Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

DragonFlyBSD Kernel Gets Major SMP Improvements

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #11
    Originally posted by tron_ston
    Doesn't matter, Linux still scales way better then both BSDs. Also, DragonflyBSD and community may still be slightly better then FreeBSD but they are still full of crap.
    It depends on the workload. Both Solaris and FreeBSD will outscale Linux at storage workloads on the Sun Fire X4540. You might be able to get close with ZFSOnLinux, but serialization by Linux's kernel virtual memory lock would probably keep its performance below other ZFS implementations until ZFSOnLinux switches its internal buffers from virtual memory to pages.

    Originally posted by tron_ston
    Look at want they are doing, they are just trying to make their OS like Linux. Why don't they just move to Linux instead make it better rather then wasting time and developing a rival knockoff of Linux and fragmenting the open source community?
    Linux is a clone of the UNIX System V kernel. You should not be criticize others as developing knock-offs when you like Linux.
    Last edited by ryao; 10-18-2013, 07:47 PM.

    Comment


    • #12
      Tried the daily USB image.
      It's in the "Gee, I wish I could use this" category:
      +starts fine (Acer Aspire One ZG5)
      +X works in the native resolution
      +Xfce by default
      +has just about any program you'll need (Firefox, VLC, Thunderbird...)
      +Has drivers for Atheros AR5xxx chips (kldload if_ath, afaict...)
      -I couldn't get the AR5007 in my laptop working.
      -doesn't recognize that the battery is charging
      -doesn't autoload drivers
      -lacks a graphical WPA/net config tool in the menus; it's RTFM and edit the configfiles.
      Not that I _mind_ that, but it's nice to have some way of getting things going...
      -if you want X at all, you need a 4G flash drive and 1 GB download, and you have to give it the whole flash drive.
      -CDE hasn't been ported yet

      Comment


      • #13
        Originally posted by Ibidem View Post
        Tried the daily USB image.
        -CDE hasn't been ported yet
        Here, here. It's still a benchmark you know.

        Comment


        • #14
          Originally posted by ryao View Post
          Linux is a clone of the UNIX System V kernel. You should not be criticize others as developing knock-offs when you like Linux.
          I thought it was inspired by MINIX?

          Comment


          • #15
            I would love to see some benchmarks with these changes. Also promising is Hammer 2 file system; would be interesting to contrast it with ZFS and BTRFS.

            Comment


            • #16
              Originally posted by BSDude View Post
              I thought it was inspired by MINIX?
              Linus used Minix to get the UNIX System V syscall codes, which Minix had mostly used. Linux has more in common with the UNIX System V kernel than Minix though. It is a monolithic kernel that has UNIX System V call codes, implements several UNIX System V system calls not present in other branches of UNIX, supports the original a.out executable format used in UNIX System V, etcetera.

              Comment


              • #17
                Originally posted by ryao View Post
                Linus used Minix to get the UNIX System V syscall codes, which Minix had mostly used. Linux has more in common with the UNIX System V kernel than Minix though. It is a monolithic kernel that has UNIX System V call codes, implements several UNIX System V system calls not present in other branches of UNIX, supports the original a.out executable format used in UNIX System V, etcetera.
                Although Linux originally used the filesystem from Minix.

                Comment


                • #18
                  Originally posted by Sergio View Post
                  Although Linux originally used the filesystem from Minix.
                  ...because it was originally intended as a bootable terminal emulation system, because the Minix terminal emulation sucked, and Linus needed a way to get files from the network onto his hard drive, where he had Minix installed.
                  Somewhere along the line it became his "GNU/Emacs of terminal emulation programs," and grew the syscalls needed to get a shell working.
                  IIRC, Linus borrowed a Sun manual because he couldn't afford the official POSIX documentation.

                  But eventually, folks got tired of the Minix FS limits, and started extending it. The two derivatives were Xiafs and the Extended file system.
                  The Extended fs (ext) was buggy, but it was replaced with a second revision (ext2). And we all know how that turned into Ext3 & Ext4.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X