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DragonFlyBSD 3.2.1 Battles Against Linux For Speed

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  • #16
    Originally posted by ArchLinux View Post
    Uhh.. no?

    They are called that because some of their services live in user space.
    Which services live in user space on DragonFlyBSD?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Pallidus View Post
      who the fuck runs bsd??

      their drivers suck even more (if that's possible)

      the versions of common shit like firefox and chromium are lagging behind.

      gnome 2? lol wtf
      Imagine you were a Linux user who is surfing a Windows forum, and you see a post like yours, only with 'Linux' instead of 'bsd' and 'gnome 3' instead of 'gnome 2'.
      You would think that dude is an utterly ignorant douche.

      As a side note, Firefox is at 16.0.2, the current version upstream. Chromium may not be at the current upstream version(I haven't checked), but this is rather due to the linuxisms making it hard to port.
      Last edited by BitRot; 11-05-2012, 03:47 PM.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ryao View Post
        When these kernels are called hybrid kernels, they are usually called that because they support loadable modules. They can still be compiled as strictly monolithic kernels and they behave no differently than "true" monolithic kernels once loaded. As far as the developers working on them are concerned, they are monolithic kernels.
        No, thats called a modular monolithic kernel. DFBSD kernel is a hybrid because it utilizes microkernel like(but more lite) message-passing and protected memory. Message-passing is used for communication between CPUs. It's monolithic in structure, but employs some microkernel features inside the monolithic kernel, hence hybrid.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by ArchLinux View Post
          They are called [a hybrid kernel] because some of their services live in user space.
          Even linux has or can have some of its services run in user space, of course (e.g. filesystems).

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          • #20
            Originally posted by JanC View Post
            Even linux has or can have some of its services run in user space, of course (e.g. filesystems).
            Yeah, but I meant none of these are included in the kernel.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by ArchLinux View Post
              Yeah, but I meant none of these are included in the kernel.
              ...
              Of course, because kernel is not user space.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by LightBit View Post
                ...
                Of course, because kernel is not user space.
                I think he means in the kernel sources (which does contain some userspace code; mainly simple utilities).

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by JanC View Post
                  I think he means in the kernel sources (which does contain some userspace code; mainly simple utilities).
                  It doesn't have to be.


                  Linux is hybrid kernel, because most Linux distributions have udevd service running in user space.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by LightBit View Post
                    Linux is hybrid kernel, because most Linux distributions have udevd service running in user space.
                    I guess you could say that. I couldn't even get opinions about this in stackoverflow because my question wouldn't have a "factual answer".

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                    • #25
                      Would be interested in seeing some benchmarks of this new release against other BSDs and Linux other than those for Postgres.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by LightBit View Post
                        Linux is hybrid kernel, because most Linux distributions have udevd service running in user space.
                        By the way, this is a totally inane argument (I guess the "rolleyes" was there to depict that). Using your logic you could say nobody cares about BSD simply because most people don't.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Sergeax View Post
                          By the way, this is a totally inane argument (I guess the "rolleyes" was there to depict that). Using your logic you could say nobody cares about BSD simply because most people don't.
                          Calling kernel a hybrid is inane, because most of modern OS's can be called hybrid by definition. It is meaningless.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by kill BSD
                            BTW

                            Do you know that the biggest use of BSD is running Servers which host pr0n?
                            Great, they usually serve the highest amount of traffic. I bet Linux geeks are the biggest users.

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