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Next Week's Kernel Summit Will Try To Take On The 2038 Problem

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  • Next Week's Kernel Summit Will Try To Take On The 2038 Problem

    Phoronix: Next Week's Kernel Summit Will Try To Take On The 2038 Problem

    Taking place next week is the Linux Kernel Summit in Chicago alongside the 2014 LinuxCon North America. We'll be providing live coverage next week while one of the early kernel summit sessions already being discussed online is a goal of trying to further the Linux solution to the year 2038 problem...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTc2Mjg

  • #2
    There should be no 32bit CPUs by then.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Pepec9124 View Post
      There should be no 32bit CPUs by then.
      Or switch from i386/i686 to x32, the past 5-10 years the requirements for an OS are pretty much the same, so while i686 is buggy and too limited, x32 should be OK for at least a few decades.

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      • #4
        x32 needs a 64-bit cpu though. Also some computers from 30 years ago are still being used for some tasks. 32-bit platforms of today will still be used by a few 30 years from now. They might make up 0.000000000.........1 percent of computers but still.

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        • #5
          They could break compatibilité for Linux 4! And computers from 30 years ago certainly won't run 3.16 anyway...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by My8th View Post
            x32 needs a 64-bit cpu though. Also some computers from 30 years ago are still being used for some tasks. 32-bit platforms of today will still be used by a few 30 years from now. They might make up 0.000000000.........1 percent of computers but still.
            That few users certainly don't matter.
            Support for 20+ years Intel CPUs has been dropped from Linux already, phoronix link, old GPUs have also been banned from Mesa (phoronix covered it extensively), so Linux isn't extremely backwards compatible, which is good.

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            • #7
              This isn't rocket science. Double the data size and force user space to update. We have 24 years to get ready, those that can't don't deserve to be running Linux.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
                This isn't rocket science. Double the data size and force user space to update. We have 24 years to get ready, those that can't don't deserve to be running a recent version of Linux.
                Unfortunately there a decision taking ultra-conservative morons who won't take this for an answer.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Pepec9124 View Post
                  There should be no 32bit CPUs by then.
                  32 bit CPU can do computations on 64 bit ints...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Pepec9124 View Post
                    There should be no 32bit CPUs by then.
                    Did you read the article? This is addressed in like the first paragraph.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Pepec9124 View Post
                      There should be no 32bit CPUs by then.
                      Let me quote from the article you didn't read:
                      So 2038 brings the end of time for 32bit architectures. It being some
                      twenty four years ahead, it may seem like there is plenty of time for folks
                      to migrate to 64bit architectures that are (mostly) unaffected by this
                      issue. However, 32bit processors are still being produced today in
                      extremely high volumes, and many of those systems are being used in
                      commercial, industrial and medical environments, where these systems may be
                      quite literally embedded into the walls and machinery and are expected to
                      run for 25 years or more. As these small systems become more and more
                      pervasive, the risks of major trouble in 2038 grow. And thatās to say
                      nothing of the impact on future classic-car resale prices for fancy cars
                      like the Tesla when the high end in-dash display wonāt work (gasp!).

                      Thus, the ājust upgrade to 64bitā solution isnāt really sufficient,

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ncopa View Post
                        Let me quote from the article you didn't read:
                        I guess I need a ban.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Pepec9124 View Post
                          There should be no 32bit CPUs by then.
                          Sure there will be. The Motorola 6800k and Intel i386 are still produced simply because they are very power efficient DSP chips. Same with lower end PPC and ARM chips.

                          At the end of the day, there's really only two solutions: Either force users to use a 64-bit type, or re-index the time type. Both break capability somehow.

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                          • #14
                            In a student project two-three years ago I have made a GPS tracker on an 8-bit ATmega. So 32-bit processors will probably live till 2100.

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                            • #15
                              It must be pretty hard for them Linuxers to see that OpenBSD was first in quite anything.

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