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The first German-Turkish "Döner" Food Restaurant in the US:

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  • #46
    OK, pics. This little abomination used a small, oddly shaped pita cut in half and filled with onions, peppers, home-made sauerkraut and thinly sliced "St. Louis pork steak" (slices of pork butt, but cooked more like ribs). Doesn't look a lot like the pic at the front of the thread, but then again I had no lettuce, tomato or doner. I'm guessing that the real thing uses a quarter of a much larger flatbread, is that right ? [/QUOTE]

    some döner buden use quarter and some use round flat bread

    oh i forgot the kraut in my receipt but its not a sauer(acid) kraut version on the döner there is fresh kraut not fermented...



    Originally posted by bridgman View Post
    The sauce in the pics is the same as I used earlier - bottled coleslaw dressing with sriracha on top - but I got tired of the sweetness and switched to a 50/50 mix of yogurt and sambal oelek (chili paste). Still probably not authentic but it has to be closer than coleslaw dressing and I like the taste better.
    The sauerkraut had caraway even if the bread didn't.
    EDIT - I bet professional photographers don't have to worry about sriracha stains on their backdrops.
    yayyy finaly a picture of your food the bread locks professional nice browning.

    but yes it does not look like a kebab the 2 colored dressings are really strange ...

    they use chlli flakes not chilli paste...

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post
      ...
      i found some pictures how to make döner meat:


      ...
      means its really 50 mieced and maybe 30-40 full meat and other stuff like spices.
      OK, I think I'm starting to understand this now. Traditional doner seems to have been made from hunks of meat pounded thin, trimmed into a rough circular shape, then marinated. The trimmings (including fatty bits) were ground up and layered between the relatively lean solid meat to provide a self-basting effect (in addition to the hunk of fat traditionally placed on top of the stack, augmented by a pineapple in Australia ).

      I'm thinking maybe an 80/20 or 90/10 ratio of solid to minced meat originally. The pics you linked seemed to be more 80/20 the other way, or worse.
      Last edited by bridgman; 08-28-2011, 12:18 PM.

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      • #48
        Its about time! I love Döner, and everytime I am in Berlin, I can't wait to goto Alexanderplatz or Sudkreuz and grab a Donner. Too bad Southern California has no Donner restaurants!

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        • #49
          Originally posted by bridgman View Post
          OK, I think I'm starting to understand this now. Traditional doner seems to have been made from hunks of meat pounded thin, trimmed into a rough circular shape, then marinated. The trimmings (including fatty bits) were ground up and layered between the relatively lean solid meat to provide a self-basting effect (in addition to the hunk of fat traditionally placed on top of the stack, augmented by a pineapple in Australia ).

          I'm thinking maybe an 80/20 or 90/10 ratio of solid to minced meat originally. The pics you linked seemed to be more 80/20 the other way, or worse.
          sure the picture shows a extreme version more than 60% minced meat is against the LAW in germany!...

          you can not call your product döner kebab if you use more than 60% minced...

          but maybe its 60& minced+Eggs, onions, oil, milk and yogurt 20% and only 20% real full meat

          means maybe they go close to the maximum of the LAW...

          " trimmed into a rough circular shape, then marinated."

          all meat is marinated before...

          only the modern minced version do have a inside marinate in the minced

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          • #50
            This thread keeps making me hungry. I've never considered making home made döner before. Now I have to give it a swirl sometime in the (not to distant) future.

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            • #51
              OK, doner kebab-ish v0.2. No pics this time though.

              I'm starting to get the pitas figured out. Too thick and they won't puff evenly, too thin and they won't puff at all. If the dough is too dry they won't puff, and if it's too wet the thickness gets messed up and they don't puff evenly. Ask me how I know.

              Fortunately there is a pretty big zone where the pitas do puff up OK - make them about as thick as a typical pizza crust, dough dry enough to handle but then spray one side with water while the oven & pan are preheating then spray the other side with water right after putting the dough on the heated pan.

              I didn't have time to roll my own kebab this time either, but found some lamb/beef sausages and grilled them then sliced diagonally to get long-ish slices. Used lettuce and tomato this time, which really helped, along with raw onion and a few sausage slices.

              Using commercially made sausages brings the "snouts & jowls" content, which I'm sure is an important component of any fast food product

              Best sauce so far was a mix of yogurt, ranch dressing and scotch bonnet sauce, maybe 4 parts yogurt to 3 parts ranch dressing and 2 parts hot sauce. It was important to have sauce all through, not just on top. I tried spreading a bit of sauce on the inside of the pita before assembling but that seemed to weaken the pita and make the result kinda messy, but alternating filling & sauce a couple of times worked well. When the sauce distribution was right these graduated from "OK" to "pretty darned good".
              Last edited by bridgman; 09-03-2011, 12:33 PM.

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              • #52
                And, in the spirit of "building bridges" between tech and bbq forums, yes you can make a pretty decent Doner Kebab lookalike with bacon. The Doner Kebaconbab tastes more authentic than I would have expected. Goes nicely with Amsterdam Orange Weisse beer (hey, it's the first warm-ish day we've had in a while).

                Then again, it's hard to find any combination of bacon and wheat beer that *doesn't* go together.
                Last edited by bridgman; 09-03-2011, 03:43 PM.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post
                  now you need salad on it and mice and tomatoes and onions and a yogurt source and chilly on it !
                  the "mice" here is a so called "bad friend" its sounds like "mais" but i mean Fresh-Corn here.

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                  • #54
                    OK, so if you are talking about http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maize rather than http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse then I don't mind following your recipe to the letter.
                    Last edited by bridgman; 09-03-2011, 04:12 PM.

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                    • #55
                      @bridgman

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ejpw6k32Gs

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by bridgman View Post
                        Using commercially made sausages brings the "snouts & jowls" content, which I'm sure is an important component of any fast food product
                        Best sauce so far was a mix of yogurt, ranch dressing and scotch bonnet sauce, maybe 4 parts yogurt to 3 parts ranch dressing and 2 parts hot sauce. It was important to have sauce all through, not just on top. I tried spreading a bit of sauce on the inside of the pita before assembling but that seemed to weaken the pita and make the result kinda messy, but alternating filling & sauce a couple of times worked well. When the sauce distribution was right these graduated from "OK" to "pretty darned good".
                        2 authentic professional receipts:

                        for the white one:
                        250g Ayran
                        200gTurkish or Greek Yoghurt
                        125g Crème fraiche
                        Salt and pepper
                        2 pieces of Garlic
                        Lemon juice
                        glutamate


                        and for the red one:
                        250 g Mayonnaise
                        250 g Quark
                        2 pieces of Garlic
                        ½ spoon paprika powder
                        1 spoon OIL
                        1 spon vinegar
                        ½ spoon Curry
                        ½ spoon Salz
                        glutamate

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                        • #57
                          Thanks !

                          The red one doesn`t seem like it would be very red - just maybe a bit pink-ish or orange-ish from the paprika and curry.

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by bridgman View Post
                            Thanks !

                            The red one doesn`t seem like it would be very red - just maybe a bit pink-ish or orange-ish from the paprika and curry.
                            red one does not mean full red color it means different version with red spices.
                            you can put more red spices in to color it up or you can cheat with "color" to paint it RED.
                            you also can ad a little bit of tomato but not fresh one get dried tomato powder..

                            but again.. its not tomato ketchup its a Döner dressing.

                            you can put ketchup on a hamburger but not on a döner.

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by bridgman View Post
                              OK, so if you are talking about http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maize rather than http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse then I don't mind following your recipe to the letter.
                              ok thank you this Dyslexia just reflection the chaos in my brain..
                              in my world (german native speaker) mice sound 100% like maize there is no difference..

                              because M is sound like MAAAA and CE is the same as ZE
                              I write what I hear thats my problem
                              but the German alphabetic sounds different..

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                              • #60
                                Good to know (about the sounds). I had to learn something similar when I was working in Korea. The core phoneme set there had one sound mid-way between our "R" and "L", and another sound mid-way between "B" and "P", so mixing up R/L and B/P when speaking English was very common since for a native speaker R and L are the same sound.

                                After a while your brain starts to automatically do an on-the-fly "if hearing that sound as R doesn't make sense then try it with L instead" translation and everything suddenly starts to make sense, like sticking a babelfish in your ear. Of course this is easier with short sentences where the tree of possible interpretations is relatively small.

                                Originally posted by 89c51;226160[url
                                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ejpw6k32Gs[/url]
                                Yeah, that's pretty much what I was trying to avoid
                                Last edited by bridgman; 09-03-2011, 05:53 PM.

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