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Mozilla Releases Firefox 3.5 Officially

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  • Mozilla Releases Firefox 3.5 Officially

    Phoronix: Mozilla Releases Firefox 3.5 Officially

    Finally, the Mozilla Foundation has announced the official release of Mozilla Firefox 3.5. This sizable open-source browser update (formerly known as Firefox 3.1) brings HTML 5 support, a new JavaScript engine (a.k.a...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=NzM1NA

  • #2
    Why they don't release FF for x86_64?
    There are only nightly builds, not official but it works, only TraceMonkey doesn't work because it doesn't support 64-bit! http://hacks.mozilla.org/2009/06/tracemonkey-demo/

    I only hope Arora gets better.

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    • #3
      now please not flash crap any more without alternative! thanks

      /me runs away and hides

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      • #4
        I wonder what they use to provide Theora decoding?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by curaga View Post
          I wonder what they use to provide Theora decoding?
          I believe they're just using the standard libtheora code: http://www.theora.org/svn/

          I know it's something upstream, they didn't create their own implementation.

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          • #6
            So what sites are there that are already using OpenVideo?
            mozilla.org obviously, and all videos on there are working for me.
            Gooogle also brings up openvideo.dailymotion.com, but that's not working for me. I still get the flash-videos and a suggestion to download Firefox 3.5. Maybe it checks the user-agent string and only accepts the windows-version?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Zhick View Post
              Gooogle also brings up openvideo.dailymotion.com, but that's not working for me. I still get the flash-videos and a suggestion to download Firefox 3.5. Maybe it checks the user-agent string and only accepts the windows-version?
              It's doing the same for me on Windows. The demo page seems to work fine, though.

              edit: it gives me the <video> version if I disable the Flash plugin.
              Last edited by Ex-Cyber; 07-01-2009, 11:16 AM.

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              • #8
                I'll have to check it out and see if they made some speed improvements. 3.0.x is incredibly slow on my Aspire's SSD. Still not sure why a web browser needs a SQL database...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jeffro-tull View Post
                  I'll have to check it out and see if they made some speed improvements. 3.0.x is incredibly slow on my Aspire's SSD. Still not sure why a web browser needs a SQL database...
                  Word is, it's working much better on netbooks. It's certainly loading faster and working smoother on my regular PC - I guess the difference will be more pronounced on slower machines.

                  Wrt the SQL database, it's the faster alternative. Any other implementation the nkew address bar would almost certainly be slower than SQLite.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
                    I believe they're just using the standard libtheora code: http://www.theora.org/svn/

                    I know it's something upstream, they didn't create their own implementation.
                    They're using liboggplay, which is a high level API for playback purposes orchestrating libogg, libvorbis and libtheora (and other Xiph.org codecs if needed). Keeping audio and video in sync isn't trivial to do, as is seeking - liboggplay provides this and makes developing playback solutions much easier. Opera may use the same technological foundation when shipping their Theora-enabled browser - IIRC they're currently directly using libogg, libvorbis and libtheora in their experimental builds, but this may or may not change. Google Chrome is doing Theora and Vorbis with ffmpeg's libavcodec.

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                    • #11
                      Phew, I was worried they would use gstreamer.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
                        Word is, it's working much better on netbooks. It's certainly loading faster and working smoother on my regular PC - I guess the difference will be more pronounced on slower machines.

                        Wrt the SQL database, it's the faster alternative. Any other implementation the nkew address bar would almost certainly be slower than SQLite.
                        It's not the type of database they use that I have a problem with, it's that a web browser needs one at all. I guess their new-for-3.x address bar features are kind of nice, but I hardly ever use them.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jeffro-tull View Post
                          It's not the type of database they use that I have a problem with, it's that a web browser needs one at all. I guess their new-for-3.x address bar features are kind of nice, but I hardly ever use them.
                          You've got to store the history information somewhere. I think an embedded DB makes a lot more sense than a plain text file or some kind of binary serialization when you are storing it for more than just a few days. We aren't talking about a full-blown server or anything, it's just an embedded DB which shouldn't add that much overhead.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
                            You've got to store the history information somewhere. I think an embedded DB makes a lot more sense than a plain text file or some kind of binary serialization when you are storing it for more than just a few days. We aren't talking about a full-blown server or anything, it's just an embedded DB which shouldn't add that much overhead.
                            On most of my rigs, I agree. My old AthlonXP and my Thinkpad T60 handled it just fine. My K10 rig is completely unphased by it. On those rigs, no complaints.

                            On my Aspire One, though... that SSD is ridiculously slow. Most of the time, Firefox runs just fine. But when I open up a new page or start typing away in the location bar, it goes unusable (as in "hangs with no apparent response to user input") for several seconds.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jeffro-tull View Post
                              On most of my rigs, I agree. My old AthlonXP and my Thinkpad T60 handled it just fine. My K10 rig is completely unphased by it. On those rigs, no complaints.

                              On my Aspire One, though... that SSD is ridiculously slow. Most of the time, Firefox runs just fine. But when I open up a new page or start typing away in the location bar, it goes unusable (as in "hangs with no apparent response to user input") for several seconds.
                              IMO that's not an issue with the DB, but with Firefox. If it's running a query that could take time, it shouldn't be blocking the UI like it does. I think FF has some limitations that make it difficult for a background thread to update the UI, which is why they need to do a better job ensuring that all the queries they run are instantaneous.

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