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DRM Changes For Linux 2.6.32 Kernel

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  • #11
    Originally posted by Fixxer_Linux View Post
    Does this 3D support for R600/R700 means that I'll be able to play UT2K4 or Heroes of Newerth with my ATI HD4870 with this open-source driver, getting ride of fglrx ?
    Thats the idea
    Though it is something of a work-in-progress, some bugs remain yet, so soon...

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    • #12
      Originally posted by whizse View Post
      DRM as in Direct Rendering Manager, not DRM as in Digital Restrictions Management,
      Even though I aren't pro-DRM, I think it still makes sense to use Rights instead of just twisting it into what you think it means. There is no such word as Restriction in the term.

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      • #13
        r6xx/r7xx 3d support works with both kms and non-kms.

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        • #14
          Yes, 3D is a bit glitchy, and definitely not performance oriented at the moment, but the basics work on my HD4850. With KMS.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Fixxer_Linux View Post
            Does this 3D support for R600/R700 means that I'll be able to play UT2K4 or Heroes of Newerth with my ATI HD4870 with this open-source driver, getting ride of fglrx ?
            At least not HoN, there's still problems with Mesa for this particular game.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by lbcoder View Post
              Catalyst will NEVER be compatible with it. You are going to have to entirely disable it in order for catalyst to work. That means ensuring that the applicable modules aren't loaded at bootup. No matter anyhow since catalyst is almost obsolete now, just a few more bug fixes for the open source driver and you'll never need catalyst again.
              I meant that if it is going to be compatible with the kernel, I already knew that I would have to disable KMS. I guess it all depends on what Ubuntu does for 10.04.

              Anyway, I see your point, but I think it'll take a few more months (maybe a year?) for the open source driver to match Catalyst feature set.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by Fixxer_Linux View Post
                Does this 3D support for R600/R700 means that I'll be able to play UT2K4 or Heroes of Newerth with my ATI HD4870 with this open-source driver, getting ride of fglrx ?
                Yes! that will be the future! but!:::BUT!!! you need to wait a half year becouse the opensource driver do still not have mainfeatures like OpenGL2.1 or OpenGL3.2

                in the future the opensource driver will be full-featured!

                soooo only wait and see how fast the opensource driver grow!

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by lbcoder View Post
                  Catalyst will NEVER be compatible with it. You are going to have to entirely disable it in order for catalyst to work. That means ensuring that the applicable modules aren't loaded at bootup. No matter anyhow since catalyst is almost obsolete now, just a few more bug fixes for the open source driver and you'll never need catalyst again.
                  bugfixes??? LOL... the opensource driver do not have OpenGL2.1 or OpenGL3.2...

                  YES FIX THAT BUG!

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
                    Even though I aren't pro-DRM, I think it still makes sense to use Rights instead of just twisting it into what you think it means. There is no such word as Restriction in the term.
                    That's just what it is. DRM is used to manage restrictions to content. It is never used to give you more than the 100% control you would have had without DRM.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Remco View Post
                      That's just what it is. DRM is used to manage restrictions to content. It is never used to give you more than the 100% control you would have had without DRM.
                      Actually it is used to enforce that people who own full rights to digital content can get their demands on how you should be allowed to use their digital content after purchasing a copy respected. Yes, it's about restrictions, yes, it's not fully legal in all countries but it is about protecting copyrights for digital content, therefore Digital Rights Management is justified. (actually DRP - Digital Rights Protection - would be more precise, DRM has little to do with management)

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