Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

GNOME 2.30 Released; Farewell To GNOME 2.xx

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #11
    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    Judging from the screenshot, they did a nice job with the window decorations, but the widget style is still awful.
    As I already wrote: That's Ubuntu and not how GNOME looks by default.

    Comment


    • #12
      Originally posted by waucka View Post
      Well, you can tell KDE to make GTK+ apps use the QtCurve style. That will make them fit in pretty well. Granted, it might make some applications crash (at least on Ubuntu), but at least they will look pretty while doing so. Clearlooks doesn't fit in as well, but it doesn't make anything crash, either.

      The real solution, though, is to come up with some sort of common widget theme standard so that GTK+ and Qt/KDE apps can use the same theme with ease. I have heard people talk about such things, but I have never seen anything actually happen.
      It did happen from the Qt side. Qt apps will use the active Gtk style under Gnome. They look like Gtk apps. The reverse isn't true, Gtk apps can not use the active Qt style.

      It's just sad that Gtk does not return the favor here.

      Comment


      • #13
        http://labs.trolltech.com/blogs/2008...ing-qgtkstyle/

        "We already have QCleanlooks, icon themes, standard shortcuts and dialog buttons to integrate with GNOME, but to achieve true perfection we need to use the Gtk theme engine directly just like we do on Mac and Windows. QGtkStyle does exactly this"

        Comment


        • #14
          Originally posted by waucka View Post
          Well, you can tell KDE to make GTK+ apps use the QtCurve style. That will make them fit in pretty well. Granted, it might make some applications crash (at least on Ubuntu), but at least they will look pretty while doing so. Clearlooks doesn't fit in as well, but it doesn't make anything crash, either.

          The real solution, though, is to come up with some sort of common widget theme standard so that GTK+ and Qt/KDE apps can use the same theme with ease. I have heard people talk about such things, but I have never seen anything actually happen.
          Redhat tried that with Bluecurve like 10 years ago. Or is that not what you mean?

          Comment


          • #15
            Originally posted by RealNC View Post
            It did happen from the Qt side. Qt apps will use the active Gtk style under Gnome. They look like Gtk apps. The reverse isn't true, Gtk apps can not use the active Qt style.

            It's just sad that Gtk does not return the favor here.
            Probably due to the fact that it is less capable of doing so...(at least properly as there are some oxygen attempts but nowhere near the equivalent to Qt)

            Comment


            • #16
              Originally posted by RealNC View Post
              It did happen from the Qt side. Qt apps will use the active Gtk style under Gnome. They look like Gtk apps. The reverse isn't true, Gtk apps can not use the active Qt style.

              It's just sad that Gtk does not return the favor here.
              http://code.google.com/p/gtk-qt-engine/

              Comment


              • #17
                I am aware of that. It's an ugly monstrosity. It's far preferable to run Gtk apps with their default style rather than that one.

                Comment


                • #18
                  I wouldn't hold my breath on this...

                  Originally posted by _txf_ View Post
                  Probably due to the fact that it is less capable of doing so...(at least properly as there are some oxygen attempts but nowhere near the equivalent to Qt)
                  Yup... The only real solution would be a native renderer using Qt itself. There are no GTK styles which gets even close to what Oxygen is in KDE 4.4, with it's subtle animations and a peculiar polish.

                  However, I think that GNOME and GTK are in a more comfortable situation, as the most hyped distros (ubuntu / fedora) uses them as default, and many popular applications (firefox / chrome / gimp) are GTK based.

                  Qt / KDE have to run to catch up position. But they are far superior in all aspects. I long for the day where ALL software I run are totally capable of replacing their GTK equivalents.

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Originally posted by val-gaav View Post
                    Not really. I'm actually impressed, because :


                    http://library.gnome.org/misc/releas...ilus.png.en_GB

                    Split View ? Well I know KDE had that LONG time ago, nevertheless it's still nice that gnome will also have it.
                    Lol. My favorite part of the release notes is actually what they said after that:

                    GNOME 2.30 includes updates to Nautilus, the GNOME File Manager. Nautilus features a number of user interface changes including a new split view mode and is now set to browser mode by default, replacing spatial mode.
                    Really? And it only took them until 2010 figure out that it's been the industry standard since 2002. Stubborn bastards...

                    Comment


                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Joe Sixpack View Post
                      Really? And it only took them until 2010 figure out that it's been the industry standard since 2002. Stubborn bastards...
                      Not really. It took them until 2010 to realise that whatever about theoretical user-friendliness and the desktop/folder paradigm, User expectation trumps the theory. In theory spatial mode is easier for a new user, in practice it's not because they aren't "blank slates", they already have a conception of how it works. This is a case of sometimes what is wrong, is actually right.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X