Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

2008 Linux Graphics Survey Results

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    What bothered me slightly was the lack of an option to vote for XRandR. As a laptop user, it is more interesting to me than pretty much anything else bar stability, as projectors and external monitors are an important part of using a mobile laptop in any kind of business environment.

    Comment


    • #17
      But... KMS needs DRI2, so, the pool was wrong. It should have been DRI2 or KMS (and DRI2) and the other options also.

      Comment


      • #18
        In my mind, xrandr was in "Display-related features". Considering it's mostly waiting for all proprietary drivers to pick up, it's more in "What do you expect in proprietary drivers" than "What are you most interested in Xorg".

        Whatever xrandr does, as long as the drivers don't support it there's not much point. And seeing how users don't really use the graphic card tool to configure their setup, you'd say it would make sense for the drivers publisher to implement xrandr support a bit faster.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by fart_flower View Post
          That's just your theory. I have my own.

          That's not my theory at all. It's fact that despite best intentions and planning thing don't always go as well as expected. Until actual implementation is actually out there and performing as well as expected it's pure speculation.
          Last edited by deanjo; 12-22-2008, 11:20 PM.

          Comment


          • #20
            What are you looking for in it? If the system can automagically deal with having a projector plugged in (this requires a reasonable amount of magic) it makes selling Linux as a laptop OS to business people who expect to make presentations a lot easier. If the projector has to be configured by tweaking xorg.conf, and restarting, you do not have a business laptop OS.

            That magic is XRandR, it may need driver help, but to say it is just a matter for the proprietry drivers to catch up is nonsense as, IIRC, openChrome is an open source driver.

            To push Linux on laptops, you needs automagic and effortless multi-monitor support, you need hot-plugable displays, and you need all this to be completely invisible to the user. Windows has done it for years, as has MacOS. Linux has "innovated" with eye-candy instead...

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by KDesk View Post
              But... KMS needs DRI2, so, the pool was wrong. It should have been DRI2 or KMS (and DRI2) and the other options also.
              My understanding was that KMS needed memory management (GEM/TTM), DRI2 also needed memory management but KMS did not need DRI2. They will probably arrive at more or less the same time, however, since they both become possible as soon as memory management is available, and both are considered really high priority by the developers.

              EDIT - bah, ASCII diagram didn't work ;(
              Last edited by bridgman; 12-23-2008, 12:07 AM.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by bridgman View Post
                My understanding was that KMS needed memory management (GEM/TTM), DRI2 also needed memory management but KMS did not need DRI2. They will probably arrive at more or less the same time, however, since they both become possible as soon as memory management is available, and both are considered really high priority by the developers.

                EDIT - bah, ASCII diagram didn't work ;(
                Oh, yes, you are complete right! The share the memory manager in common... and not DRI2.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Eragon View Post
                  How can people keep saying linux is not suited for "normal" users if 56% of it's users describe themselves as "mainstream users"??
                  Of the four choices available in the survey, IMHO the closest choice to normal was mainstream. The survey is still available in review fashion which helps see how questions and answers can sometimes skew perception of answers. I was looking to see how the survey handled the question of hardware because I have own or use via work a combination of linux booting computers (ex: macbook pro with nvida, two dell laptops with ati, eeepc, amd tower with nvida). The multiple choice answer to that question came close to capturing my collection but is still skewed (IMHO) because it doesn't show the count per manufacturer.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by RobbieAB View Post
                    Windows has done it for years, as has MacOS. Linux has "innovated" with eye-candy instead...
                    That is the very sad truth!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by deanjo View Post
                      That's not my theory at all.
                      If that's the case, do you have an appropriate 3rd party licence?



                      It's fact that despite best intentions and planning thing don't always go as well as expected. Until actual implementation is actually out there and performing as well as expected it's pure speculation.
                      Geez... I was just being silly. No need to drive home an obvious point. I hope you didn't burst a vein coming up with your response.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I highly doubt that somebody really needs kms. At least it does not matter for me if switching to a vt takes a few monents or if the default res is already the highest possible. Stability is much more important - also correct rendering and flickerfree videos/games when Vsync is enabled. The rest it nice to have, but not a requirement.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Kano View Post
                          I highly doubt that somebody really needs kms.
                          And you're wrong. KMS is extremely important for suspend and hibernation, which is critical for laptop users. It's a huge boon for display hotplug. It's mandatory for developing alternative graphics stacks without duplicating a metric shitload of driver code.

                          KMS is way more interesting to me than DRI2 is. GEM interests me most of all, of course. Without it, neither DRI2 nor KMS could really work.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Ok, I do not own a laptop, so I never use suspend. Hibernation/Suspend to Disk is useless anyway because you would read in worst case more data than you would do with a normal boot when you memory is big and used.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I guess the argument for suspend/resume is that it maintains your application state as well ?

                              The other advantage to KMS I see is that it puts all of the state info you need for good power management in one place. Right now the engine state is in drm (unless you're running without 3d) and the display state is in ddx, but you really need both to make on-the-fly power management decisions.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Kano View Post
                                Ok, I do not own a laptop, so I never use suspend. Hibernation/Suspend to Disk is useless anyway because you would read in worst case more data than you would do with a normal boot when you memory is big and used.
                                This is true for hibernation/suspend to disk. But what about suspend to RAM? Most of laptop users use it a lot. And it still is at least 2 times slower than on windows (especially while using fglrx - open source driver suspends and resumes the graphics quicker, but still slower than windows!).

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X