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OS X Is No Longer On My Main System, But I Already Have Regrets

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  • It's your fault

    XFCE is a lightweight UI, you should have known that; what you need is Unity or Gnome. As far as usability and Apps, I used Windows for 15 years and amassed quite a need for specific Software. I found replacements for EVERY thing in Linux and I'm proud to say I don't use Windows or Mac anymore; It's just me and trusty Xubuntu 12.04. It's a choice Michael, Microsoft's Slave Chains or the Freedom of Linux; obviously I choose my Freedom.

    You are complaining because you got locked in to Software. Your continued use of Mac will lock you even more into it's Software. You just have to bite the bullet and make a switch to dig yourself out of the hole that YOU put yourself into. It's not the fault of Linux that you did this to yourself.

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    • Originally posted by Mike Frett View Post
      XFCE is a lightweight UI, you should have known that; what you need is Unity or Gnome. As far as usability and Apps, I used Windows for 15 years and amassed quite a need for specific Software. I found replacements for EVERY thing in Linux and I'm proud to say I don't use Windows or Mac anymore; It's just me and trusty Xubuntu 12.04. It's a choice Michael, Microsoft's Slave Chains or the Freedom of Linux; obviously I choose my Freedom.

      You are complaining because you got locked in to Software. Your continued use of Mac will lock you even more into it's Software. You just have to bite the bullet and make a switch to dig yourself out of the hole that YOU put yourself into. It's not the fault of Linux that you did this to yourself.
      Easy tiger. Great lesson though. When will you be lecturing next?

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      • Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
        You don't get this kind of special treatment with Linux; everything goes to the bugzilla where you
        ... often get a response within minutes and if you're lucky a patch to test within an hour. Yes, this happens. Try reporting some bugs.

        Sometimes not, of course, then it sits there until someone who knows the hardware comes along, that happens too.

        But you don't compare the same things: Regularly giving money to microsoft vs. not paying anything.

        If you do want "special treatment" there are several companies that offer support contracts for linux like, you know, red hat etc.

        If you want the same thing, then try mailing microsoft: "Hey, I don't pay for windows, but I have a problem with hardware X." See, how long it takes them to fix the issue.

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        • Originally posted by chrisb View Post
          As others have already pointed out, you do get this kind of treatment if you buy a support contract. But I'll tell you a different story about what Microsoft support is like for ordinary developers..

          Years ago I was part of a group that had a project which involved some embedded Windows work on MIPS platform (some of my coworkers did this part). They found a bug: when debugging was disabled, one of the Windows libs was about 1000 times slower. It was unusable. But with debugging on it was ok. Microsoft said they wouldn't even look at the issue unless the equivalent of about $10k was paid upfront. The money was paid and the bug escalated to Microsoft's developers. They responded that it was an already known issue that they would not fix, even though this was still a commercially available and supported platform. The only workaround was to ship with debugging enabled, which had a performance hit, but was at least usable.

          Complain as you may about the open source bug trackers, at least you don't have to pay money upfront before a developer even looks at your bug. And if you do want to do that, then the option is there.
          Just now, in Visual Studio 2010, in debug you have the choice between:
          - builds will fail unless you build twice, or
          - edit and continue does not work.
          You might think both of these are useful for debugging, but the answer to the (acknowledged) bug is:
          "Fixed in VS 2012"
          Yay,

          Microsoft usually provides very polished tools, but it's not always perfect..

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          • Originally posted by erendorn View Post
            Just now, in Visual Studio 2010, in debug you have the choice between:
            - builds will fail unless you build twice, or
            - edit and continue does not work.
            You might think both of these are useful for debugging, but the answer to the (acknowledged) bug is:
            "Fixed in VS 2012"
            Yay,

            Microsoft usually provides very polished tools, but it's not always perfect..
            I don't think anyone here has ever claimed that Microsoft and its tools are perfect.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Cyber Killer View Post
              How can you not want to do at least a preliminary configuration to the tool that you want to use?! Computers are complicated machines, they are not something like a hammer (hell, even hammers come in a variety of sizes and shapes). You're doing it wrong.
              I think there's an invisible/magical/philosophical line that gets crossed somewhere. When I buy/rent/lease a car, I'm willing adjust the seat, mirrors, and wheel hight. I'd rather not have to choose between linear and logarithmic throttles, clutch height, steering gears, suspension mode, etc. I've done that in my rally days, and have a fair grasp of the fundamentals, but these days I just want to get my kids to/from school safely and quietly. I think it's nice that these options are available (and consolidated now that everything is drive by wire), but have no interest in them beyond having a sane default set and the options hidden from view.

              Ubuntu 14.04 just gave me the option of encrypting my home dir. At the risk of sounding like an ass who begins sentences with the word "actually", I think that the installer should be smart enough to determine whether some form of whole-disk encryption is already in use, and based its default on that, then hide the option in an advanced menu. It's like giving someone the option of a mechanical choke when they've already selected electronic fuel injection.

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              • Originally posted by russofris View Post
                I think there's an invisible/magical/philosophical line that gets crossed somewhere. When I buy/rent/lease a car, I'm willing adjust the seat, mirrors, and wheel hight. I'd rather not have to choose between linear and logarithmic throttles, clutch height, steering gears, suspension mode, etc. I've done that in my rally days, and have a fair grasp of the fundamentals, but these days I just want to get my kids to/from school safely and quietly. I think it's nice that these options are available (and consolidated now that everything is drive by wire), but have no interest in them beyond having a sane default set and the options hidden from view.

                Ubuntu 14.04 just gave me the option of encrypting my home dir. At the risk of sounding like an ass who begins sentences with the word "actually", I think that the installer should be smart enough to determine whether some form of whole-disk encryption is already in use, and based its default on that, then hide the option in an advanced menu. It's like giving someone the option of a mechanical choke when they've already selected electronic fuel injection.
                OK, since we are stuck with the car comparison anyway, let's take this from a different angle - installing a distro by yourself is similar to building your own car. If you'd buy a (properly) preinstalled Linux machine then the user config would be things like choosing your wallpaper and desktop widgets. Comparing the amount of work it takes to get a usable system starting with an install disk between windows and GNU, I say it's easier&faster to setup a working GNU system than windows.

                BTW: OpenSUSE detects already setup disk encryption during install and gives an option to use that.

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