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  • #46
    Originally posted by highlandsun View Post
    Karmic boots even faster than Jaunty. It's amazing what a difference there is between the 2.6.29 and 2.6.30-31 kernels...
    Music to my ears! Gigabyte has also fixed their slow boot issues (kudos for releasing a bios update 3 years after the motherboard was released!) - at this rate, I might even forgive AMD for their broken suspend w/ compiz.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
      VirtualBox is always the latest version here. Boot speed is atrocious in openSUSE, worse even than Fedora. Ubuntu and Arch mop the floor with openSUSE when booting: think 20 seconds vs 1 minute and 20 seconds.
      What?

      openSUSE boots MUCH faster than fedora and ubuntu for me.
      suse is like 20-25 seconds, fedora is like 40, ubuntu is 30-ish

      Are you booting from disk (or disk image) or livecd/iso?

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      • #48
        Your boot times sound puzzlingly long, maybe I should time my own at some point. I recall I easily went under 20 seconds with a Gentoo years ago and my Fedora seems to boot fast enough.

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        • #49
          @some-guy

          Do you use a stop watch or bootchart?

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          • #50
            Originally posted by some-guy View Post
            What?

            openSUSE boots MUCH faster than fedora and ubuntu for me.
            suse is like 20-25 seconds, fedora is like 40, ubuntu is 30-ish

            Are you booting from disk (or disk image) or livecd/iso?
            I am booting all those distros from normal installations inside VirtualBox (same hard disk).

            While I haven't tested openSUSE on a normal installation, I *have* tested Ubuntu, Arch and Fedora. In my experience, Fedora 4, 8 and 11 are the slowest (with Fedora 4 being the worst offender) and your results seem to agree. Arch is the fastest after a few simple tweaks (~16-17'' bootchart), while Ubuntu 9.04 is the fastest out of the box (18'') (edit: which is about 50% faster than Ubuntu 8.10 - impressive!)

            Now, it *could* be that openSUSE is interacting badly with VirtualBox for some reason, but I've yet to see a single openSUSE version that boots fast in VBox. However, given that other distros do not have any problems with VBox (a few seconds difference at most, usually < 5''), I don't really think this is an issue with the VM.

            I was about to go gather some VBox statistics for each distro (bytes read/written during boot, CPU time used), but my openSUSE 11 VM managed to kill itself after the latest upgrade: need to reinstall the VBox guest additions (no dkms?!), the cdrom is not in fstab anymore (huh?) and I really don't want to spend my time fixing a broken distro right now.
            Last edited by BlackStar; 08-12-2009, 01:20 PM.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Kano View Post
              @some-guy

              Do you use a stop watch or bootchart?
              I have only measured suse with bootchart, which boots in 27 seconds, my setup is different from standard (no splash, 2.6.30 kernel, certain services disabled).

              Ubuntu seems like it boots faster than suse, and suse is faster than fedora.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by some-guy View Post
                I have only measured suse with bootchart, which boots in 27 seconds, my setup is different from standard (no splash, 2.6.30 kernel, certain services disabled).

                Ubuntu seems like it boots faster than suse, and suse is faster than fedora.

                You can also further improve performance by tweaking the mount options such as noatime and nodiratime.

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                • #53
                  Ok I have some VirtualBox stats to share. Bytes read until the desktop becomes usable (all icons appear, disk stops grinding and you can launch applications), sorted from least to most:

                  Arch amd64: 102MB
                  Ubuntu 9.04 amd64: 145MB
                  Fedora 11: 220MB
                  openSUSE 11.0 amd64: 280MB
                  Windows 7RC1 amd64: 305MB (but continues to climb due to prefetch)

                  Fedora and openSUSE are vanilla Gnome desktops with all updates applied. Arch and Ubuntu are also vanilla Gnomes, with Gnome Do set to autolaunch (which initializes the Mono runtime, hence more bytes read).

                  What does this tell us? There is a direct correspondence between boot speed and bytes read. Arch initiliazes the least services and reads the least bytes during boot - it is also the fastest. Ubuntu is a close second with the rest trailing far behind.

                  If you have a few GBs to spare, you can reproduce the results with VirtualBox 3.0.4. Use File->Session Information Dialog to read the results.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
                    Ok I have some VirtualBox stats to share. Bytes read until the desktop becomes usable (all icons appear, disk stops grinding and you can launch applications), sorted from least to most:

                    Arch amd64: 102MB
                    Ubuntu 9.04 amd64: 145MB
                    Fedora 11: 220MB
                    openSUSE 11.0 amd64: 280MB
                    Windows 7RC1 amd64: 305MB (but continues to climb due to prefetch)

                    Fedora and openSUSE are vanilla Gnome desktops with all updates applied. Arch and Ubuntu are also vanilla Gnomes, with Gnome Do set to autolaunch (which initializes the Mono runtime, hence more bytes read).

                    What does this tell us? There is a direct correspondence between boot speed and bytes read. Arch initiliazes the least services and reads the least bytes during boot - it is also the fastest. Ubuntu is a close second with the rest trailing far behind.

                    If you have a few GBs to spare, you can reproduce the results with VirtualBox 3.0.4. Use File->Session Information Dialog to read the results.
                    Very nice, thanks for sharing those results.

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                    • #55
                      @some-guy

                      For bootchart thats slow, but i prefer booting real hardware:

                      http://kanotix.com/files/fix/bootchart/

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
                        Ok I have some VirtualBox stats to share. Bytes read until the desktop becomes usable (all icons appear, disk stops grinding and you can launch applications), sorted from least to most:

                        Arch amd64: 102MB
                        Ubuntu 9.04 amd64: 145MB
                        Fedora 11: 220MB
                        openSUSE 11.0 amd64: 280MB
                        Windows 7RC1 amd64: 305MB (but continues to climb due to prefetch)

                        Fedora and openSUSE are vanilla Gnome desktops with all updates applied. Arch and Ubuntu are also vanilla Gnomes, with Gnome Do set to autolaunch (which initializes the Mono runtime, hence more bytes read).

                        What does this tell us? There is a direct correspondence between boot speed and bytes read. Arch initiliazes the least services and reads the least bytes during boot - it is also the fastest. Ubuntu is a close second with the rest trailing far behind.

                        If you have a few GBs to spare, you can reproduce the results with VirtualBox 3.0.4. Use File->Session Information Dialog to read the results.
                        Tells me that you can easily improve your performance with openSUSE by looking at your YaST-->System--->System Services.

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