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  • #16
    Originally posted by Amzo View Post
    Actually, first of all, the project is using BSD userland, there was someone who attempted the same but with a GNU userland which has long died.

    The reason I started this project, which some may not agree with, was the lack of binary packages that were outdated in FreeBSD repos and to change the initsystem to something more modern.

    Basically, the project was to user a new package manager (pacman) and to use a new initsystem ( OpenRC ) and things have been going well.

    A few other important changes are:

    PKGBUILD and makepkg work with FreeBSD ports in a jail, this saves effort of compiling outside the port tree and having to setup a lot of system variables to keep them prefixed in /usr/local to keep to BSD standards

    The benefit to this is ease, and you can also override variables in PKGBUILD such as LDFLAGS, CFLAGS, CONFIGURE etc to set any options you otherwise would when building outside the port tree.


    I know most people on this Forum are anti-BSD, but this was a personal project for me, to change some of the things I disliked about FreeBSD.
    Hi there,
    This project looks more interesting than some of the others as you're still using the FreeBSD userland, also I quite like the way pacman operates.
    I just wanted to know, what will be the default compiler for this system and will you be basing this off the STABLE or CURRENT FreeBSD release?

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    • #17
      Archbsd is a waste of time and the people using/making it must die

      Originally posted by amzo View Post
      actually, first of all, the project is using bsd userland, there was someone who attempted the same but with a gnu userland which has long died.

      The reason i started this project, which some may not agree with, was the lack of binary packages that were outdated in freebsd repos and to change the initsystem to something more modern.

      Basically, the project was to user a new package manager (pacman) and to use a new initsystem ( openrc ) and things have been going well.

      A few other important changes are:

      Pkgbuild and makepkg work with freebsd ports in a jail, this saves effort of compiling outside the port tree and having to setup a lot of system variables to keep them prefixed in /usr/local to keep to bsd standards

      the benefit to this is ease, and you can also override variables in pkgbuild such as ldflags, cflags, configure etc to set any options you otherwise would when building outside the port tree.


      I know most people on this forum are anti-bsd, but this was a personal project for me, to change some of the things i disliked about freebsd.

      zomfg amzo, seriously fucking stop fucking ur time with bsd serious just kill urself!!!! Or use linux 100%.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Amzo View Post
        Actually, first of all, the project is using BSD userland, there was someone who attempted the same but with a GNU userland which has long died.

        The reason I started this project, which some may not agree with, was the lack of binary packages that were outdated in FreeBSD repos and to change the initsystem to something more modern.

        Basically, the project was to user a new package manager (pacman) and to use a new initsystem ( OpenRC ) and things have been going well.

        A few other important changes are:

        PKGBUILD and makepkg work with FreeBSD ports in a jail, this saves effort of compiling outside the port tree and having to setup a lot of system variables to keep them prefixed in /usr/local to keep to BSD standards

        The benefit to this is ease, and you can also override variables in PKGBUILD such as LDFLAGS, CFLAGS, CONFIGURE etc to set any options you otherwise would when building outside the port tree.


        I know most people on this Forum are anti-BSD, but this was a personal project for me, to change some of the things I disliked about FreeBSD.
        First, the anti-BSD stuff were some childish rotten apples and definitely not representative. I think most here are rather fond of diversity. Really neat that you are going for a "real" FreeBSD base + updated init + pacman. That sets you apart from the "kFreeBSD" distros.

        I hope you get a community expanding the AUR. This is after all one of the coolest things with Arch - anyone can contribute without asking permission first.

        some stuff on the webpage:
        Wiki: broken link
        Download: still refers to Arch linux

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by staalmannen View Post
          First, the anti-BSD stuff were some childish rotten apples and definitely not representative. I think most here are rather fond of diversity. Really neat that you are going for a "real" FreeBSD base + updated init + pacman. That sets you apart from the "kFreeBSD" distros.

          I hope you get a community expanding the AUR. This is after all one of the coolest things with Arch - anyone can contribute without asking permission first.

          some stuff on the webpage:
          Wiki: broken link
          Download: still refers to Arch linux

          Yeah, I am aware somethings are working yet. I only setup the website yesterday, wasn't expecting it to be 'leaked' so to speak, but I guess it an't really be helped.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Cthulhux View Post
            Someone please tell the dev how pkg_add works.
            Can it uninstall a package with all packages that depend on it? I tried it a few years ago, first with the binary packages, but then I realized that the binaries were severely out of date and not even synchronized with the ports tree, so I wanted to uninstall gtk, so that everything from xfce would get removed but I couldn't find in the documentation how to do it.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by nightmarex View Post
              Stachlinux, now that's interesting.
              Yeah I am excited too

              One essential package that needs to work first before I migrate is "schroot". That way I could use a static "core" os and then seamlessly run a dynamic Arch in schroot (including X11 stuff) for big and complex stuff that would be horrible to try to build statically.

              Ps. Oh by the way - if I ever had a say about a mascot I would vote for a Mr. Potato variant of Tux, but perhaps I am the only one that would appreciate such a pun Ds.
              Last edited by staalmannen; 01-24-2013, 03:30 AM.

              Comment


              • #22
                So, Amzo, what is the benefit of pacman towards pkgng?

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Cthulhux View Post
                  So, Amzo, what is the benefit of pacman towards pkgng?
                  pkgng wasn't around when I started the project and FreeBSD 9.1 lacks pkgng packages .

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Of course, as it is still a beta.

                    That's why I am wondering if there is any benefit of Arch BSD.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Amzo View Post
                      I know most people on this Forum are anti-BSD, but this was a personal project for me, to change some of the things I disliked about FreeBSD.
                      Nah, no more than BSD anti-Linux crowd. Why didn't you choose much modern DragonflyBSD kernel instead?

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Amzo View Post
                        Actually, first of all, the project is using BSD userland, there was someone who attempted the same but with a GNU userland which has long died.

                        The reason I started this project, which some may not agree with, was the lack of binary packages that were outdated in FreeBSD repos and to change the initsystem to something more modern.

                        Basically, the project was to user a new package manager (pacman) and to use a new initsystem ( OpenRC ) and things have been going well.

                        A few other important changes are:

                        PKGBUILD and makepkg work with FreeBSD ports in a jail, this saves effort of compiling outside the port tree and having to setup a lot of system variables to keep them prefixed in /usr/local to keep to BSD standards

                        The benefit to this is ease, and you can also override variables in PKGBUILD such as LDFLAGS, CFLAGS, CONFIGURE etc to set any options you otherwise would when building outside the port tree.

                        I know most people on this Forum are anti-BSD, but this was a personal project for me, to change some of the things I disliked about FreeBSD.
                        OpenRC is a RC system, not an init system. Unless you have adopted sysvinit, you are likely using the FreeBSD init system with OpenRC on top.

                        Originally posted by kraftman View Post
                        Nah, no more than BSD anti-Linux crowd. Why didn't you choose much modern DragonflyBSD kernel instead?
                        DragonflyBSD takes a different approach to kernel design than FreeBSD, but it is by no means more modern. FreeBSD has both DTrace and ZFS. DragonflyBSD has neither.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Amzo View Post
                          Actually, first of all, the project is using BSD userland, there was someone who attempted the same but with a GNU userland which has long died.

                          The reason I started this project, which some may not agree with, was the lack of binary packages that were outdated in FreeBSD repos and to change the initsystem to something more modern.

                          Basically, the project was to user a new package manager (pacman) and to use a new initsystem ( OpenRC ) and things have been going well.

                          A few other important changes are:

                          PKGBUILD and makepkg work with FreeBSD ports in a jail, this saves effort of compiling outside the port tree and having to setup a lot of system variables to keep them prefixed in /usr/local to keep to BSD standards

                          The benefit to this is ease, and you can also override variables in PKGBUILD such as LDFLAGS, CFLAGS, CONFIGURE etc to set any options you otherwise would when building outside the port tree.


                          I know most people on this Forum are anti-BSD, but this was a personal project for me, to change some of the things I disliked about FreeBSD.
                          Cool, thanks for explanation, this is really GREAT news, and I sincerely wish ArchBSD the best in all of its future endeavours.
                          The best of the Linux distro's (namely, at the least, one of the very best) being Arch, which I luv, with the *BSD/Unix, my first luv. (that is, OpenBSD, and FreeBSD -and in that order).

                          It's a marriage that may help bear very fruitful results, one of them being, that ALL hardware manufacturers hopefully, and finally, start turning around and working even MORESO with BSD/Linux, at all levels, drivers', firmware,..., -did you HEAR that AMD/ATI Catalyst ?

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by ryao View Post
                            DragonflyBSD takes a different approach to kernel design than FreeBSD, but it is by no means more modern. FreeBSD has both DTrace and ZFS. DragonflyBSD has neither.
                            Dragonfly is what BSD system should be. FreeBSD was using Linux threads in the past, but switched to much worse and slower solution. It was using GCC and now it's using slow llvm. I would consider Dtrace and zfs as tech preview, so they're meaningless. Dragonfly has modern file system unlike FreeBSD which has legacy and crappy UFS. Dragonfly is also much faster, because it's using Linux principles.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by scjet View Post
                              It's a marriage that may help bear very fruitful results, one of them being, that ALL hardware manufacturers hopefully, and finally, start turning around and working even MORESO with BSD/Linux, at all levels, drivers', firmware,..., -did you HEAR that AMD/ATI Catalyst ?
                              Keep dreaming. BSD is meaningless, because it's dead.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                So much about the questions why the Linux fan trolls had not posted here yet.

                                Comment

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