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X.Org DRI3 Present Extension Starts Taking Shape

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  • X.Org DRI3 Present Extension Starts Taking Shape

    Phoronix: X.Org DRI3 Present Extension Starts Taking Shape

    Keith Packard of Intel has managed to get an initial implementation of the DRI3 Present extension written and running for the X.Org Server...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQwOTA

  • #2
    Wikipedia says that DRI enabled hardware acceleration instead of relying on the CPU. so, before DRI Linux/Solaris/BSD didn't have hardware acceleration and used software rendering exclusively?
    Wonder when Windows got hardware acceleration?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by garegin View Post
      Wikipedia says that DRI enabled hardware acceleration instead of relying on the CPU. so, before DRI Linux/Solaris/BSD didn't have hardware acceleration and used software rendering exclusively?
      Wonder when Windows got hardware acceleration?
      Just because you can win a sprint doesn't mean you can win long distance races.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by garegin View Post
        Wikipedia says that DRI enabled hardware acceleration instead of relying on the CPU. so, before DRI Linux/Solaris/BSD didn't have hardware acceleration and used software rendering exclusively?
        Wonder when Windows got hardware acceleration?
        Before DRI, everything just went through X, and X doesn't have 3D drawing commands.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
          Before DRI, everything just went through X, and X doesn't have 3D drawing commands.
          Before DRI was DGA (Direct Graphics Acceleration) where the client was given a pointer to both the framebuffer and input stream (thus bypassing X entirely). What could possibly go wrong?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ickle View Post
            Before DRI was DGA (Direct Graphics Acceleration) where the client was given a pointer to both the framebuffer and input stream (thus bypassing X entirely). What could possibly go wrong?
            Why fix anything when you can just work around it? >.>

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            • #7
              Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
              Before DRI, everything just went through X, and X doesn't have 3D drawing commands.
              It sort-of did, in the sense that the GLX extension provided 3D drawing commands. The 3D commands were just rendered in software.

              The original DRI design document envisioned accelerating both direct- and indirect-rendered (via the X protocol) 3D commands, but IIRC all the early implementations focused on accelerating direct rendering because it offered the best performance.

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              • #8
                Before DRI was UTAH GLX:

                http://utah-glx.sourceforge.net/
                http://dri.freedesktop.org/wiki/UtahGLX/
                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utah_GLX

                Used it in 2002 to play TuxRacer in Xfree 3 (Utah GLX port to Xfree 4 was not/never completed) on ATI Rage Pro. Worked great.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by garegin View Post
                  Wikipedia says that DRI enabled hardware acceleration instead of relying on the CPU. so, before DRI Linux/Solaris/BSD didn't have hardware acceleration and used software rendering exclusively?
                  Wonder when Windows got hardware acceleration?
                  Before DRI was UTAH GLX:

                  http://utah-glx.sourceforge.net/
                  http://dri.freedesktop.org/wiki/UtahGLX/
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utah_GLX

                  This was on Xfree 3. Port to Xfree 4 was never fully completed.
                  I used it in 2002 to play tuxracer on ATI Rage Pro. Worked great.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by garegin View Post
                    Wikipedia says that DRI enabled hardware acceleration instead of relying on the CPU. so, before DRI Linux/Solaris/BSD didn't have hardware acceleration and used software rendering exclusively?
                    Wonder when Windows got hardware acceleration?
                    Seeing as the first versions of DRI date to the late 90's, I'm not seeing your point. Linux has been supporting that kind of stuff just as long as Windows, give or take a year or so - I remember it being a big deal back then, having proper 3d support for the Matrox card I had back then (state of the art, at the time). If you're thinking about hardware-accelerated desktops, Windows Vista introduced that in earlier 2007 - about a year after the first versions of Compiz became a hit in the Linux world

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Delgarde View Post
                      Seeing as the first versions of DRI date to the late 90's, I'm not seeing your point. Linux has been supporting that kind of stuff just as long as Windows, give or take a year or so - I remember it being a big deal back then, having proper 3d support for the Matrox card I had back then (state of the art, at the time).
                      There was also something called "Utah GLX", which I think predated DRI, but I don't really remember much of it besides the name. I do remember that getting hardware acceleration used to be a bit of work, because it relied on some "agpgart" module that wasn't yet part of the mainline Linux kernel. Even when DRI began to work out of the box, it was still a bumpy ride because of rendering glitches, software fallbacks and - at least with my Matrox card - semi-frequent lockups. (The lockups got rarer over time, but they never quite went away.)

                      These days I have an AMD card, and while that was also quite a bumpy road (partly because I got it while the open drivers were still beta quality), things are so much better now. I can't even remember if I've seen any lockups since the switch to Gallium3D, and for that I'm very grateful.

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