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Direct3D 9 Support Released For Linux Via Gallium3D, Running Games

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  • #16
    Originally posted by shmerl View Post
    So this is limited to Nouveau / open Radeon only?
    In principle it can work with all gallium drivers. So all those listed here:
    http://cgit.freedesktop.org/mesa/mes...llium/drivers/
    Originally posted by blackout23 View Post
    After using Linux for about 4-5 year now I still don't fully understand how graphics stack actually work and what's up with Gallium, Mesa, KMS, DRI und DDX drivers etc.
    Then I suggest that you start reading
    http://yangman.ca/blog/2009/10/linux...ack-explained/ (very simple explanation, slightly outdated)
    http://blog.mecheye.net/2012/06/the-...raphics-stack/ (a bit more detailed)

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Cyber Killer View Post
      Me too. There are too many vista-only games coming out nowadays.
      d3d9 is still on its deathbed, like it or not. winxp support ends by april 2014, xboxone gets released by year end (with dx11.2 being exclusive to it... and win8.1 but let's concentrate on stuff that at the very least has a chance of making a moderate splash).

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      • #18
        Civilization V

        I'd say this patchset is worth it solely for use with Civilization V; I have a feeling that it is the type of game most popular amongst the GNU-using demographic, even though most of our native games are doom/unreal clones . I may just play it again and buy the gold version upgrade (only $20 for the first expansion and all DLC!) if it works out. Though supposedly using all the DLC causes Wine to crash, so it might actually be a waste of money.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by PsynoKhi0 View Post
          d3d9 is still on its deathbed, like it or not. winxp support ends by april 2014, xboxone gets released by year end (with dx11.2 being exclusive to it... and win8.1 but let's concentrate on stuff that at the very least has a chance of making a moderate splash).
          It doesn't matter if it's on it's death-bed. They're lots of D3D9 Games that people could play, remember even win98 has DX9 support. That's a lot of Games for people to play, fun games, unlike most redundant cash-grab garbage today.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by chithanh View Post
            In principle it can work with all gallium drivers. So all those listed here:
            http://cgit.freedesktop.org/mesa/mes...llium/drivers/

            Then I suggest that you start reading
            http://yangman.ca/blog/2009/10/linux...ack-explained/ (very simple explanation, slightly outdated)
            http://blog.mecheye.net/2012/06/the-...raphics-stack/ (a bit more detailed)
            Thanks that was a good read. After all these years I finally understand it.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by blackout23 View Post
              After using Linux for about 4-5 year now I still don't fully understand how graphics stack actually work and what's up with Gallium, Mesa, KMS, DRI und DDX drivers etc.
              The foontnotes :
              KMS - Kernel ModeSetting = the way the correct resolution is set up for specific screens. (when you change resolution, this handles it at hardware level)
              Mesa - the (only) OSS implementation of OpenGL.
              Gallium - a sort of layer between graphic cards and a graphics API. The graphic driver only has to 'support' gallium3D.
              DRI - how software communicates with the hardware.

              But do read the links posted by chithanh.

              A comparison between open source AMD and catalyst might be interesting. Their open source drivers aren't that slow to begin with. They might beat the blob, when performance doubles.
              It's on its way. Michael gave us a useless preview. and BTW : nothing is stopping you from installing PTS and benchmarking yourself

              D3D9 for Gallium sounds really nice. Knowing the number of awesome games based on it, losing them would be a huge loss.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Mike Frett View Post
                It doesn't matter if it's on it's death-bed. They're lots of D3D9 Games that people could play, remember even win98 has DX9 support. That's a lot of Games for people to play, fun games, unlike most redundant cash-grab garbage today.
                Win98 only supports DirectX 8.1.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Vim_User View Post
                  Win98 only supports DirectX 8.1.
                  It does indeed support DirectX 9.0c:

                  http://www.microsoft.com/en-US/downl....aspx?id=34429

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Mike Frett View Post
                    It doesn't matter if it's on it's death-bed. They're lots of D3D9 Games that people could play, remember even win98 has DX9 support. That's a lot of Games for people to play, fun games, unlike most redundant cash-grab garbage today.
                    Majority of games right now support a minimum of DX9 level graphics. Any games being made in the future I hope will have Linux support. Would like to see how Gabe Newell's Steam Box might change developers minds to start supporting Linux.

                    Right now a lot of people, including myself, don't use Linux because too many games run piss slow. I have a Linux machine sitting on the side, to see how the Linux world is doing. A 100% speed up of DX9 games would certainly make me want to install Linux as a primary OS on my PC. I personally couldn't care about DX10/DX11 at the moment.

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                    • #25
                      DX9 for proprietary drivers

                      Is there patent problems about DirectX ?

                      If not, and as most of the proprietary driver code is shared between operating systems, Nvidia and AMD just need to "enable it" for Linux builds ?

                      If the patch gets accepted by Wine and Mesa, and people begin to use it, it might be worth it for NVidia to enable it in their binary blob.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Congelli501 View Post
                        Is there patent problems about DirectX ?

                        If not, and as most of the proprietary driver code is shared between operating systems, Nvidia and AMD just need to "enable it" for Linux builds ?
                        Direct3D is not shipped by GPU manufacturers but by Microsoft. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DirectX#Compatibility

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Congelli501 View Post
                          Is there patent problems about DirectX ?

                          If not, and as most of the proprietary driver code is shared between operating systems, Nvidia and AMD just need to "enable it" for Linux builds ?

                          If the patch gets accepted by Wine and Mesa, and people begin to use it, it might be worth it for NVidia to enable it in their binary blob.
                          Don't confuse Direct3D with DirectX. DirectX is much more.

                          DirectX 11 actually sounds more like it is something for Linux.

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                          • #28
                            Is a great year to be using open source drivers, a great year indeed.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by entropy View Post
                              It does indeed support DirectX 9.0c:

                              http://www.microsoft.com/en-US/downl....aspx?id=34429
                              I stand corrected.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Serafean View Post
                                The foontnotes :
                                KMS - Kernel ModeSetting = the way the correct resolution is set up for specific screens. (when you change resolution, this handles it at hardware level)
                                Mesa - the (only) OSS implementation of OpenGL.
                                Gallium - a sort of layer between graphic cards and a graphics API. The graphic driver only has to 'support' gallium3D.
                                DRI - how software communicates with the hardware.

                                But do read the links posted by chithanh.

                                It's on its way. Michael gave us a useless preview. and BTW : nothing is stopping you from installing PTS and benchmarking yourself

                                D3D9 for Gallium sounds really nice. Knowing the number of awesome games based on it, losing them would be a huge loss.
                                I'm using a GTX 580 in my rig. It would be really cool if NVIDIA could implement something like Gallium does in the blob and speed up Wine 2x. It would make pretty much everything playable in terms of performance. I tried wine with Diablo 3 once it it couldn't even keep a steady 60 FPS. It was going from 30-50 which feels pretty laggy. On Windows it would put out easily around 150 FPS.

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