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KDE's Painting/Image Program Now Uses OpenGL 3.0

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  • KDE's Painting/Image Program Now Uses OpenGL 3.0

    Phoronix: KDE's Painting/Image Program Now Uses OpenGL 3.0

    Krita is KDE's painting and image editing program that soon will see its v2.8 release. With this next Krita release there is new usage of OpenGL 3.x within the open-source program. Under the high quality filtering mode, OpenGL 3.0 is now used for delivering a superior painting/imaging experience...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTUzMDI

  • #2
    Make a wish...

    I really wish that GIMP would have the same pace of development as Krita...

    Comment


    • #3
      Typo:

      "Krit 2.8 also has benefits"

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Redi44 View Post
        I really wish that GIMP would have the same pace of development as Krita...
        I agree.

        Why is it that a painting application is developed with such a fast pace whereas an image manipulation program, which probably has a much larger user base, can not find enough developers.

        Is it the programming language / toolkit? The project management?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Redi44 View Post
          I really wish that GIMP would have the same pace of development as Krita...
          This and Pinta. Paint.net is a really nice image editor for the people with less-than-professional needs (I.E. most computer users). I really hope Pinta can sort of catch up at some point.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bathroom Humor View Post
            This and Pinta. Paint.net is a really nice image editor for the people with less-than-professional needs (I.E. most computer users). I really hope Pinta can sort of catch up at some point.
            Try Kolourpaint; it's the best MS-Paint-alike I've found. Being Qt/KDE really makes it nicer, too.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by woegjiub View Post
              Try Kolourpaint; it's the best MS-Paint-alike I've found. Being Qt/KDE really makes it nicer, too.
              I used to use that, actually. But it's basically like this
              Kolourpaint:Pinta::MsPaint:Paint.net
              I like the simplicity, but I also like having some extra goodies at my disposal. That's where Paint.net excels, that and the various add-ons that can be installed for it. Pinta has that sort of potential but needs more contributers.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Temar View Post
                I agree.

                Why is it that a painting application is developed with such a fast pace whereas an image manipulation program, which probably has a much larger user base, can not find enough developers.

                Is it the programming language / toolkit? The project management?
                There is a helluva lot more work going into GIMP and GEGL than Krita. Compare Krita to MyPaint.

                Gimp stable is now at 2.8.10 and when Gimp 2.10 is released the real ``advances'' people seem to think fly off the shelf with Krita will be clear having a mature and solid GEGL.

                Gimp 3.0 is the complete port to GNOME 3.x.

                Lots of power in GEGL which requires a lot of time to get right:

                http://wiki.gimp.org/index.php/Hacki...ilters_to_GEGL

                Tons of work with OpenCL.

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                • #9
                  _I_ really wish...

                  Originally posted by Redi44 View Post
                  I really wish that GIMP would have the same pace of development as Krita...
                  I really wish that people would stop making this kind of comparison... GIMP is one thing, Krita is another. I think the GIMP team is doing a great job implementing their vision, and I think we're doing a great job driving Krita forward. There's the Krita Foundation that manages the Krita Development Fund, which pays a full-time developer at the moment, there's the input from KO GmbH which drives the professional uptake of Krita as well as the Sketch and Gemini projects, we've got a wonderful community of artists who use Krita and give us feedback.

                  It's our choice to have at least two full releases a year, and that naturally shows off our continued progress. With a stable release every four years, what's being done is invisible during that period. But that's a valid development strategy as well -- a project should choose what fits its culture best.

                  On the other hand, if you insist on comparing projects, it's a bit silly to claim that Krita's development speed isn't even close to GIMP's. As Ohloh shows, we're in the same ballpark figures of contributors: 73 in the past 12 months for Krita versus 66 for GIMP. It's probably a difference in development model, but we're at about 2500 commits a year, GIMP at 1000. Sure, Krita is part of the Calligra source code repository, but compared to the work done on Krita and for Krita in the shared libraries, the other parts of Calligra barely make a blip. Mypaint has 72 contributors and has about 500 commits in the last year. Pinta 38 all-time developers and 118 commits.

                  Sure, statistics lie. But then, well, Marc isn't factually correct either when he says "There is a helluva lot more work going into GIMP and GEGL than Krita. Compare Krita to MyPaint."

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Marc Driftmeyer View Post
                    Lots of power in GEGL which requires a lot of time to get right:

                    http://wiki.gimp.org/index.php/Hacki...ilters_to_GEGL
                    Holy shit, if that's the todo list for 2.10, the next GIMP release seems like years away.

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