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VIA Publishes Three Programming Guides

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  • VIA Publishes Three Programming Guides

    Phoronix: VIA Publishes Three Programming Guides

    Earlier this week we shared that VIA had appointed an open-source liaison to work on providing the community with documentation and source-code for their products and work to improve VIA's image within the Linux and open-source communities. Since VIA announced their open-source strategy earlier this year, all they had provided was a simple kernel frame-buffer driver...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=NjYyMg

  • #2
    Way to go, VIA! Keep it up!

    Just remember what you're trying to sell and you'll be fine.

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    • #3
      Looks like a solid start. Hopefully before too long my system will be documented...

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      • #4
        Wonderful, thanks VIA!

        Hopefully the graphics documentation is in the pipeline, and that Harald Welte will be able to bring together the OpenChrome and Unichrome developers to work on a single codebase.

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        • #5
          "bring together the OpenChrome and Unichrome developers to work on a single codebase" that would be pure win.

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          • #6
            Why does VIA release the specs for their security engine?

            Isn't such only useful for Digital Restriction Management?

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            • #7
              And SSL or SSH based connections, I think. DRM is only one form (usage) of cryptography, and it is the least interesting from a systems point of view.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Louise View Post
                Why does VIA release the specs for their security engine?

                Isn't such only useful for Digital Restriction Management?
                As mentioned, ssh but even cryptography will benefit from that. Imagine hardware accelerated encryption of your hard drive. Thats cool.

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                • #9
                  I am thoroughly impressed and look forward to more good things from VIA.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by misiu_mp View Post
                    As mentioned, ssh but even cryptography will benefit from that. Imagine hardware accelerated encryption of your hard drive. Thats cool.
                    Sorry for using a bugmenot account, but I just wanted to add a few points:

                    Documentation for Padlock has been available since at least May 10 2006. See http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://...ming_guide.pdf
                    Linux and OpenSSL already has Padlock support. See http://www.logix.cz/michal/devel/padlock/
                    So while it is nice of via to make a commitment to release more documentation, in the case of Padlock it is nothing new.

                    The CX700 / VX800/820 documentation, on the other hand, is new.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by stan View Post
                      Hopefully the graphics documentation is in the pipeline, and that Harald Welte will be able to bring together the OpenChrome and Unichrome developers to work on a single codebase.
                      That was my take on this event. While the info in the chipset docs is going to be useful in the long-haul sense of the term- it's not fixing one of the mainline problems Linux users face with the use of their products. If you've got one of their IGP's, you're stuck with twitchy stuff at best- and no way for someone other than VIA right at the moment to properly fix it. Not a good thing, really. I divested myself of pretty much all my VIA devices because of issues with the display, etc.

                      I really do like the release of the useful PadLock info. That helps. Now, if only they could fix their display driver story...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Louise View Post
                        Why does VIA release the specs for their security engine?

                        Isn't such only useful for Digital Restriction Management?
                        No... It's hardware assisted cryptography. DRM uses crypto, but in a mostly bent manner. Think in terms of SSL, SSH, etc. taking up almost no CPU muscle- that's what that brings to the table.

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                        • #13
                          cool.

                          My Via system is just a file server, so it's already supported well enough for my needs. But the idea of an Isiah-based netbook is appealing, so I'm more than happy to see them dish out some documentation.

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                          • #14
                            Via Padlock's been supported in loop-aes too for a long time..

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