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  • #46
    Originally posted by erendorn View Post
    Would such older, sub 1/2Gb RAM machines be "useful" in less developed countries, and would there be a demand there? (I don't refurbish and I don't live there so genuine question)
    1-2Gb, sure. We sell 1Gb all the time. But less than 1Gb? Eeeeeh... thats really pushing it. I don't live there but lets think about this for a second and just work through the "common sense" end of it... Even in less developed countries they still have to do much the same that we do here (office editting, internet connectivity if its available, things like that). And even putting "light" browsers on the machines doesn't help if they are going to "heavy" websites, much the same that putting "light" office suites on them doesn't help if they are editing a "heavy" documents. While they themselves may be 'frozen' or 'limited' in their technological advances they are MOSTLY LIKE still interacting and interfacing with the rest of the world that ISN'T limited.

    Put on light UI's, slim the kernel down as much as you can, use "light" apps all you want... there does still come a time when its just time to put these things out to pasture due to external factors and influences.
    Last edited by Ericg; 08-29-2013, 01:27 PM. Reason: Typo corrections.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Ericg View Post
      1-2Gb, sure. We sell 1Gb all the time. But less than 1Gb? Eeeeeh... thats really pushing it. I don't live there but lets think about this for a second and just work through the "common sense" end of it... Even in less developed countries they still have to do much the same that we do here (office editting, internet connectivity if its available, things like that). And even putting "light" browsers on the machines doesn't help if they are going to "heavy" websites, much the same that putting "light" office suites on them doesn't help if they are editing a "heavy" documents. While they themselves may be 'frozen' or 'limited' in their technological advances they are MOSTLY LIKE still interacting and interfacing with the rest of the world that ISN'T limited.

      Put on light UI's, slim the kernel down as much as you can, use "light" apps all you want... there does still come a time when its just time to put these things out to pasture due to external factors and influences.
      just something that has been annoying me, it's not really a big deal though...

      Gb = gigabit
      GB = gigabyte
      Gib = Gibibit
      GiB = Gibibyte

      1 gigabyte = 8 gigabits
      1 gibibyte = 8 gibibits

      I pretty sure that most of these references to Gb and Gib are actually intended to be GB. A half Gb is only 64MB. 1Gb is 128MB, 2Gb is 256MB.
      https://www.google.com/search?q=1%2F...ient=firefox-a
      Last edited by duby229; 08-29-2013, 02:03 PM.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by duby229 View Post
        even windows xp runs like crap on that amount of RAM, unless you've already stopped a bunch of services.
        It actually runs surprisingly well. Remember that it's time-frozen and has no network connectivity, so it shouldn't be running anything network-related, no antivirus/firewall software, has no updates installed etc. For the few tasks it's used, it still performs well.

        Also interestingly enough during a lightning storm its PSU got burned out a few years ago (it was a stock PSU, so no wonder). The PSU got replaced, and nothing else was affected, and it's still running as well as before that.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by duby229 View Post
          just something that has been annoying me, it's not really a big deal though...

          Gb = gigabit
          GB = gigabyte
          Gib = Gibibit
          GiB = Gibibyte

          1 gigabyte = 8 gigabits
          1 gibibyte = 8 gibibits

          I pretty sure that most of these references to Gb and Gib are actually intended to be GB. A half Gb is only 64MB. 1Gb is 128MB, 2Gb is 256MB.
          https://www.google.com/search?q=1%2F...ient=firefox-a
          Yes all of those SHOULD be GB not Gb, but I cant edit at this point sooooooooooo... yeah lol

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Ericg View Post
            1-2Gb, sure. We sell 1Gb all the time. But less than 1Gb? Eeeeeh... thats really pushing it. I don't live there but lets think about this for a second and just work through the "common sense" end of it... Even in less developed countries they still have to do much the same that we do here (office editting, internet connectivity if its available, things like that). And even putting "light" browsers on the machines doesn't help if they are going to "heavy" websites, much the same that putting "light" office suites on them doesn't help if they are editing a "heavy" documents. While they themselves may be 'frozen' or 'limited' in their technological advances they are MOSTLY LIKE still interacting and interfacing with the rest of the world that ISN'T limited.

            Put on light UI's, slim the kernel down as much as you can, use "light" apps all you want... there does still come a time when its just time to put these things out to pasture due to external factors and influences.
            Yeah, put these things out tp pasture. You know why those parts of the world are called developing? Because they have to develop infrastructure and economy. Which means for them: No, I will not throw away those old machine, just because I can't afford a newer one. I love those 1st world views on 3rd world problems.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Ericg View Post
              Yes all of those SHOULD be GB not Gb, but I cant edit at this point sooooooooooo... yeah lol
              Are you sure they shouldn't actually be GiB? Because memory is typically counted in GiB. Storage was counted in GiB when it was still small, nowadays it's usually counted in GB (I have my KDE set up to show me file sizes in GB, because that's easier to understand for users of the decimal system). Of course, Microsoft is not helping with the issue by incorrectly labelling GiB as GB etc. But at least Apple is also doing the right thing in that regard (and they also use GB for files).

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              • #52
                Storage, as far as I know, is counted as GiB, but is incorrectly marketed as GB. RAM is counted as GB and has always been correct. I have 4GB in my current computer and it is reported as 4GB.

                EDIT: MS usage of Gb isnt correct in either case, they count Kb as 1024 bits, but 1 Mb as 1000 Kb of 1024 bits
                Last edited by duby229; 08-29-2013, 04:30 PM.

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                • #53
                  Indeed disks are sold in GB's to make them look bigger, but Windows counts GiB's even though it displays GB.

                  I just built a computer with a 500GB Seagate harddisk and the number of bytes as displayed in BIOS was roughly 500 billion bytes, and not 536 billion (≈ 500 GiB).

                  But what do all these bytes have to do with Fedora and its graphics drivers?

                  I'm in favour of dropping these drivers. tdfx is already so broken that the CRT monitor on which I tested a 3dfx can't display anything but "out of range" (the card doesn't POST with my 1680x1050 flatpanel monitor connected).
                  Anyway, that was an ancient card which I sold to a "retro hardware" enthusiast for €5. I don't care about it, personally. Console worked so it's definitely X's fault.
                  Last edited by AlbertP; 08-29-2013, 04:52 PM.

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                  • #54
                    Actually I just realized that I got my definitions backwords... Sorry about that...

                    Just a correction...

                    kiB = 1024 bytes
                    kB = 1000 bytes.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by duby229 View Post
                      just something that has been annoying me, it's not really a big deal though...

                      Gb = gigabit
                      GB = gigabyte
                      Gib = Gibibit
                      GiB = Gibibyte

                      1 gigabyte = 8 gigabits
                      1 gibibyte = 8 gibibits

                      I pretty sure that most of these references to Gb and Gib are actually intended to be GB. A half Gb is only 64MB. 1Gb is 128MB, 2Gb is 256MB.
                      https://www.google.com/search?q=1%2F...ient=firefox-a
                      I refuse to go by hard drive manufacturer scales! My "3Tb" drives are 2.75Tb, as 8-bit bytes intended!

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Kivada View Post
                        I refuse to go by hard drive manufacturer scales! My "3Tb" drives are 2.75Tb, as 8-bit bytes intended!
                        First: It's not about the size of a byte (I don't know of other definitions than 8bit = 1 byte), it's about what "kilo" means. Traditionally "kilo" (prefix 'k' or 'K'), derived from the Greek word χίλιοι (chilioi), meaning "thousand" (see Wikipedia), is used to describe 1000 * 'base unit'. In computer science "kilo" (prefix 'k' or 'K') is historically used to describe 1024 * 'base unit'.
                        To solve this ambiguity the IEC proposed the "binary prefixes" (Ki for binary kilo -> 1024 * base).
                        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilobyte

                        Also: It's not only the drive manufacturer labeling it in misleading way. The file system takes some bytes too (e.g. reserved root space in ext fs, fs meta data, ...).

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