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GNOME 3.x Shell Isn't Yet Primed For FreeBSD

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Fenrin View Post
    in gnome 3 it isn't alt+F2. Either the super key (under Windoze systems this key is called "Windows key") or via the mouse movement to the right-hand top side. But it's right that another key combination works as well, but I don't use it.
    More accurately, on Gnome3, the Alt-F2 command gives you a prompt for running an executable, not dissimilar to the same prompt in Gnome2. Whereas the Windows key activates the mode for (among other things) selecting and opening an application by name, much quicker than using the mouse or keyboard to navigate the old Gnome 2 application menu.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
      Gnome 3 -out of the box- is stupid beyond repair.

      Who on earth had the fuckin idea to make it require more clicks and navigation for a task than previous versions.
      When it comes to minimizing/maximizing windows and other things you would typically do on other desktop environments, don't. You're a lot better off just leaving windows maximized, and using CTRL+ALT+Up/Down to switch workspaces in order to make room on the screen.

      You can't use Gnome 3 the way you use Windows/KDE/XFCE/LXDE. If you can't get used to the way Gnome 3 was designed, which is understandable, you're much better off using something else. But don't get wrapped up in your own distortion reality field and categorize Gnome 3 as broken beyond repair. It certainly has flaws and some poor design decisions, but it was well thought out in the way it was designed.

      I'm not saying Gnome 3 is better, though I personally like it better than any other desktop environment out there, including Windows and OSX, but it was designed a certain way. You need to forget the way you managed windows and do things Gnome 3 was designed for you to do. Otherwise, yes, you will fucking hate it.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Fenrin View Post
        IMHO navigating through a KDE or xfce menu to find and open a application takes longer than pressing the super key, entering the first few letters of application name and return. And alternatively it's also very easy to click on a application in the favorite bar to open it.
        It's strange, because that sounds exactly like how i use the menu in KDE. Open it, type a couple letters to find the app, press enter to start it. Or click the app from the favorites list that shows up by default...

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        • #19
          Gnome Shell has improved quite a bit over the past year. I really enjoyed using it on my brothers laptop running Fedora 17, especially with the extensions capability.

          That being said, I am running Xfce as my main desktop on my main machine as it supports Zaphod Mode. I will be looking to see if Xfce 4.10 fixes a couple of the issues I have found with it though.

          I am currently also typing this with LXDE. It has also really improved over the past year. It is now quite polished and stable.

          Things are good.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Vax456 View Post
            When it comes to minimizing/maximizing windows and other things you would typically do on other desktop environments, don't. You're a lot better off just leaving windows maximized, and using CTRL+ALT+Up/Down to switch workspaces in order to make room on the screen.
            Luckily features like minimizing, maximizing, etc. can be reenabled and the rest can be changed via extensions and tweaks. I've always tweaked any other DE to my liking anyway, so it's no problem. I never liked any DE "out of the box".

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Redi44 View Post
              Am I the only one who likes Unity (GNOME)?
              You're not, I like it too

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              • #22
                Originally posted by jacob View Post
                You're not, I like it too
                What has Unity to do with Gnome btw.?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by halo9en View Post
                  I disagree. After trying countless desktop environment alternatives (even the most exotic ones), from lightweight to tiling and beyond, with an eye to usability and the other to performance, memory & power usage, I decided to give another try to the "big and bloated" ones. KDE is worse than I remembered - cute but horribly slow and memory hungry. Gnome 2 was a bit better (performance wise) but I still liked Xfce and Openbox more. I always stayed away from Gnome 3 because I didn't like the idea of having a javascript/css engine behind its shell, plus it was GNOME... but I decided to try it and, honestly, it's the best and most functional DE I have tried to date.
                  You should try kdebase/kdebase-meta on Gentoo with USE=-semantic-desktop. It is lean and fast.

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                  • #24
                    I don't like gnome for various reasons.

                    It takes longer to boot, yes, KDE takes even longer but XFCE is almost instant in comparison to gnome.
                    Design choices, both usability and configuration, its a nonsensical nightmare.
                    Gnome shell needs 3d accel, gnome "classic" is constrained to the extreme and highly deprecated.
                    To make gnome3 usable, it would take considerable time tweaking, extending, etc. Defeating the purpose of a ready made DE.

                    Freebsd is not missing anything without gnome3, people used to gnome2 can switch to Xfce without any fuzz, and will even find it easier to do things, since there is no stupid gconf or alike and instead you have a proper gui with options.

                    Cinnamon or Unity as shell replacement might solve the usability issues somewhat, but its still gnome3 behind, lots of harm there in the memory/gpu usage department.

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                    • #25
                      Yesterday I tried the latest gnome-shell for the first time. Without exaggeration, it is the worst DE I have used. It is far behind all other DE's.

                      In case you're wondering, I use xfce myself... (In the past used KDE mostly, and I also like the latest Unity, but it needs to be polished even more).

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                      • #26
                        GNOME3 restored my faith in Linux desktop. It's slick, fast, well designed, modern, functioal, has good defaults, and compared to KDE mightily is stable despite being so young project. The features and settings are not all there yet, but I like how GNOME team really thinks what they are doing unlike KDE team, which just throws random shit on it and hope it works. For example changing application icon size or removing window title when maximized takes only one line change in gnome-shell.css. One extension took care of that transition animation after pressing meta. Functionality is there, but devs haven't apparently just decided how to put it into GUI in a sane way. I like that way of doing things.

                        I was on brink of buying a Mac or two, but GNOME 3.2 gave second thoughts. Right now I think GNOME3 > OS X > Windows 8 > Windows 7 > GNOME2 > XFCE > LXDE > KDE.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by daedaluz View Post
                          GNOME3 restored my faith in Linux desktop. It's slick, fast, well designed, modern, functioal, has good defaults, and compared to KDE mightily is stable despite being so young project. The features and settings are not all there yet, but I like how GNOME team really thinks what they are doing unlike KDE team, which just throws random shit on it and hope it works. For example changing application icon size or removing window title when maximized takes only one line change in gnome-shell.css. One extension took care of that transition animation after pressing meta. Functionality is there, but devs haven't apparently just decided how to put it into GUI in a sane way. I like that way of doing things.

                          I was on brink of buying a Mac or two, but GNOME 3.2 gave second thoughts. Right now I think GNOME3 > OS X > Windows 8 > Windows 7 > GNOME2 > XFCE > LXDE > KDE.
                          I like the shell's design, smoothness and performance, but I've noticed MANY bugs with certain parts of gnome 3. mainly empathy, gnome-contacts, and gnome-online accounts are a buggy mess for me, feels like beta software.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by daedaluz View Post
                            GNOME3 restored my faith in Linux desktop. It's slick, fast, well designed, modern, functioal, has good defaults, and compared to KDE mightily is stable despite being so young project. The features and settings are not all there yet, but I like how GNOME team really thinks what they are doing unlike KDE team, which just throws random shit on it and hope it works. For example changing application icon size or removing window title when maximized takes only one line change in gnome-shell.css. One extension took care of that transition animation after pressing meta. Functionality is there, but devs haven't apparently just decided how to put it into GUI in a sane way. I like that way of doing things.

                            I was on brink of buying a Mac or two, but GNOME 3.2 gave second thoughts. Right now I think GNOME3 > OS X > Windows 8 > Windows 7 > GNOME2 > XFCE > LXDE > KDE.
                            Isn't Windows 8 designed for mobile phones with touch screens? I cannot imagine myself sitting in the office and grabble around on my monitor (would get stiff arms)

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