Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Wayland's Weston Received New Features Yesterday

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by sarmad View Post
    Gnome Shell, which will soon become a Wayland compositor, supports a similar feature through an extension, although using the mouse not the keyboard. Just drag a window over another window while holding Ctrl and the windows will be tiled for you. Way more powerful and usable than your suggestion in my opinion.
    I don't find GNOME Shell usable though.
    I find it confusing, and its like its designed for these touch people.
    To me it just feels backwards and weird.

    I want gnome-session-flashback.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by uid313 View Post
      I don't find GNOME Shell usable though.
      I find it confusing, and its like its designed for these touch people.
      To me it just feels backwards and weird.

      I want gnome-session-flashback.
      No it's not designed for touch. It's designed for desktop computing, i.e. mouse and keyboard, and it's in fact hard to use (if at all usable) with a touch screen. It's designed to be a highly productive environment if you manage to teach yourself out of the mindset of having a traditional task bar and programs menu. It's also designed for maximum use of screen space which is perfect for laptops.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by sarmad View Post
        No it's not designed for touch. It's designed for desktop computing, i.e. mouse and keyboard, and it's in fact hard to use (if at all usable) with a touch screen. It's designed to be a highly productive environment if you manage to teach yourself out of the mindset of having a traditional task bar and programs menu. It's also designed for maximum use of screen space which is perfect for laptops.
        *Especially* for keyboard. It's kind of clumsy for mouse use (too much long-distance movement, reliance on the screen edges and corners), but it works *very* well for someone who tends to use the keyboard for most stuff...

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by sarmad View Post
          No it's not designed for touch. It's designed for desktop computing, i.e. mouse and keyboard, and it's in fact hard to use (if at all usable) with a touch screen. It's designed to be a highly productive environment if you manage to teach yourself out of the mindset of having a traditional task bar and programs menu. It's also designed for maximum use of screen space which is perfect for laptops.
          Well, it's probably good for people who only use their web browser and such.
          Moms and dads and such.

          Probably not so good for advanced users.
          I find it mostly just gets in the way...

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Delgarde View Post
            *Especially* for keyboard. It's kind of clumsy for mouse use (too much long-distance movement, reliance on the screen edges and corners),.
            In case of mouse use, its pointer speed is the factor.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Delgarde View Post
              *Especially* for keyboard. It's kind of clumsy for mouse use (too much long-distance movement, reliance on the screen edges and corners), but it works *very* well for someone who tends to use the keyboard for most stuff...
              That's true. I usually have a hand close to the Super key so I don't need long distance movements. I guess this becomes more apparent if you use dual monitors. Maybe they should map a mouse button to the Super key or to Alt+Tab, or maybe someone can write an extension to do that.

              Comment

              Working...
              X