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VP8 vs. h.264

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  • #21
    Yeah, that analysis was clearly biased. His word choice for one.
    He has invested a substantial portion of his life developing x264, so it's understandable to feel this way about a competing technology.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by Prescience500 View Post
      I completely agree that flash will remain for a long time. I suspect that new stuff will begin to use html5 by default in a couple years. Stuff that's currently using flash may continue to do so for many years. It's been many years, yet there are still "lots" of divx video out there on the internet. I believe flash will hang on in much the same way.
      I believe that new stuff will also use Flash. HTML5 lacks codecs. It has a video tag, but it doesn't say what codecs are supported. The only browser right now that plays all codecs is Chrome. The rest either supports only H.264 or only Theora.

      But with Flash, H.264 is guaranteed to be supported. regardless of what browser is used. Flash is a sure bet compared to HTML5. Also, H.264 is much better than Theora (better quality, lower bandwidth). I'd hate to see sites using Theora.

      Furthermore, it will take time for all users to switch to HTML5 browsers. I suspect that HTML5 will not be a real option for at least the next 6 years.

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      • #23
        I agree that it will take many years to transition to html5. The process of new stuff using html5 hasn't even begun and probably won't begin for at least a couple years or so. Theora? Theora's not even in the running anymore. It's no longer theora vs. h264, but VP8 vs. h264. VP8 is MUCH higher quality than theora.

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        • #24
          From a technical standpoint, VP8 is about even with H.264 baseline. Which is generally all that's used o the web anyway. It's not competing against the high quality versions of H.264, and if it did it would lose.

          Currently the encoder is way behind x264, but there's a lot of work going on now to fix that. Google is releasing quarterly updates, the first one already sped the decoder way up and had some minor image quality improvements in it. The next one is supposed to target encoder speed.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by RealNC View Post
            But with Flash, H.264 is guaranteed to be supported. regardless of what browser is used. Flash is a sure bet compared to HTML5.
            Flash will support VP8, so that's a non-issue.

            Also, H.264 is much better than Theora (better quality, lower bandwidth). I'd hate to see sites using Theora.
            Yeah, because H264 youtube is such high quality... Youtube could switch its 240, 360 and 480p videos (what *everyone* watches) to Theora and none would be the wiser.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
              Flash will support VP8, so that's a non-issue.
              I think you meant HTML5 will support VP8?

              Yeah, because H264 youtube is such high quality... Youtube could switch its 240, 360 and 480p videos (what *everyone* watches) to Theora and none would be the wiser.
              Actually, what people watch is 720p when it's available.

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              • #27
                You people know that H260 is used for stuff other that web videos, right.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                  I think you meant HTML5 will support VP8?
                  No, Flash will support VP8.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by Remco View Post
                    No, Flash will support VP8.
                    Then I fail to see the point. That just strengthens Flash, not HTML5 video.

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                    • #30
                      That's because you fail to see the point of HTML5 video. The codecs are a non-issue.

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