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Upset that my school is now a "success story" for migration to Windows

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  • #61
    Originally posted by mugginz View Post
    I must say that I don't mind someone saying they don't know Linux so therefore can't support it but I do have a problem with someone who doesn't know Linux rubbishing it not because it's really rubbish, but because they want to avoid it due to holes in their own knowledge base.
    :nod: :nod:

    A: "Hey, buddy! Long time no see. From Indonesia, right?"
    B: "Yeah, How do you know?"
    A" "Someone told me . Out of curiosity, what Durian taste like? You eat that things at least once right?"
    B: (ugh.. never tasted one, but..) "Hell yeah! it feel like salt, man! Don't you ever try it!"

    ...But, majority of Human being's like that. So??

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    • #62
      Originally posted by t.s. View Post
      A: "Hey, buddy! Long time no see. From Indonesia, right?"
      Nope, Australia :-)

      Indonesia's not that far away but my first international trip would likely be to England.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by RobbieAB View Post
        Really?

        Here is a quick thought experiment... You get mailed a word document by a colleague, you save it to your USB stick, you go off to give a professional presentation with the USB stick...

        Anyone see a potential "virus" problem in this?

        If you are moving from computer to computer, you need to worry about viruses. Your computers may not impacted directly, but it looks appallingly unprofessional to be serving as a transfer vector.
        But why Linux user should care about this?

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        • #64
          Originally posted by RealNC View Post
          This is extremely rare on Windows. On Linux for example, if you try to launch a binary you just downloaded and some lib is missing, you don't get an error message. On Windows it will say "morebloat.dll not found". Why not put this in a dialog on Linux too and say "libBloatware.so not found"?

          It makes so much sense to tell the user about such errors. I wonder why this was never implemented by anyone.
          Now, I've got the point. I thought you were talking about missing dependencies when installing some .deb. This is very good point and it will be great idea to make a blueprint.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by kraftman View Post
            Now, I've got the point. I thought you were talking about missing dependencies when installing some .deb. This is very good point and it will be great idea to make a blueprint.
            I too am amazed that you don't get any error messages when applications don't start correctly. Just push the icon and nothing happens. What the hell? From my perspective I don't really have an issue since i like the command line, but why not return the error messages? Should be simple. Or maybe returning errors is considered user unfriendly if you don't know how to interpret it?

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            • #66
              And another thing, when you find out that you are missing some libraries, even I as a moderately experienced user have some hard time finding the right package that contains the library.

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              • #67
                Originally posted by crispy View Post
                And another thing, when you find out that you are missing some libraries, even I as a moderately experienced user have some hard time finding the right package that contains the library.
                Then the right thing to do is to fill a blue print, isn't it?

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by kraftman View Post
                  But why Linux user should care about this?
                  If you are really asking why linux users should care about acting responsibly, this conversation is a waste of time.

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by RobbieAB View Post
                    If you are really asking why linux users should care about acting responsibly, this conversation is a waste of time.
                    No, I just don't care about windows problems and I don't understand why somebody mentioned Linux users should care about Windows viruses in Linux only environments I was talking about. Maybe he wanted to throw responsibility of Windows design being messed up on Linux' users shoulders? I will explain you something which I thought is obvious. If my boss wants me to send him some document and he's using Windows then I'll scan the file and then send it to him, but in schools where Linux will be the only OS I wouldn't even bother doing so. Linux is virus free right now and I'm talking about bugs like Windows viruses and not about trojans which are something different and mess your system when you execute them yourself unlike winvirs which can affect you system when you simply login to the network.

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by crispy View Post
                      I too am amazed that you don't get any error messages when applications don't start correctly. Just push the icon and nothing happens. What the hell?
                      Yeah, that sucks and is a user experience problem - not giving feedback. But I think this depends on the way the programs are coded. Sometimes the programers just don't implement this kind of feedback using GUI elements.

                      Originally posted by crispy View Post
                      Or maybe returning errors is considered user unfriendly if you don't know how to interpret it?
                      I'm used to hearing windows users complain when they are presented with nothing more than backtrace messages when a program fails. It's also not very helpful but at least the user knows there was an error. However, implementing good error detection and output messages is very time consuming and basically adds nothing useful to the program functionality if the errors never occur.

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by prophet5 View Post
                        An end user if they are restricted from admin usage really shouldn't care what OS they are using as long as they can use the programs they are required to use. My mother the technophobe uses Linux at home. She can send her e-mails, write her whatever it is she writes, download images from her camera. She's even found her Solitaire games. The only thing she can't seem to do is click the little X button to close programs down She knows KDE looks different to the WinXP at work, but she doesn't care.
                        Funny, my mom also had no problems using Fedora. As long as the desktop image is pretty she's happy. Maybe moms have some secret super power that enables them to understand linux without being a "linux-geek". Or maybe they just don't have a prejudice against it (unlike some other folks).
                        Originally posted by prophet5 View Post
                        As for the administrator, I would think it would be less expensive to hire someone who knew the current software being deployed than to replace it all to a different platform
                        Yeah right! If it was HIS money being spent that would probably be the case...

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