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What Are The Biggest Problems With Linux?

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  • Originally posted by birdie View Post
    We are talking about Linux here, right? Have I ever said Windows is flawless?
    No, you said about some problems of Linux like No high quality open source NVIDIA and AMD drivers. But this drivers exist anywhere? No. Then why it's a Linux problem? Why you doesn't write something like "No high quality open source ProTools replacement" in this list? It doesn't exist anywhere anyway - it can't be Linux problem.
    You said I can stand for everything that's written there but in fact you can't (anyone may click this link and see this).
    Originally posted by birdie View Post
    You act like a loudmouth but what have you done for Open Source?
    Goebbels spech style? Really?
    Originally posted by birdie View Post
    I'm here to just criticize and nothing else
    This ^
    http://phoronix.com/forums/search.ph...st&showposts=1
    Originally posted by birdie View Post
    What's even funnier about you is that you are subscribed to some of bug reports mentioned in the wicked list of Linux deficiencies.
    You too. So what?
    Originally posted by birdie View Post
    And can you please stop using bold text?
    I doesn't need to.
    Originally posted by birdie View Post
    Windows is more or less perfect - it just works.
    You really doesn't use Windows.
    Last edited by RussianNeuroMancer; 06-12-2012, 06:27 AM.

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    • You really need to get back to Russian Linux forums and speak Russian, as your English is so poor when you are trying to contradict me or argue with me, nothing good or meaningful comes out of it. ;-)

      What's even funnier as a proof of your own veracity you link to your own posts which are superficial at best ("I say so thus I'm right" - no links, no testaments, no evidence, nada - with such an attitude you may want to defend Christianity or any other religion - it's exactly how religious devotees act). This is the last time I reply to your messages, you may keep doing what you do best - shout out loud and advertise me - I like it. :-)


      Meanwhile I will try to address real concerns shared by people here.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by birdie View Post
        What's even funnier as a proof of your own veracity you link to your own posts which are superficial at best
        What's even funnier as a proof of your own veracity you link to your own page (four times per thread) which are full of bullshit.

        birdie as usually nothing to asnwer.

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        • Originally posted by scottishduck View Post
          Linux, like NT and Darwin, is a hybrid kernel. That's why you have the option to modularise a lot of Linux when you build it from source.
          Linux is a monolithic kernel and that's it!
          Guess why when you need a printer driver that the Kernel doesn't have support for you have to compile the entire kernel?

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          • Printer drivers are not in the kernel. Somehow my trust for this Bachelor of Science's abilities just dropped

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            • Originally posted by linux5850 View Post
              Linux is a monolithic kernel and every time they update it it can break many things. That's why micro-kernels are better and device drivers should be in user space not kernel space.
              Linux does support some types of userpace drivers with a stable API. If you are doing anything with and IRQ you need the privileged space to do it, but there are ways to put a lot of the driver functionality into user-space.

              For instance the FUSE system, some of the HID and bluetooth are done in userspace. Also it's not uncommon for embedded systems to make use of the user-pace driver API, like broad-com with the graphics driver for the rasberry pi. .

              Linux breaks internal API's and ABI's all of the time. In fact so do those other OS's. They keep thier drivers working by having a set of defined interfaces that they take great pains to maintain. The additional abraction makes the job of the kernel developers that much more complex. Instead of just being able to change the kernel, they have to change the kernel and then chage the shim, and so on.

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              • Originally posted by kraftman View Post
                It wasn't clear how should they be called:

                http://www.systhread.net/texts/200510kdiff.php
                You're pretty much expressing the same thing, but in another different host ... I would expect some significant functionality of the kernel to be offloaded to userland and not the hybrid kernels reduced to only loadable-modules which is stated to alter the kernel image on the fly, but it doesn't change for example that practically all core drivers are still provided in ring 0 except for some cute piece of software (like FUSE, anyone using it for the entire FS? lol ).

                But the fact is, that "Linux" (the OS, not the kernel) as it is is flexible enough to provide a edge-case scenario of a somewhat hybrid system ...

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                • Re

                  Originally posted by curaga View Post
                  Printer drivers are not in the kernel. Somehow my trust for this Bachelor of Science's abilities just dropped
                  I mean, if the support is not available in CUPS. I have an old printer at home and I had to recompile the kernel with the printer drivers as a module.
                  The same thing happened with my web camera, I had to recompile the kernel with the drivers downloaded from the site as a module...

                  And btw, I said that my Bachelor of Science is related to Printer drivers or something like that?
                  I am sure even Linus Torvalds can get wrong in something he never was interested in studying and that's not a big deal.
                  I am not a cyborg.

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                  • Names are very important.
                    The open source world seems to have a lot of problems coming up with good names without unintended negative effects.

                    Gimp: gimping, google it or rather don't (has other more common meaning)
                    OpenRISC: seriously? if you design an instruction set even if it's a RISC instead of CISC you do not give it a name with the word RISC in it!!

                    Here something I discovered:
                    http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-0...l-science.html
                    Last edited by plonoma; 06-12-2012, 09:10 AM.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by WorBlux View Post
                      Linux does support some types of userpace drivers with a stable API. If you are doing anything with and IRQ you need the privileged space to do it, but there are ways to put a lot of the driver functionality into user-space.

                      For instance the FUSE system, some of the HID and bluetooth are done in userspace. Also it's not uncommon for embedded systems to make use of the user-pace driver API, like broad-com with the graphics driver for the rasberry pi. .

                      Linux breaks internal API's and ABI's all of the time. In fact so do those other OS's. They keep thier drivers working by having a set of defined interfaces that they take great pains to maintain. The additional abraction makes the job of the kernel developers that much more complex. Instead of just being able to change the kernel, they have to change the kernel and then chage the shim, and so on.
                      API's/ABI's are the set of defined interfaces!!
                      A good programming practice is to separate interfaces and internal workings of components.

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                      • Also, too many papercut-type things like this:
                        https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ClipboardPersistence

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                        • Originally posted by plonoma View Post
                          Bloat is not a problem. Having a few hundred megabytes of libraries on a large HDD or SSD is really not so bad if it means you can run old and new programs.
                          LOL.

                          You do realise that 90+% of Linux systems are not hulking desktops with terabytes of disk space? In fact, 90% of that 90% probably have less than 'a few hundred megabytes' of storage in total.

                          Stable APIs are one of the the reasons why Windows is such a nightmare. I can only presume that Microsoft are pushing people to cripple Linux by imposing the same nonsense on it.

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                          • Originally posted by movieman View Post
                            Stable APIs are one of the the reasons why Windows is such a nightmare. I can only presume that Microsoft are pushing people to cripple Linux by imposing the same nonsense on it.
                            Stable KBI will never happen ... out of the politically correct technical argument, you have the political influence on it (Yes, it's about out-of-tree modules). pretty much the same applies to ABI

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                            • Originally posted by finalzone View Post
                              Distributions choose to enable/disable those drivers and rarely run the default vanilla Linux kernel setting depending of the architecture. My point still stands about generalizing Linux as a whole because of variables like distributions. Would you build a kernel with x86_64 driver enabled on an ARM architecture?
                              I'm not talking about drivers here; I'm talking about changes to the root kernel that have the net effect of dropping HW support to many not-so-old hardware configurations. To me, this indicates the Kernel itself is held together with little more then duct tape and chewing gum.


                              Originally posted by kraftman View Post
                              That's simply not true, because it's a hybrid kernel like many other OSes. It rarely breaks things. If you upgrade your kernel in Windows, OS X, BSD it doesn't break anything? That's kind of bullshit you stop writing about. You should be grateful you can upgrade your kernel while you consider it's something wrong...
                              ...Really? You don't update the Windows Kernel when you do a windows update; heck, even SP releases don't touch the kernel that much. Its the outside modules/drivers that receive updates. And even then, how many people over the years have had problems installing one Windows SP or another?

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                              • Originally posted by gamerk2 View Post
                                I'm not talking about drivers here; I'm talking about changes to the root kernel that have the net effect of dropping HW support to many not-so-old hardware configurations. To me, this indicates the Kernel itself is held together with little more then duct tape and chewing gum.
                                Uh, no. It tells you that Linux won't keep bolting bodges onto old APIs when they could just dump the whole thing and create something better. If no-one cares enough about supporting old hardware to fix the drivers, then it's clearly not important.

                                Did you claim that Windows was 'held together with duct tape and chewing gum' when many old XP drivers stopped working in Vista?

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