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Wayland Demonstration At XDS 2010

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  • Wayland Demonstration At XDS 2010

    Phoronix: Wayland Demonstration At XDS 2010

    While the Wayland Display Server is not being discussed officially in any of the talks at the X.Org Developers' Summit in Toulouse, it has been mentioned a few times during other talks and can commonly be heard in discussions between Intel and Nokia developers outside of the event. At the pre-event I also discussed Wayland for a short time with Kristian Høgsberg, the project's founder, where it was learned Intel may deploy Wayland in MeeGo Touch, among other facts. Wayland was also brought up by Kristian during his talk on libxkbcommon, which is a common XKB library for keyboard input that can also be utilized by Wayland...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODYxNA

  • #2
    What, no video?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by unimatrix View Post
      What, no video?
      Can't wait for the uploads ^^,

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      • #4
        Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
        Can't wait for the uploads ^^,
        Unfortunately the audio feed seems to be dead for most of the time. I do have other recordings from my laptop for some talks for those that may want to filter out my typing noise.
        Michael Larabel
        http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Michael View Post
          Unfortunately the audio feed seems to be dead for most of the time. I do have other recordings from my laptop for some talks for those that may want to filter out my typing noise.
          No audio is still better than no video. A lot of us probably just wanna see Wayland in action.

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          • #6
            Can someone explain what exactly Wayland is? I read that is started in 2007 by Red Hat engineer, as replacement for X. Now it seems like it is some additional protocol to go with X. I suppose that is better idea than replacing X altogether, there are lot of thing that depend on X...

            Is there any in-depth explanation of Wayland. how it works and how it interacts with X?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by gnufreex View Post
              Can someone explain what exactly Wayland is? I read that is started in 2007 by Red Hat engineer, as replacement for X. Now it seems like it is some additional protocol to go with X. I suppose that is better idea than replacing X altogether, there are lot of thing that depend on X...

              Is there any in-depth explanation of Wayland. how it works and how it interacts with X?
              It can replace X, but it can also run X applications using a rootles X server and composite them together with the native Wayland apps. A bit like Mac OS X's window system - it doesn't need X but can provide the backward compatibility.

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              • #8
                slim

                Wayland would be the bare minimal network protocol for a modern GPU stack?
                I really have to look further into it.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by sylware View Post
                  Wayland would be the bare minimal network protocol for a modern GPU stack?
                  I really have to look further into it.
                  Wayland is X, stripped of all the old stuff, geared at the future, acting more or less as R&D in practise. It's not network oriented. To achieve network computing and 'legacy' compatibility it can use Xserver. It's much more abstract. Porting GTK/Qt has been discussed and porting GTK is in the works (or so I believe; news is scarce).

                  It started as a hobby project by a Red Hat employe. It's not realy that much of a hobby project anymore in the sense that Intel and Nokia are planning to use Wayland for Meamo; it's great for embedded systems.

                  There is the possibility that, over time, X.org will grow, but not fully, towards Wayland, due to Waylands 'new tech', where proven.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
                    Wayland is X, stripped of all the old stuff, geared at the future, acting more or less as R&D in practise. It's not network oriented. To achieve network computing and 'legacy' compatibility it can use Xserver. It's much more abstract. Porting GTK/Qt has been discussed and porting GTK is in the works (or so I believe; news is scarce).

                    It started as a hobby project by a Red Hat employe. It's not realy that much of a hobby project anymore in the sense that Intel and Nokia are planning to use Wayland for Meamo; it's great for embedded systems.

                    There is the possibility that, over time, X.org will grow, but not fully, towards Wayland, due to Waylands 'new tech', where proven.
                    What are the differences between wayland and GTK/Clutter ported to use directly libdrm/gallium3d/libxkb?
                    If they want to use it for meego, it shall be C++/Qt (erk!), wouldn't it?
                    (I'm sad to see the C dependency swapped for a C++ dependency in meego)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sylware View Post
                      What are the differences between wayland and GTK/Clutter ported to use directly libdrm/gallium3d/libxkb?
                      Well... Clutter is a graphic library on top of which the Mutter WM is made.
                      GTK is a widget toolkit that uses Xlib, which Wayland doesn't have, so that's why it must be ported to Wayland.
                      Wayland is a tiny display server. It's using EGL? If so (don't realy remember with all that info flying around) then GTK+ will probably render to a texture/pixmap which Wayland will use (compositing) for drawing windows.

                      If they want to use it for meego, it shall be C++/Qt (erk!), wouldn't it?
                      Ah, yes; MeeGo, my fault I think the 'Gnome/GTK+'-'camp' will use C, but since Nokia has Qt, Nokia will probably use C++, but Wayland is pretty low level with KMS and the State Trackers and such so the implementation might just be C. I don't know that much about Wayland yet

                      (I'm sad to see the C dependency swapped for a C++ dependency in meego)
                      Politics

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
                        Ah, yes; MeeGo, my fault I think the 'Gnome/GTK+'-'camp' will use C, but since Nokia has Qt, Nokia will probably use C++, but Wayland is pretty low level with KMS and the State Trackers and such so the implementation might just be C. I don't know that much about Wayland yet
                        I wouldn't rely on that kind of assumptions. Mesa has C++ code too. Better just go check what Wayland consists of.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
                          I wouldn't rely on that kind of assumptions. Mesa has C++ code too. Better just go check what Wayland consists of.
                          And neither do I. I just treid to answer his questions to the best of my extremely limited knowledge. So If I came over as "It will be like this" then what I mean is "I dunno, maybe it's like that?"

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                          • #14
                            GTK+ stack

                            Well... I meant what will be the differences between GTK+ stack on top of wayland and the GTK+ stack on top of libdrm/gallium3D/libxkb?

                            (Since I love C++, I allowed myself to phase it out from the thread)

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                            • #15
                              Supporting Qt doesn't mean that Wayland is necessarily c++. The changes required are done inside the Qt code, so that instead of drawing onto an pixmap or opengl texture, it instead draws on whatever Wayland uses. Wayland itself doesn't need to be touched at all.

                              Of course, I'm not sure what Wayland is written in, it may have already been c++ from the start or it could still be plain C.

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