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Totem Gains New Features For GNOME 3.0

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  • #16
    Sure. I can understand that.

    Originally posted by monraaf View Post
    I tend to prefer using apps that are specialized for specific tasks. Don't know about a generic desktop meta-data service. There's an old saying "Jack of all trades, master of none". So I'm a bit skeptical about Gnome 3. But who knows. I guess I'll have to wait and see.
    You also know what they say, "Just because it is a saying..."
    I really love the idea of Tracker, and the latest stable isn't bad (though when I first tested it I had huge problems with tracker-store just Hoovering ram), so that is the solution to many problems with the Linux, or at least the Gnome, desktop. A central data store for all non-configuration data. The indexing is, for me, a nice bonus. Having one thing do this means more developers can focus on one codebase and more testers. That, and I also love the idea of simply copying my tracker-db over to a new system and having all the media applications know my interests.

    I've been using GS on and off for many months and it has made great progress (stability-wise), but I feel like they've forgotten some of the other mandates that they themselves put forward for Gnome 3 (like an adaptive interface). I'm waiting for st to mature a bit more before I dig into it, and I don't understand why their using a separate flash-derived library for tweening rather than Clutter/clutter-based.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Remco View Post
      Well, there is one thing, but nothing fundamental. What I would like to see is a way to change the delay of the audio, so I can fix files that are out of sync.
      [rant mode (not related to your post!)]
      The reason this hasn't been implemented because it's very very bad. Having the audio out of sync is because the "person" who made the video doesn't know how to encode properly.

      We already have enough "quirks" in our video players for virtually any format just because some random file wasn't encoded properly and needs it. The sad thing is, the files then start spreading because some random "awezzome video encoderzzzz FREE FREE FREE" application thinks it can encode video without the user knowing how to do it. It's worse than web standards.

      I mean seriously, people should just learn how to encode video files properly. A video player shouldn't have to 'fix' their mess.
      [/rant mode]

      On a side note, I agree with you that Totem is all I need for viewing a view videos. I don't download illegal videos, so the audio being out of sync is very rare.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by beniwtv View Post
        [rant mode (not related to your post!)]
        (...)

        I mean seriously, people should just learn how to encode video files properly. A video player shouldn't have to 'fix' their mess.
        [/rant mode]

        On a side note, I agree with you that Totem is all I need for viewing a view videos. I don't download illegal videos, so the audio being out of sync is very rare.
        The person viewing is rarely the person that encoded the file, so I don't understand what your point was about people needing to learn how to encode properly (if there ever was one). Unless you're saying Totem is a video encoder, which I doubt.

        As for viewing legal videos:
        1. there's always good movies released on DVD and Bluray by Big Content where the audio stream isn't perfectly synced with the video stream - a good video player can fix that;
        2. different monitors have different output lag, up to 1/5th of a second. One second is a really long time actually, you can fit a decent sentence into one or two seconds, so 1/5th is quite noticeable if you look at the person speaking. Worse for short duration sounds when you see the act on screen (door closing, steps...);
        3. there's plenty of small content producers out there that don't provide as technically good content as big media. It doesn't make their work less worth watching;
        4. "legal" isn't just DVD+Bluray, there's also TV and (legal) streaming, both sometimes have their flaws.

        Saying one shouldn't watch contents where the audio is slightly out of sync isn't just silly, it's like a new form of censure. In the name of what, a blindly ignorant developer?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by miles View Post
          The person viewing is rarely the person that encoded the file, so I don't understand what your point was about people needing to learn how to encode properly (if there ever was one). Unless you're saying Totem is a video encoder, which I doubt.
          Nope, I didn't say Totem was an encoder

          However, people watching these encoded movies are the "victims", if you so will.

          Originally posted by miles View Post
          As for viewing legal videos:
          1. there's always good movies released on DVD and Bluray by Big Content where the audio stream isn't perfectly synced with the video stream - a good video player can fix that;
          That's unacceptable - sorry, but if I buy a legal DVD or Bluray from some film company (size doesn't matter), it better not be out of sync.

          Originally posted by miles View Post
          2. different monitors have different output lag, up to 1/5th of a second. One second is a really long time actually, you can fit a decent sentence into one or two seconds, so 1/5th is quite noticeable if you look at the person speaking. Worse for short duration sounds when you see the act on screen (door closing, steps...);
          Never heard of such a thing, so no comment. But if it's true, you may have a point there.

          Originally posted by miles View Post
          3. there's plenty of small content producers out there that don't provide as technically good content as big media. It doesn't make their work less worth watching;
          Size of the content producer doesn't matter.

          Originally posted by miles View Post
          4. "legal" isn't just DVD+Bluray, there's also TV and (legal) streaming, both sometimes have their flaws.
          True, but audio is hardly out of sync when you watch TV. And standards like DVB-T or DVB-S usually are pretty well followed by TV content producers to make sure it plays nice with everyone.

          Originally posted by miles View Post
          Saying one shouldn't watch contents where the audio is slightly out of sync isn't just silly, it's like a new form of censure. In the name of what, a blindly ignorant developer?
          I didn't say you shouldn't watch it. It was just a call to content producers, not users, in case you missed the point . If you produce content, make sure you know how to do it right. Period. The tools are there, even open source. There is just no excuse for audio out of sync or non-standard frame rates/frame sizes/audio samples.

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