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Haiku OS Advances With New Official Release

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  • Haiku OS Advances With New Official Release

    Phoronix: Haiku OS Advances With New Official Release

    The Haiku operating system, which seeks to be free software and implement compatibility with the BeOS platform, has now experienced its third official release in ten years of development. Haiku R1 Alpha 3 is this new official release and it offers a lot of changes...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTU4MA

  • #2
    GCC 2.x?? Really?

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    • #3
      PAE? is it a 32 bit OS only?
      Anyway, maximum respect for the defunct BeOS and for the guys reviving it nowadays

      is it possible to think of a future for this OS outside the small group of nostalgic? I mean, if after 20 years of honorable history, even Linux hasn't made a breakthrough on the desktop world... it's very likely that Haiku will go no further than Linux. Maybe it will find new life in the mobile world (tablets, in car entertainment, smart-TV...)
      Netrunner Linux - Rolling Release ; Nexus 5 ROM Chroma 5.1 ; NAS 6TB on FreeNAS

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      • #4
        Yeah, Haiku got stock in the early 90's. It's 32bit-only, single user. They say it's fast though, but so is Windows 95 :P

        PS:
        GCC 2 must be some kind of joke.
        Last edited by RealNC; 06-20-2011, 09:24 AM.

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        • #5
          Uh well... being 32 bit only, single user, and devoted to the desktop (BeOS was born with the desktop as a the priority target) I find it hard to imagine a future in nowadays mobile world. Unless Haiku breaks the compatibility with BeOS legacy...
          Netrunner Linux - Rolling Release ; Nexus 5 ROM Chroma 5.1 ; NAS 6TB on FreeNAS

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          • #6
            GCC2

            From what I understand, GCC and the Linux kernel are so heavily intertwined that it is becoming bad thing for both projects.

            So, I guess thins kind of thing is understandable when other operating systems try to utilize the GCC compiler.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by TeoLinuX View Post
              Uh well... being 32 bit only, single user, and devoted to the desktop (BeOS was born with the desktop as a the priority target) I find it hard to imagine a future in nowadays mobile world. Unless Haiku breaks the compatibility with BeOS legacy...
              I think that's the plan ("break compatibility with BeOS legacy"), but not until R2 (which is a ways off).

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              • #8
                Originally posted by eric.frederich View Post
                From what I understand, GCC and the Linux kernel are so heavily intertwined that it is becoming bad thing for both projects.
                What ?

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                • #9
                  I welcome any new open source and community driven project. So I like Haiku.
                  But I even like more those projects aimed at bringing innovation, especially in user experience. So I just hope that Haiku could become what Wayland has become with respect to X: an advanced (c)lean project aimed at offering the best user experience on modern hardware.
                  In the end, wasn't BeOS born aiming at offering the snappiest experience on desktops, and sporting native multimedia capabilities in a time in which bloated and legacy tied-up OSes were struggling to follow the evolution of desktop user needs?
                  Netrunner Linux - Rolling Release ; Nexus 5 ROM Chroma 5.1 ; NAS 6TB on FreeNAS

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                  • #10
                    its nice to see a hobby os coming together after 10 years in development

                    i would be glad to give it a try in a VM if my computer could be used as something more than a web browser

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TeoLinuX View Post
                      PAE? is it a 32 bit OS only?
                      Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                      GCC 2 must be some kind of joke.
                      For Haiku 1.0 the developers target close to 100% BeOS compatibility. As you may have forgotten, with GCC 3.0 the C++ ABI was changed which means that all C++ applications had to be recompiled in order to work again. For that reason Haiku is so far at least stuck with GCC 2 and 32 Bit mode.
                      However, Haiku is built to be compilable with GCC 4. It's just not the supported way to do. As for compilation as 64 bit OS: Could be that that's possible, too, but again not officially supported. I don't know about this, though.

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                      • #12
                        There has been some work done on 64bit support however the drivers have not been ported and such so no you can't build it as 64bit yet... but it is on the TODO list.

                        For what its worth Haiku has been compiled with LLVM by a few people however I don' think it is directly supported by the build system yet.

                        So you might say that GCC2 support is a good thing as it means the code is portable. Pfft netbsd still buits on GCC2 after all and its gets respect seriously don't diss an OS cause it supports MORE compilers.
                        Last edited by cb88; 06-20-2011, 12:24 PM.

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                        • #13
                          According to a poll asking for what was a requirement for ending R1, was Gallium3D and WPA (and some other things).

                          I think any OS should now ditch GCC for EkoPath anyway, especially because Linux only needs one tiny patch and EkoPath supports GnuC anyway.

                          Anything not x86 or Itanium? LLVM for the long run. Gnu gives two fingers to standards. I mean... GNU C? WTF... Non-complience and bugs everywhere...

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                          • #14
                            Ah, the fun of hobby OSes. If this is how a small group of hackers want to spend their time, they're more than welcome to.

                            I personally wish they'd work on Linux or a Linux-based desktop suite, but hey, I can't tell them what to do with their spare time.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
                              I think any OS should now ditch GCC for EkoPath anyway, especially because Linux only needs one tiny patch and EkoPath supports GnuC anyway.
                              Except that EkoPath is literally chock full of internal bugs and errors, even when trying to compile unoptimized plain C code with no hand-coded assembler.

                              For instance, today I tried to compile liblcms2 and got a bunch of really cryptic errors about the output of their x86_64 code generation, something about the wrong number of operands for an instruction! And from following #pathscale in IRC, it seems that these kinds of problems are extremely common, everyone is experiencing them, and the PathScale devs don't react to this kind of inquiry.

                              For instance, I asked for help there with my liblcms problem and was silently ignored, even though I provided a pastebin link to the compiler output and described what I was trying to do. lcms is an integral part of many desktop applications, because it has utility functions used by, e.g. the libopenjpeg decoder. And I don't think that lcms triggering a bug in pathcc's codegen is an outlier; it's closer to the norm.

                              Also it's been a week since Larabel spilled the beans on EkoPath and they still haven't pushed the code. How hard is it to host a tarball or open a new github repo? I mean, I totally understand if they're trying to get permission to redistribute third-party code, but if the copyright is all theirs, it should be a no-brainer, taking a couple of hours at the most to assemble the files and push them. They could at the very least make a distribution of the ekopath binaries without the trialware / license activation nonsense and just make it freeware for the time being.
                              Last edited by allquixotic; 06-20-2011, 06:57 PM.

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