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Rustboot: A 32-Bit Kernel Written In Rust

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  • Rustboot: A 32-Bit Kernel Written In Rust

    Phoronix: Rustboot: A 32-Bit Kernel Written In Rust

    Rust, the general purpose programming language developed by Mozilla for being a safe, concurrent, and practical language, can even be used to write a system kernel...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM3OTQ

  • #2
    Developer from Mozilla considered to write Heka - a server software to collect data - in Rust. But they decided that this language was not ready yet, so developed it in Go instead

    https://blog.mozilla.org/services/20...roducing-heka/

    quote from a developer comment:
    @Mateusz: Yes, in fact, we did take a look at Rust. And, were Rust farther along, we might have ended up using it, it would be a good choice. But Rust is still evolving a bit too rapidly for production software, and the tools aren’t as developed. I think Rust is an exciting project with a lot to offer, but it’s not quite ready for most uses.
    I heard that Rust is quite complex already. For example it has four different types of pointers!

    other Rust programs:
    https://github.com/Jeaye/q3 - a Quake III clone in development
    https://github.com/pcwalton/sprocketnes - NES emulator
    Last edited by Fenrin; 05-27-2013, 01:42 PM.

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    • #3
      Think if someone made something like Emscripten for Rust.
      Or a source-to-source compiler that transcode from C to Rust.

      Then ported the Linux kernel to Rust...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Fenrin View Post
        I heard that Rust is quite complex already. For example it has four different types of pointers!
        It doesn't have any more pointer types than C or C++, it just enforces memory safety so the different uses of a pointer are separated in the type system: ~ for an owned memory allocation, @ for a garbage collected allocation, & for references.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          Then ported the Linux kernel to Rust...
          I would rather them port it to Intercal, PLEASE.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Fenrin View Post
            I heard that Rust is quite complex already. For example it has four different types of pointers!

            other Rust programs:
            https://github.com/Jeaye/q3 - a Quake III clone in development
            https://github.com/pcwalton/sprocketnes - NES emulator
            Also worth nothing is angolmois-rust, which is a direct port of a C program.

            Anyway, it does have four pointer types, raw pointers, and 3 types of safe/smart pointers. They correspond to unique_ptr, shared_ptr, and (I think) auto_ptr from the STL, but without any runtime overhead (except for @-ptrs). Having these pointer types baked into the language enables rust's main feature: safety at a low cost. That cost is effectively

            It's possible to write code that looks (and performs) much like C just using raw pointers and unsafe code. In some cases it's actually better because Rust does some aliasing analysis, which lets LLVM generate better code.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by TheBlackCat View Post
              I would rather them port it to Intercal, PLEASE.
              +1. Why didn't Intercal ever take off is beyond me.

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              • #8
                Rust has been around for a few years now
                Not in any usable form, if I understand correctly. It's now at 0.6 but 0.4 was only released last October.

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