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  • #16
    This is a question I've always Pondered. Linux has been missing this for over a decade!

    For instance, Imagine a real time database driven website that visually advocates Linux friendly hardware. Be it on specific distros or kernel version etc.. All the details could be finely thought out and easily accessible.

    Ie:

    A rating of compatibility:
    • What drivers are available: Binary Blob, Open Source, etc...?
    • What kernel versions are supported, 2.6, 2.4 etc...?
    • Maybe a star rating showing how well this hardware is supported overall?
    • Cost and country specific availability.
    • User comments / reviews ala Amazon with it's rating system...
    • Links to various external information ala Wikipedia references: Ie drivers etc...
    • Performance in Linux, since fast hardware in windows != fast hardware in Linux.
      • Infact even a comparison since some people duel boot.
    Maybe more features could be thought of? Hey, you could even start your own computer business selling LINUX hardware! =D Or was that your intention.. haha

    I'm not 100% confident with say Amazon. As I'm seeing this as an external medium. People can buy hardware all over the place. Though I'm sure competition would arise on Amazon once a website is initialised. That might not be a bad thing.

    Be carefull though. Money could be offered by companies to uprate their product. ~~here is *big wad of money* because our product is just so awesome... hint hint~~ Or poor review killed us, SUE! ... I'd be annoyed about that.

    Go for it!

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    • #17
      I'd love to see entire linux-running systems, especially laptops. No more windows-tax , and not having to go through the difficulty of getting the system installed and perfectly working. Oh, and as you won't have to worry about windows-support, you could also start doing things normal vendors won't do, like using coreboot
      And ARM-based devices...

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      • #18
        this is a great a idea

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        • #19
          Well a couple of questions I have is:

          As far as this goes, how is this any different then the existing HCL's out there other then a link to the product for amazon? The biggest problem with this kind of list is keeping them up to date. Say someone has a piece of hardware that is not yet supported by linux but 3-4 months is, who is going to guarantee that the review, link, compatibility is up to date? Fedora and opensuse for example already uses smolt for checking if a piece of hardware is supported. I like the idea (although I admit I find shopping locally much cheaper then through newegg or amazon) but the biggest problem is that many of these attempts never go back to update the reviews and product once a product is supported.

          http://www.smolts.org/reports/device_ratings

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          • #20
            If you're going to do this

            If you're going to do this, only products that have 100% functionality with mainline in-kernel drivers (kernel.org) should be listed.

            Anything else just becomes a variable crap-shoot.

            For example, Nvidia cards are out (3D not working), Broadcom chipsets in WiFi and Bluetooth, etc.

            I don't need / want to know what will work with proprietary drivers.

            This will also provide an incentive to manufacturers to get off their rear ends and get their drivers upstream.

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            • #21
              100% functionality with mainline kernel drivers? is that a joke? there goes every stand-alone video card currently on the market. every motherboard with an nvidia or amd igp, intel poulsbo based motherboards... etc.

              sorry, but thats just not a realistic requirement.

              i'll chime in once more saying you should work something out with newegg - that would be awesome.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by AdrenalineJunky View Post
                100% functionality with mainline kernel drivers? is that a joke? there goes every stand-alone video card currently on the market. every motherboard with an nvidia or amd igp, intel poulsbo based motherboards... etc.

                sorry, but thats just not a realistic requirement.

                i'll chime in once more saying you should work something out with newegg - that would be awesome.

                That's the way I buy my hardware now. That you're not aware of the options indicates it's a good reason to do it.

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                • #23
                  I have to second the people that have mentioned they would probably only use it as a service for discovering FOSS friendly products, and then subsequently shop around for the best price.

                  So in that regard, Phoronix probably wouldn't end up reaping a significant amount of revenue from a shop like this, because Amazon and its partners often don't have the best prices and warranty packages. So unless you plan on having truly competitively priced offerings, I'd say that it's not worth it, only because you won't get the financial returns that you might hope for.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by macemoneta View Post
                    If you're going to do this, only products that have 100% functionality with mainline in-kernel drivers (kernel.org) should be listed

                    ...

                    I don't need / want to know what will work with proprietary drivers.
                    Are you willing to speak for every linux user? Or pay the money they would bring in? No? Then quit demanding. You're in no position to.


                    This will also provide an incentive to manufacturers to get off their rear ends and get their drivers upstream.
                    Oh yeah! I can imagine PhoronixStore go on-line and the manufacturers going: "Oh no! Phoronix doesn't list our hardware as compatible with Linux! What ever are we going to do???" and of course then the entire boards of directors will commit mass suicides. Yep. That's how it's going to be.

                    /s

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by macemoneta View Post
                      That's the way I buy my hardware now. That you're not aware of the options indicates it's a good reason to do it.
                      I would really like to know what video card you bought that has 100% fully featured and compatible support and as well has the same performance levels in linux as it does in windows.

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                      • #26
                        very interesting...

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                        • #27
                          For me it would have to be amazon.ca (in addition to amazon.com). It'd find it most useful for Wi-Fi cards, TV cards, and laptops - graphics cards, and Intel/AMD/Nvidia chipsets are high profile enough that it's fairly easy to determine their compatibility. CPU's and internal hard drives can be assume to always work. Sound, network and storage cards are trickier but most of them work with Linux.

                          Originally posted by deanjo View Post
                          I would really like to know what video card you bought that has 100% fully featured and compatible support and as well has the same performance levels in linux as it does in windows.
                          Old out of production ATI cards? For stuff still in production and readily available new, I think the Intel IGP is the closest - it's OK for 2D users and old games, but it's useless (on either Windows or Linux) for running modern games, or for professional 3D applications.
                          Last edited by RagingDragon; 08-20-2009, 08:13 PM.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by RagingDragon View Post
                            For me it would have to be amazon.ca (in addition to amazon.com). It'd find it most useful for Wi-Fi cards, TV cards, and laptops - graphics cards, and Intel/AMD/Nvidia chipsets are high profile enough that it's fairly easy to determine their compatibility. CPU's and internal hard drives can be assume to always work. Sound, network and storage cards are trickier but most of them work with Linux.



                            Old out of production ATI cards? For stuff still in production and readily available new, I think the Intel IGP is the closest - it's OK for 2D users and old games, but it's useless (on either Windows or Linux) for running modern games, or for professional 3D applications.
                            Even the intels are crippled in performance because of reliance on mesa. Also features such as HDCP compliance, etc are not implemented in linux as well (and most likely never will have those capabilities). Then there is also items like S3 texture compression that are to contend with as well. I do not know any video card that is fully featured and has the same performance levels as their windows drivers have. Every card out there that are still being sold has some crippled capabilities when it comes to linux especially when used with FLOSS drivers.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by macemoneta View Post
                              That's the way I buy my hardware now. That you're not aware of the options indicates it's a good reason to do it.
                              you assume far too much, both about me and about linux users in general.

                              saying i'm not aware if what hardware works with mainline kernel because i pointed out the fact that you would be needlessly limiting a ton of hardware that either works out of the box, or can be setup with a few simple clicks on the vast majority of disto's is absurd.

                              i'm aware of what the full opensource options are, simple truth is, they all suck. sure, they may be fully supported on opensource drivers, but the hardware itself sucks. and assuming that because you feel that way phoronix should cater to you is also absurd.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by macemoneta View Post
                                If you're going to do this, only products that have 100% functionality with mainline in-kernel drivers (kernel.org) should be listed.

                                Anything else just becomes a variable crap-shoot.

                                For example, Nvidia cards are out (3D not working), Broadcom chipsets in WiFi and Bluetooth, etc.

                                I don't need / want to know what will work with proprietary drivers.

                                This will also provide an incentive to manufacturers to get off their rear ends and get their drivers upstream.
                                why not make 2 rating systems.. green star for opensource drivers black star for cloused source drivers `?? ?

                                like this 1 greenstar for an working driver 1 green star for an fast working driver 1 greenstar for an fullfeatured driver 1 greenstar for an userfrendly driver and one for the overall best in this year..


                                5 greenstars *****2009 for exampel also the most ratet hartware in 2009

                                the same with the blackstars so you can diverend easly if you want clouses source drivers.

                                for an exampel an amd vga vs an nvidia vga.
                                nvida become an 4 or 5 black star but only 1 greenstar..
                                amd become 3-4 greenstars but only 3-4 blackstars..
                                intel becomes 4-5 greenstars but no blackstar..

                                there is no need to battle nvidia only makes clear thats nvidia do not have opensource drivers.

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