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Autonomously Generating An Ideal Kernel Configuration

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  • Autonomously Generating An Ideal Kernel Configuration

    Phoronix: Autonomously Generating An Ideal Kernel Configuration

    While most Linux users are fine with just using the kernel supplied by their distribution vendor, there are some enthusiasts and professional users who end up tweaking their kernel configuration extensively for their needs, particularly if they are within a corporate environment where the very best performance and reliability is demanded for a particular workload...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODE0MA

  • #2
    wohahahaaaawwwww the performance god speaks to us..

    in detail this will bring linux to the haven of performance!

    nice!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post
      wohahahaaaawwwww the performance god speaks to us..

      in detail this will bring linux to the haven of performance!

      nice!
      Gentoo Linux users have been by modifying .config file settings by hand to get improved kernel performance for a long time. I do not think automating it will do much for Linux performance, although this will probably save time for Linux users that were already doing this sort of thing.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Shining Arcanine View Post
        Gentoo Linux users have been by modifying .config file settings by hand to get improved kernel performance for a long time. I do not think automating it will do much for Linux performance, although this will probably save time for Linux users that were already doing this sort of thing.
        Gentoo VS save time

        if i use Gentoo my time is 'burn'

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        • #5
          Michael I think your work is very useful for the linux environment.
          The kernel developers can look for performance regressions in the Linux kernel with phoromatic, and now distribution maintainers can see what are the best kernel configuration options for the kernel.

          Hope more people involved in linux development have a look at phoromatic.


          P.S.:I'm also waiting to test my Windows XP performance vs. LInux performance.

          Comment


          • #6
            As was said above, as a Gentoo user, I've been configuring mine manually for years but I still occasionally get caught out when I forget to enable an option that's really required. I have found that this is the part that new Gentoo users find the most intimidating. Having said that, I think it's a great way to get a tour of the Linux insides and find out just what it's doing for you.

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            • #7
              Brilliant! Can't wait to try this feature out.

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              • #8
                Hi Michael

                Would it be possible to create a utility that looks at the output of lspci and lsusb and creates a simple cut down kernel config with only the bare minimum required switched on?

                Your new module could then use this as the basis for the testing, it would also massively decrease the time it takes to recompile each kernel

                Regards

                Mike

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
                  Hi Michael

                  Would it be possible to create a utility that looks at the output of lspci and lsusb and creates a simple cut down kernel config with only the bare minimum required switched on?

                  Your new module could then use this as the basis for the testing, it would also massively decrease the time it takes to recompile each kernel

                  Regards

                  Mike
                  I'm sure I could come up with something to make it work like that to optimize it even further in terms of what modules are needed based upon the current hardware, but I probably wouldn't end up investing that much time into this module unless it becomes financed by a PTS Commercial client.
                  Michael Larabel
                  http://www.michaellarabel.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post
                    Gentoo VS save time

                    if i use Gentoo my time is 'burn'
                    Nothing stops you from using Gentoo Linux and using this to automate the creation of your kernel .config file.

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                    • #11
                      Be sure to accumulate this information into your tests aswell.

                      http://www.paradoxuncreated.com/arti...illennium.html

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post
                        Gentoo VS save time

                        if i use Gentoo my time is 'burn'
                        Nice... xD

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
                          Would it be possible to create a utility that looks at the output of lspci and lsusb and creates a simple cut down kernel config with only the bare minimum required switched on?
                          That's what I was thinking of when I read the headline. That would actually be quite interesting, and would serve both kernel performance and security.

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                          • #14
                            Not that useful for common user who wants a pre-built kernel though. For them almost everything is modularized and loaded either via initrd or on boot. Thus pretty much everything is compiled. They're just not compiled into the kernel.

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                            • #15
                              Yeah it might sounds useful but to me a fulling working distro with vanilla kernel and doing what it is supposed to do, with no crashing and no major usability issues is what I really want, unfortunately non of current distros does that.

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