Post
                              ...I'm not a big fan of MONO apps (I find them slow, buggy, and memory intensive).
                              Yeah, me neither.

                              What I would like, in my ideal Gnome3 desktop, are some add-on miners for Tracker that would look at media titles/metadata and search the web (like MusicBrainz) and then enter in the complete metadata for me. Since Tracker is back in Gnome's good graces I hope this will be possible soon b/c, IMHO, one of the killer ideas behind Gnome 3 is getting rid of/minimizing the amount of browsing one has to do.
                              I tend to prefer using apps that are specialized for specific tasks. Don't know about a generic desktop meta-data service. There's an old saying "Jack of all trades, master of none". So I'm a bit skeptical about Gnome 3. But who knows. I guess I'll have to wait and see.

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