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Ext2Fsd: EXT3/EXT4 Support Now Works On Windows 8

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  • Ext2Fsd: EXT3/EXT4 Support Now Works On Windows 8

    Phoronix: Ext2Fsd: EXT3/EXT4 Support Now Works On Windows 8

    The Ext2Fsd project that provides an EXT3/EXT4 file-system driver for Microsoft Windows operating systems was recently updated with Windows 8 support and other changes...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTcyMjg

  • #2
    Well, the better solution would be using paragon ext driver, which actually IS a driver, and not like with ext2fsd, will integrate your ext partitions into windows system.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by startzz View Post
      Well, the better solution would be using paragon ext driver, which actually IS a driver, and not like with ext2fsd, will integrate your ext partitions into windows system.
      I have never heard of that software before, it is free too, i shall have to check it out

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      • #4
        Originally posted by startzz View Post
        Well, the better solution would be using paragon ext driver, which actually IS a driver, and not like with ext2fsd, will integrate your ext partitions into windows system.
        And its Still a Userspace Driver (Dokan). You need still a external program that mount the volumes and that tool crash immediately on most of my machines. And about ext2fsd, it leaves my Linux Partitions broken.

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        • #5
          Without extents support, this isn't much of an ext4 driver. Yes it's possible to use etx4 without extents, but who has an extent-less ext4 partition?

          That said, I did use this driver in the past with ext3 partitions, it worked fine for both reading and writing.

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          • #6
            So, why is there no progression of filesystem read/write support for open-source drivers on Windows?

            And please, no anti-this or that crepe. Cold, hard technical reasons.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by stiiixy View Post
              So, why is there no progression of filesystem read/write support for open-source drivers on Windows?
              Its easier to blame Microsoft, that they don't implement a FOSS Filesystem. Why would Microsoft do it?

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              • #8
                I may be totally wrong, but I assume that documentation for writing filesystem drivers for windows is inexistent, leaving people in the dark and guess how it works. And Microsoft ins not interested at all in letting people write their own, as they want you to use FAT32 and NTFS, more "patented" ans so more financially interesting.

                Anyway, if you have in hands a disk with ext partitions on it, you are better to go with a liveUSB with any linux distrib loaded, As the live system will permit you to read and write sercurely on all filesystems, including windows ones.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Morpheus View Post
                  I may be totally wrong, but I assume that documentation for writing filesystem drivers for windows is inexistent,
                  MSDN and a IFS SDK are exist. The only big problem in the past was UAC but thats since vista fixed.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by stiiixy View Post
                    So, why is there no progression of filesystem read/write support for open-source drivers on Windows?

                    And please, no anti-this or that crepe. Cold, hard technical reasons.
                    Its just that no one really needs that stuff. Windows has its own ntfs, exfat, fat32 filesystems, its more than enough for everything. And there really is no point in supporting so many linux home-made quality filesystems, that are all the time in alpha state, and before it reaches stable, it goes obsolete. And its better to use the whole package, you will not see anyone driving a car, that is build from 10 different car manufacturers parts.

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                    • #11
                      when I build a multi-booting system, I usually set aside 32 or 64G for a fat32 partition, this is usually plenty for file space that needs to be shared with windows, usually downloaded stuff, utilities, documentation etc.

                      more and more I simply run Windows in a VM, and then use SMB/CIFS or even winscp to copy files if needed.

                      however, a solid ext3/ext4 driver for windows that supports journalling would be nice, but maybe ZFS would be a good long term target instead?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by speculatrix View Post
                        but maybe ZFS would be a good long term target instead?
                        Only if ZFS gets a Kernel Implementation and not the crappy FUSE debris. (Thats also fits for Windows, a ZFS driver would be awesome but not as a dokan driver)

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by startzz View Post
                          Its just that no one really needs that stuff. Windows has its own ntfs, exfat, fat32 filesystems, its more than enough for everything. And there really is no point in supporting so many linux home-made quality filesystems, that are all the time in alpha state, and before it reaches stable, it goes obsolete. And its better to use the whole package, you will not see anyone driving a car, that is build from 10 different car manufacturers parts.
                          Car manufacturer's source parts (an there's 100's of thousands of them) from anyone and everyone when building their cars. Whoever can supply a part the cheapest. So the analogy is somewhat unfounded in my mind =) But I get your point.

                          And Window's FS' are not enough for everything. Otherwise we wouldn't have over a dozen more available for Linux/BSD now. Lustre, BTRFS, ZFS et al for eg. I'd use an open source filesystem over NTFS because I can go both ways with both OS's then. I have to use Windows here in Aus. There's no two ways about it if I wanna work in IT. To many people who just can't stand the idea of leaving Windows. Same with OS X. Having only Windows FS' on my Windows machine's makes my work just that little bit longer and annoying. I've lived with it long enough, but I am damn curious as to why it hasn't happend =D

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by speculatrix View Post
                            when I build a multi-booting system, I usually set aside 32 or 64G for a fat32 partition, this is usually plenty for file space that needs to be shared with windows, usually downloaded stuff, utilities, documentation etc.

                            more and more I simply run Windows in a VM, and then use SMB/CIFS or even winscp to copy files if needed.

                            however, a solid ext3/ext4 driver for windows that supports journalling would be nice, but maybe ZFS would be a good long term target instead?
                            ZFS at least is covered by patents isn't it, so that might be feasible if MS or anyone else wanted to do it. No idea if it's technically feasible as I've no idea how MS would handle other FS at the kernel or river levels.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Nille View Post
                              Its easier to blame Microsoft, that they don't implement a FOSS Filesystem. Why would Microsoft do it?
                              I'm not concerned with MS doing it, because they wont. I was just wondering why nobody else has done it, and what the reasoning for not doing it were. If it's to hard and too much work because all the MS stuff is shut down tight and the FS drivers need to dig deep in their kernel and the effort involved returns only minimal gains (who needs EXT4 on Windows? Well, I'd like it, but it's not necessary).

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