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VIA's Linux TODO List... Maybe Look Forward To 2011?

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  • VIA's Linux TODO List... Maybe Look Forward To 2011?

    Phoronix: VIA's Linux TODO List... Maybe Look Forward To 2011?

    Nearly two years ago at the Linux Foundation Summit in Austin was VIA's most recent announcement about becoming serious with open-source support. This was not VIA's first time they claimed to back an open-source strategy, which led a number of open-source developers to immediately call VIA's open-source strategy a bluff. To date this still is mostly a bluff, but they have produced some fluff. In 2010 it looks like this will still be the case, but VIA hopes to produce some code by the second half of 2010. This code, however, will likely not appear in most Linux distributions until 2011.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=14467

  • #2
    I don't think I've ever seen a single via graphics device.
    Whether they do or do not have open source drivers, does it actually affect anyone AT ALL?

    Comment


    • #3
      Open Source means more than just writing a driver. You have to update your driver for new kernel / x releases and so it's much work. Without a few developers this is not possible.

      Via, you have to hire a few developers or you can give up in the linux marked share. Your closed driver don't work either here. Nobody can take you serious any more and that's bad.

      If you are serious then hire luc and a few more devs and let them write in their blogs about what they are working on. Develop your drivers in the public, with a git repository on fd.org. It's clear that releasing documentation is an expensive business and that you don't want to spend much money on this. If it's relly impossible to release specs then only "your" developers can work on your drivers. But that's the only way sucessfull driver development on linux works.

      I really hope you do something, although I'm sure you don't will.

      Comment


      • #4
        People who currently have a VIA gfx card can get an infinitely better experience by spending $30,- on a new gfx card. VIA should just give up chasing dreams - they're not gonna get any serious market share the way they've been going.

        Comment


        • #5
          not so fast. via cards run very well under linux, even better than on windows, so i hear.

          however if via cannot capture the linux market share, its hard to see what kind of market they have. It doesn't matter how good the nano is, manufactures just wont build nano netbooks. at least not very many. I think via is just falling into the dust. They lack much real innovation recently. In the end these are all opinions - only time can truly tell.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by L33F3R View Post
            not so fast. via cards run very well under linux, even better than on windows, so i hear.
            That's really not much of an achievement. Last time I used a recent-ish VIA graphics chip in windows it couldn't even render basic OpenGL correctly, let alone at speed.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JeanPaul145 View Post
              People who currently have a VIA gfx card can get an infinitely better experience by spending $30,- on a new gfx card. VIA should just give up chasing dreams - they're not gonna get any serious market share the way they've been going.
              Except that if you have a netbook with a VIA core, you can't change your graphics card easily.

              You could just say "Buy intel netbooks" but I personally chose a VIA based netbook specifically because I didn't want to support the monopoly. Given the purpose most VIA cards tend to serve, super special graphics aren't a major issue anyway, it's usable with Mesa, or current openChrome, and anything else is a bonus.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by RobbieAB View Post
                Except that if you have a netbook with a VIA core, you can't change your graphics card easily.

                You could just say "Buy intel netbooks" but I personally chose a VIA based netbook specifically because I didn't want to support the monopoly. Given the purpose most VIA cards tend to serve, super special graphics aren't a major issue anyway, it's usable with Mesa, or current openChrome, and anything else is a bonus.
                Monopolies usually come into being because most people are convinced they are buying the best they can get for the money they're spending.
                It's also like that with Intel netbooks. To buy something else purely because you don't want to support the monopoly is idealistic but foolish.
                Buy something else because it is superior technically if you will, otherwise you'll be throwing your money away in my opinion.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by JeanPaul145 View Post
                  Monopolies usually come into being because most people are convinced they are buying the best they can get for the money they're spending.
                  It's also like that with Intel netbooks. To buy something else purely because you don't want to support the monopoly is idealistic but foolish.
                  Buy something else because it is superior technically if you will, otherwise you'll be throwing your money away in my opinion.
                  Let me see... What did I want the netbook to do...
                  1) Run Pidgin.
                  2) Run Firefox.
                  3) Play music.
                  4) Run skype.
                  5) Run a text-editor.

                  Any machine which can do the above is acceptable. After that, it's all about choice. Yeah, maybe I would have amazing 3D graphics on an Intel netbook, but I don't care much as it's not something I need. For me, the VIA netbook was "good enough" (actually, I have only seen one Intel netbook I would even consider against the one I have, and it fails on the speakers front).

                  Most people don't want "the best", they want "good enough". A VIA based system may well be "good enough" for many peoples needs. Afterall, look at how many people use Windows? It's clearly not "The Best™"...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RobbieAB View Post
                    Let me see... What did I want the netbook to do...
                    1) Run Pidgin.
                    2) Run Firefox.
                    3) Play music.
                    4) Run skype.
                    5) Run a text-editor.

                    Any machine which can do the above is acceptable. After that, it's all about choice. Yeah, maybe I would have amazing 3D graphics on an Intel netbook, but I don't care much as it's not something I need. For me, the VIA netbook was "good enough" (actually, I have only seen one Intel netbook I would even consider against the one I have, and it fails on the speakers front).

                    Most people don't want "the best", they want "good enough". A VIA based system may well be "good enough" for many peoples needs. Afterall, look at how many people use Windows? It's clearly not "The Best™"...
                    Note that "the best" doesn't necessarily translate to "the most expensive". I've seen netbooks that cost 300 euro's outperform netbooks that cost 450 euro's. Yes the latter ones are a ripoff but people who only want "good enough" might buy (and have bought and will guy) the more expensive one purely because they couldn't or didn't want to do their homework on the matter.

                    That said, I don't know how much a VIA netbook costs, mostly because the shops here in the Netherlands don't sell them. Care to indulge me in my asking for the price?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JeanPaul145 View Post
                      Note that "the best" doesn't necessarily translate to "the most expensive". I've seen netbooks that cost 300 euro's outperform netbooks that cost 450 euro's. Yes the latter ones are a ripoff but people who only want "good enough" might buy (and have bought and will guy) the more expensive one purely because they couldn't or didn't want to do their homework on the matter.
                      I never said the best was the most expensive, just that sometimes the difference between the "idealistic" choice and the "optimal" choice is in areas that are irrelevant. Calling those who choose the "idealist" choice foolish when they gain no benefit from the supposedly better choice is not really that helpful, especially when you consider the vast range of other factors (e.g. Case, speakers, battery...)

                      Originally posted by JeanPaul145 View Post
                      That said, I don't know how much a VIA netbook costs, mostly because the shops here in the Netherlands don't sell them. Care to indulge me in my asking for the price?
                      I think I paid ~€350 for my one a year ago, not the cheapest at the time, but it had a lovely case and what was at the time regarded as one of the best netbook keyboards. Also, the brushed metal case it really cute.

                      If I was buying now, I suspect I would still choose it because I like the speakers, keyboard, and case. The actual computer is pretty irrelevant for most purposes.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                        I don't think I've ever seen a single via graphics device.
                        Whether they do or do not have open source drivers, does it actually affect anyone AT ALL?
                        Yes, it does. My partner bought an HP netbook with XP on it. Wireless on it was so bad I set up a partition with Ubuntu. And sadly, that meant relying on reverse engineered openChrome drivers for the VIA graphics subsystem. And they suck. It's ok for internet and simple things but forget watching multimedia video.

                        In any case, it is too late. I will NEVER EVER buy or recommend a product containing VIA technology. It is safer to stick with Intel.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well. VIA is a sh*t.
                          Really. I own a few devices with VIA chips, let aside the NICs and audio chips. Just the CPU and GPU (miniITX boards, ECS G320 Laptop).
                          How long shall I still wait? Man, until 2011 (okay Gentoo will offer the recent kernels earlier than other distribution but anyway) I have to wait until I get that stuff finally going? No way. I wonder if the hardware will still be working at this point.
                          I really like the idea of the C7 eden (low power uptake) and padlock crypto accel chips and all that stuff. But what is all that good for if the drivers are crap?
                          I don't expect to play DooM3 or something on these boxes but at least something that works basically and doesn't crash with every thing that goes above VESA modesetting capabilities.

                          I will not buy any VIA stuff again. It just sucks. And as far as I heard before (miniITX messageboards and such) it also sucks in Windows.
                          Yes, I have basic modesetting here and MPEG2 / some 2d acceleration but e.g. EXA will not work. Only XAA. Forget OpenGL, OpenVG, OpenCL (lol, with these chips), and KMS or other fancy stuff. I couldn't even get a graphical console running along with having X.
                          Until VIA shows some real engagement in Linux I will not buy their stuff anymore.
                          And stick to something that works.
                          Intel has a few things in the same energy uptake area to offer by now (but make sure not to get a poulsbo crap) and AMD is also going in the right direction (they just lack something like an atom CPU, the Geode doesn't count). If you want x86.

                          I still hope that I will someday see the hardware working that I paid for.


                          And: Since when is Harald Welte not with VIA anymore? His blog didn't say so and I also found not info that would say they parted. AFAIK he was working on something OLPC related.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thank you all of your comment and education.
                            These 2 years, we were educated to be "release early", "release often". And moreover, we are educated to open the source at the developing stage. So sharing the source code at the very beginning stage is the main purpose for hosting project in public domain.
                            I agree the schedule is slow. We are still trying to speed it up.

                            Thank you very much again for all your information and education.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Bruce.. what is the actual situation? Can I expect my lenovos12 to run 3d games? when will that be possible?
                              Also, when can I expect to buy a 12 inches netbook with via nano 3000 and vn1000?
                              thanks

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