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It's Official: GNOME 3.0 In September 2010

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  • It's Official: GNOME 3.0 In September 2010

    Phoronix: It's Official: GNOME 3.0 In September 2010

    Last week we were the first to report that it looked like GNOME 3.0 would not come until September 2010 after developers wanted a delay compared to their original March 2010 plans. As of last night it's now official that GNOME 3.0 will not be out until September of next year.The GNOME release team has decided (and then announced) that GNOME 3.0 will come in September...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=NzY5MA

  • #2
    Don't a number of high profile open source projects require copyright assignment so that the code can be relicensed?

    IIRC the FSF requires copyright assignment for their products and Mono does as well.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by sreyan View Post
      Don't a number of high profile open source projects require copyright assignment so that the code can be relicensed?
      I think it's mostly so that they can be certain of their standing to sue people who violate the license terms for those packages. In the case of the FSF, their standard licensing scheme allows them to relicense it anyway (by publishing a new version of the GPL).

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      • #4
        Has anybody here tried out a more or less recent version of the Gnome-Shell? I want to know if it increases or decreases productivity compared to the current Gnome UI. I mean, from the looks of it, you have to move your mouse a lot...

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        • #5
          I've used it a bit, but don't use it daily due to lack of applets.
          It's actually really easy on a touchpad. It just takes a quick slide of the finger to the upper left corner of the screen to open the overview window. It's not really any slower than selecting a different window from the bottom bar on classic Gnome. I can't say at this point that Gnome Shell is any better though.. Its just different. It's far from finished, so (hopefully) it can only improve. Only time will tell if the idea is solid.

          I can't really comment on multiple desktops being any better or worse, since I've never heavily used them. That part of Gnome Shell is incredibly easy to work with, so from that aspect its a win so far.
          Last edited by benmoran; 11-11-2009, 08:03 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by benmoran View Post
            I can't really comment on multiple desktops being any better or worse, since I've never heavily used them. That part of Gnome Shell is incredibly easy to work with, so from that aspect its a win so far.
            I find multiple desktops/workspaces awesome, if it wasn't for the fact that instant spawning of windows sucks with it because I can't keep track with them. Kopete really handles this nicely by notifying the user that a new message has been recieved and you can click on the taskbar icon to raise the chat window. Messenger applications are the only reason that I do not use multiple desktops...

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            • #7
              Well that's the problem, really.

              To get the best experience out of Gnome and other normal Linux desktops you have to take advantage of multiple different workspaces. However for people normally used to how Windows works the multiple desktop thing is confusing and difficult.

              They tend to find that all their applications 'disappear'. They don't realize they accidentally clicked on the wrong applet or whatever.

              With the gnome-shell you always just start off with one window, but if you want more you just hit the + icon while in 'activities mode' so you see the second desktop created. Then you can drag and drop your applications into that new desktop.

              To get into 'activities mode' there are 3 ways:

              1) Shove the pointer all the way into the upper right
              2) Hit the 'super' button (also known as the 'windows' button)
              3) Click on the Activities icon in the upper right.

              Then all your windows gets displayed. They are laid out in a grid in a "Expose" type fasion. Animations and movies continue to play in each window.

              As far as 'new messages' that is something that the messaging application developer can take care of. If they put a message icon in your system tray then they can make alerts that way that show up on all your desktops. Or they integrate into the Gnome notification system. Something like that.

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