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Unifont 7.0 Update Covers The Unicode 7.0 Basic Multilingual Plane

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  • Unifont 7.0 Update Covers The Unicode 7.0 Basic Multilingual Plane

    Phoronix: Unifont 7.0 Update Covers The Unicode 7.0 Basic Multilingual Plane

    Following last month's release of Unicode 7.0, the GNU Unifont project is out with an open-source glyph for each printable code point in the Unicode 7.0 Plane 0 standard...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTczNjQ

  • #2
    "Open source"? Really?

    Don't make such jokes with the GNU project.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by amp3030 View Post
      Don't make such jokes with the GNU project.
      What do you mean?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by m4tx View Post
        What do you mean?
        The GNU project tends to place more restrictions on the material it produces (Via the GPL 3.0 among other things) than even closed-source software. Hence questioning whether or not it's really "Open Source".

        (Just translating for you, not my personal opinion)

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        • #5
          The GNU project strives for freedom. The term Free Software is what they use for the software they develop, with "free" referring to the freedom (not price). The term open source, coined several years after the start of the GNU project by a sub-group inside the original free software movement, does not reflect the issue of freedom and looks at the matter as merely a better way of software engineering that leads to higher quality software. In contrast, the GNU project, and the free software movement in general, care about the essential human right of freedom when a user runs a piece of software. These are four freedoms explained here.

          Legally speaking, "free software" and "open source software" are almost always the same. However, they refer to different ideologies. Those who fight for software freedom don't want the message to be hidden under a business-friendly term such as "open source" and hence stress their values wherever they see a possibility. In this case, since this software was part of the GNU project, it is not fair to call it by a term that they don't like.

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          • #6
            The GNU project

            The GNU project strives for freedom. The term Free Software is what they use for the software they develop, with "free" referring to the freedom (not price). The term open source, coined several years after the start of the GNU project by a sub-group inside the original free software movement, does not reflect the issue of freedom and looks at the matter as merely a better way of software engineering that leads to higher quality software. In contrast, the GNU project, and the free software movement in general, care about the essential human right of freedom when a user runs a piece of software. These are four freedoms explained here.

            Legally speaking, "free software" and "open source software" are almost always the same. However, they refer to different ideologies. Those who fight for software freedom don't want the message to be hidden under a business-friendly term such as "open source" and hence stress their values wherever they see a possibility. In this case, since this software was part of the GNU project, it is not fair to call it by a term that they don't like.

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            • #7
              If someone else is wondering what the font looks like: http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/unifont/unifo...ont-7.0.03.bmp (2MB)

              Itís too bad itís a bitmap font, but could still be useful I guess.

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