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Gallium3D's LLVMpipe Driver Is Now Much Faster

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  • Gallium3D's LLVMpipe Driver Is Now Much Faster

    Phoronix: Gallium3D's LLVMpipe Driver Is Now Much Faster

    The Gallium3D LLVMpipe driver that's commonly used as the fallback software rasterizer on Linux desktop systems when no GPU hardware driver is present, is a heck of a lot faster with the current Mesa development code. The gains are surprising and quite remarkable.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=18638

  • #2
    as OpenGL isn't meant for running on a CPU.
    Can anyone predict how it will run on a parallela (the 64 core version)?

    http://www.adapteva.com/products/sil...vices/e64g401/
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...r-for-everyone

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    • #3
      Such results makes me wanting to see desktop environments related performance results (are KDE and Gnome tests gone with latest versions ?)

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      • #4
        I guess it's a step in the right direction. I'm actually kind of surprised the frame rates are so low. I remember when quad cores came out and the talk of raytraced scenes and software rendering seemed so promising...

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        • #5
          And we have a winner : 1.15 fps

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          • #6
            @Michael
            You can add that some ppl with not funds for better GPU's may use LLVMpipe for learning OpenGL versions not supported by their GPU's.

            For learning (which usually involve simpler gfx) LLVMpipe is quite nice. If only it had modern OpenGL support.

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            • #7
              It would be far more useful to see benchmarks of how well WMs run against weaker hardware.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by nightmarex View Post
                I guess it's a step in the right direction. I'm actually kind of surprised the frame rates are so low. I remember when quad cores came out and the talk of raytraced scenes and software rendering seemed so promising...
                The CPU he used for the benchmark is an hyper-threaded dual-core (= 4 threads), not a quad core.

                Desktop Celeron/Pentium: dual-core
                Desktop i3: dual-core + HT
                Desktop i5: quad-core
                Desktop i7: quad-core + HT, some hexa-core + HT

                On the mobile market, all the i3, i5 and i7s are hyperthreaded, all i5s are only dual core, some i7s are dual core (those without a "Q" or a "X" in their name).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by nightmarex View Post
                  I remember when quad cores came out and the talk of raytraced scenes and software rendering seemed so promising...
                  I remember reading that we would all have flying cars by now. That seemed really promising too

                  That said, the frame rates are pretty impressive (except for Nexuiz, of course). GPUs still have a *lot* more processing power than a typical CPU.
                  Last edited by bridgman; 04-14-2013, 10:57 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ChrisXY View Post
                    Can anyone predict how it will run on a parallela (the 64 core version)?

                    http://www.adapteva.com/products/sil...vices/e64g401/
                    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...r-for-everyone
                    If it worked then you could imagine a second attempt at the open graphics card project, with a much higher chance of producing something useful at a reasonable cost.

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                    • #11
                      That is truly impressive. It's too bad it didn't come sooner, since the cases where we've needed this are quickly dissolving. Still, it's awesome since it means we can largely dispense with 2D-only interfaces. I think 3D accelerated hardware has become increasingly common and cheap due to Android's prevalence in recent years. So if you have a computer that needs LLVMpipe as a driver, you probably aren't planning to do anything all that intensive to begin with.

                      In essence, the new crappy computer is the SoC, so you might as well replace your old Pentium with 256 MB of RAM with a Raspberry Pi. With Wayland & Mir allowing you to run multitudes more options on that hardware, the whole argument for using Linux on old PCs will seem much less important. Until then, however, let's see if we can get KDE running on a Raspi with this new driver.

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                      • #12
                        I'm guessing it was the "allow software drivers to do direct copies instead of emulating blits" commit. Just wondering why it wasn't noticed earlier.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Honton View Post
                          Better yet. GNOME. The better software drivers are more important for GNOME since they provide a uniform user interface. These performance gains pretty much obliterates all the "software drivers are useless" hearsay. Great news.
                          As a GNOME user and community member, I agree. I just wonder if the crazy stuff like blurs will ever be possible on this, since these games seem to be running well enough to watch. Also, it is intriguing to consider the concept of CPU-aided rendering. Like, you have a decent GPU, but your CPU is insanely overpowered, so you might as well use some of that processing power to push the graphics harder when your GPU is reaching its limit. Kind of like how we've been using GPUs for computational tasks, lately.

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                          • #14
                            I was amazed to see how much of a gain in performance this had, but then I noticed the frame rates were still pretty low.


                            It does get me to wonder though - perhaps the frame rate would double if the refresh rate were set to 30Hz. I get the impression that LLVM isn't limited so much by complex instructions but rather amount of instructions. While dropping the refresh rate can have little to no impact on a standard GPU, it might make all the difference for a CPU.

                            I also wonder if the AMD FX series would run better, since they use shorter pipelines and higher frequencies.

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                            • #15
                              It'd be nice if Michael would add Minecraft to the benchmarks. It'd be cool to see FPS above 50 on some hardware somewhere.

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