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Autonomously Finding Performance Regressions In The Linux Kernel

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  • #31
    Originally posted by misiu_mp View Post
    Autonomous (btw, why not automatic) regression testing is super useful.
    How about extending it for regression testing wine with a set of windows programs? This could at least test for crashes. You could add automatic screen shots to get some of the functionality testing done too.
    http://test.winehq.org/data/

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    • #32
      Originally posted by znmeb View Post
      This is awesome! Can anyone just run this, or do I need to buy something?
      It's all open-source, but this module is just not something you can "just run". First you need to create a build script for whatever you wish to test, then module-setup bisect option to set all of the options, etc. Documentation for it will come once everything has been stabilized and new features added in. Of course, normal phoronix-test-suite is extremely easy to use and free.
      Michael Larabel
      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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      • #33
        Originally posted by misiu_mp View Post
        Autonomous (btw, why not automatic) regression testing is super useful.
        How about extending it for regression testing wine with a set of windows programs? This could at least test for crashes. You could add automatic screen shots to get some of the functionality testing done too.
        Ordered list, setup, test, fulcrum.

        The screenshot testing is a considerably more difficult, and really needs application support to do it nicely.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Michael View Post
          It's all open-source, but this module is just not something you can "just run". First you need to create a build script for whatever you wish to test, then module-setup bisect option to set all of the options, etc. Documentation for it will come once everything has been stabilized and new features added in. Of course, normal phoronix-test-suite is extremely easy to use and free.
          Thanks! I've spent the last week or so doing Iozone testing on openSUSE 11.2 RC1 and I've automated as much of it as I can. But your suite is better than Iozone. ;-)

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          • #35
            Originally posted by znmeb View Post
            Thanks! I've spent the last week or so doing Iozone testing on openSUSE 11.2 RC1 and I've automated as much of it as I can. But your suite is better than Iozone. ;-)
            Too bad you didn't discover:

            Code:
            phoronix-test-suite benchmark iozone
            A week ago
            Michael Larabel
            http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Michael View Post
              Too bad you didn't discover:

              Code:
              phoronix-test-suite benchmark iozone
              A week ago
              I actually did discover Phoronix a few months ago, tweeted and blogged about how wonderful it was, then promptly forgot about it and moved on to something completely different - social media analytics research. ;-) It's only been since openSUSE 11.2 Milestone 8 that I've started to care about Linux I/O performance again. ;-)

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              • #37
                Originally posted by znmeb View Post
                I actually did discover Phoronix a few months ago, tweeted and blogged about how wonderful it was, then promptly forgot about it and moved on to something completely different - social media analytics research. ;-) It's only been since openSUSE 11.2 Milestone 8 that I've started to care about Linux I/O performance again. ;-)
                As an OT diversion, do you have any references to your social media analytics research?

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by mtippett View Post
                  As an OT diversion, do you have any references to your social media analytics research?
                  http://borasky-research.net/smart-at-znmeb

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                  • #39
                    @Michael

                    Why there are ia32-libs "needed" in PTS while I'm using 64bit OS (Kubuntu 9.10)?

                    When I wanted to install pgbench test, PTS wanted my password to install ia32-libs. I typed it and then, there was such error:

                    sudo: apt-get -y --ignore-missing install ia32-libs: command not found

                    however test is installed and working, but every time I want to run it, it displays this:

                    The following dependencies will be installed:
                    - ia32-libs

                    This process may take several minutes.
                    sudo: apt-get -y --ignore-missing install ia32-libs: command not found

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                    • #40
                      @kraftman:

                      Some of the tests (particularly some of the games) require some of the ia32-libs, so I just added that check on there if running 64-bit to always fetch those 32-bit libs. However, for Ubuntu 9.10 and others where it is no longer present, I will make a workaround.
                      Michael Larabel
                      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Michael View Post
                        @kraftman:

                        Some of the tests (particularly some of the games) require some of the ia32-libs, so I just added that check on there if running 64-bit to always fetch those 32-bit libs. However, for Ubuntu 9.10 and others where it is no longer present, I will make a workaround.
                        Thank you

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Michael View Post
                          @kraftman:

                          Some of the tests (particularly some of the games) require some of the ia32-libs, so I just added that check on there if running 64-bit to always fetch those 32-bit libs. However, for Ubuntu 9.10 and others where it is no longer present, I will make a workaround.
                          command not found sounds more like it's not finding apt-get, not that ia32-libs is not there.

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                          • #43
                            There's a small mistake in the article:

                            All that this PTS module needs to know is the starting and end points that return a different state, an accessible repository (Git, currently) to be tested to be tested,

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by mirza View Post
                              Wait, this means that if I want to have consistent data on ext4 I must look at 5x slower PostgreSQL and other write-intensive applications? And proposed solution is either obscure mount switch with possibility of occasional file corruption or really _slow_ PostgreSQL. WTF?
                              ... Or get a battery-backed SATA controller, like 3Ware's RAID cards.

                              Although as others have said, it's the write cache in the disk that's the problem so only hard power-loss can cause the corruption that this change prevents. If you have a UPS, you can run with nobarrier. Linux crashing won't stop the disk from performing the buffered writes. (at least AFAIK. Is that true even if the crash causes a machine reset? i.e. on typical x86 hardware, does the system reset signal do anything that could flush the write buffer in a SATA hard drive?)

                              If Linux just locks up and stops sending SATA commands, you're fine, because the disk will finish processing its queue.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by llama View Post
                                ... Or get a battery-backed SATA controller, like 3Ware's RAID cards.

                                Although as others have said, it's the write cache in the disk that's the problem so only hard power-loss can cause the corruption that this change prevents. If you have a UPS, you can run with nobarrier. Linux crashing won't stop the disk from performing the buffered writes. (at least AFAIK. Is that true even if the crash causes a machine reset? i.e. on typical x86 hardware, does the system reset signal do anything that could flush the write buffer in a SATA hard drive?)

                                If Linux just locks up and stops sending SATA commands, you're fine, because the disk will finish processing its queue.
                                unless you mount the partition with the sync option it is not safe to run without barriers even with a UPS.

                                if te kernel goes haywire it may just stop sending commands, or it may lock up the SATA bus (or send garbage to the drive)

                                but you are absolutly right that if you want good database performance you need battery backed cache, a 7200 rpm drive can only do ~160 seperate writes/sec, anytime you get numbers much higher than that you are seeing buffering take place, and if you don't have a battery on that buffer it means that a power failure could end up with things written in the wrong order, which may not be recoverable.

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