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  • Windows is dying

    I was tired of reading the forum about FreeBSD dying. The obvious fact is that Windows is dying.

  • #2
    True.

    In two months Windows 8 was only able to accumulate 2% desktop market share.

    Wait... isn't that double what all the Linux distros have combined after two decades of work?

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    • #3
      I particularly liked the news headline about how Win8 is behind Vista adoption at the same time after launch of each.

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      • #4
        Windows is not dying. But it is rapidly becoming less relevant.
        Asymco reported on this already a year ago: http://www.asymco.com/2012/01/17/the...nal-computing/

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        • #5
          Windows will die when pigs grow wings and fly.

          Just Visual Studio, Microsoft SQL Server and Active Directory are more than enough to keep Windows alive as both a client and server operating system for another two decades at the very least. And those are only 3 of many other top-grade Windows-only software that Microsoft has published for Windows.

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          • #6
            oh lawd

            How stupid can you get?
            http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/01/...with-microsoft

            Anti-Trust anyone? The only modernization they need is Ubuntu.

            Wait a minute, Buzz Wordy is on the horn telling me everything is magically possible with Server 2012 and SharePoint.

            Country is going to shit.

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            • #7
              Windows will die when pigs grow wings and fly

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              • #8
                your argument proves the point

                Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
                Windows will die when pigs grow wings and fly.

                Just Visual Studio, Microsoft SQL Server and Active Directory are more than enough to keep Windows alive as both a client and server operating system for another two decades at the very least. And those are only 3 of many other top-grade Windows-only software that Microsoft has published for Windows.
                They call it "the legacy effect" or "coasting" or "rely on customers with long development cycles".

                By this same criterion FORTRAN and COBOL are still "very much alive". There is lots and lots of "top-grade COBOL-only software" out there. "Top grade" means it's been 10 years since anyone has found a bug in it.

                "top-grade Windows-only software" = same old same old attempt to "lock in" customers. SCREW industry standards, SCREW the customer too! Hint: the customer is learning!

                Really if what you say is best argument you have, you are basically agreeing: Windows is in the same state as COBOL and FORTRAN.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by frantaylor View Post
                  They call it "the legacy effect" or "coasting" or "rely on customers with long development cycles".

                  By this same criterion FORTRAN and COBOL are still "very much alive". There is lots and lots of "top-grade COBOL-only software" out there. "Top grade" means it's been 10 years since anyone has found a bug in it.

                  "top-grade Windows-only software" = same old same old attempt to "lock in" customers. SCREW industry standards, SCREW the customer too! Hint: the customer is learning!

                  Really if what you say is best argument you have, you are basically agreeing: Windows is in the same state as COBOL and FORTRAN.
                  My job is to get things working as expected of me. What you see as 'legacy effect' is what the real world calls 'staying with what always works'.

                  I can't be bothered to give a flying rat's rear if it involves getting locked in and spitting in the face of established standards. If I use Product A and it's supplier (let's called it Supplier A) happens to publish a crapton of good, powerful proprietary software that are specially designed to work with and only with Product A, i'd be crazy NOT to use it. Take the religious war over standards away from where I am; I don't welcome it one bit.


                  If Product A and Supplier A are in really deep trouble there will be clear signs of its struggling to remain relevant. And right now Microsoft is no where near struggling with its gigantic hegemony that Windows and its enterprise umbrella of software applications that it is sitting on. Just for the record, Windows Server 2012 is proving unexpectedly popular with its integrated Hyper-V solutions and Microsoft is having enough troubles scheduling enough conferences and demonstrations for WS 2012 simply because the response is much greater than expected. I have been locked out of registering for WS 2012 events for so many times now because all available places have been completely snapped up before I could even make my reservation. And just a few months back Microsoft's SQL Server 2012 won an award for Best RDBMS or something along those lines. And anybody who has used Windows 8 with a Start launcher replacement has got nothing but good things to say about the new operating system.

                  If that's what you call a dying business I'd want to be part of that business for the next 2 decades. And anybody who thinks that Microsoft's business only consists of client versions of Windows is clearly living in the 90s.

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                  • #10
                    Just let Aaron Contorer, senior management Microsoft's head of C++ development, speak:
                    Originally posted by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Criticism_of_Microsoft#Vendor_lock-in
                    The Windows API is so broad, so deep, and so functional that most Independent Software Vendors would be crazy not to use it. And it is so deeply embedded in the source code of many Windows apps that there is a huge switching cost to using a different operating system instead... It is this switching cost that has given the customers the patience to stick with Windows through all our mistakes, our buggy drivers, our high TCO (total cost of ownership), our lack of a sexy vision at times, and many other difficulties [...] Customers constantly evaluate other desktop platforms, [but] it would be so much work to move over that they hope we just improve Windows rather than force them to move. In short, without this exclusive franchise called the Windows API, we would have been dead a long time ago.
                    Of course windows will not die in the near future but for some reason they got so much public criticism in the last few months that there is a real chance that they lose enough so that linux can get actually significant "market share".

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