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  • Mesa's Rate Of Git Development Is Slowing

    Phoronix: Mesa's Rate Of Git Development Is Slowing

    Based upon the latest Git statistics, the rate of Mesa's development commits has been slowing down. There's also some other interesting numbers to share...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTEyNjI

  • #2
    Big fat "Phoronix" label that screws the image completely.
    Why not use a watermark (transparent) image instead.

    Comment


    • #3
      Isn't it caused just by cutting out old cruft and using more modern and simpler gallium architecture?

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      • #4
        Why is this happening?

        This is terrible. Why is this happening?
        Or is there something misleading here?

        Mesa needs more work than ever. We need OpenGL 4.2 compliance, proper power management and re-clocking support.

        Anything went wrong?
        Why aren't there more contributors?
        Why aren't the contributors more active?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          This is terrible. Why is this happening?
          Or is there something misleading here?

          Mesa needs more work than ever. We need OpenGL 4.2 compliance, proper power management and re-clocking support.

          Anything went wrong?
          Why aren't there more contributors?
          Why aren't the contributors more active?
          Simple: As any software reaches maturity, the number of corresponding changes decreases. I see nothing too surprising in that graph: You have a startup period, a rapid increase in development, and now you begin to see the slowdown that accompanies mostly-mature software projects.

          Then again, are you REALLY going to try and determine the "health" of software by the number of changes?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            Mesa needs more work than ever. We need OpenGL 4.2 compliance, proper power management and re-clocking support.
            Of the 3 things listed, only one of them should be done in the Mesa project. Power Management and Re-Clocking support should be handled in the kernel, not in a user-space 3D graphics library.

            As another poster mentioned, things are maturing, which means that a large amount of the needed code and refactoring has already been done. More features are still obviously needed, but now there's hard-to-find bugs which take a lot of time to diagnose, and often only take a few lines of changed code to fix. New extensions, GLSL versions, profiles, state trackers, new drivers, and other things will still require additional new code, but hopefully the Gallium3D architecture will reduce the amount of new code required for new drivers and state trackers.

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            • #7
              Is Valve looking for people to contribute to Mesa directly?

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              • #8
                Contribute

                Could not find a roadmap.

                But if you want to contribute:
                http://www.mesa3d.org/helpwanted.html
                Join mailing list: http://www.mesa3d.org/lists.html
                Read OpenGL documentation: http://www.opengl.org/documentation/

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                • #9
                  I haven't seen commits from Marek Olsak lately :\
                  I hope he's working on something major (maybe Southern Islands support).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hey Michael,

                    I would like to see an article about the current status of the Gallium3D framework. I do not mean benchmarks. I mean commentary from the developers from radeon, nouveaou, and vmware. Also I would like read an in depth analysis of the architectual differencies between the classic and the gallium drivers.

                    Gallium3D promissed a lot. Has it delivered? Have we reached the reuse greatness? What are the drawbacks? etc.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      As a Developer, Gallium looks far more attractive then MESA. Having one unified standard for N number of API's is frankly every OS should have done a VERY long time ago.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                        Could not find a roadmap.

                        But if you want to contribute:
                        http://www.mesa3d.org/helpwanted.html
                        Join mailing list: http://www.mesa3d.org/lists.html
                        Read OpenGL documentation: http://www.opengl.org/documentation/
                        it seems like a good and logical thing to start adverting at least this "help wanted" message in public areas where outsiders can actually read and perhaps get incentive to actually do something with it, so reproduced here for convenience.

                        for sure this is the first time iv ever realized it even existed.
                        http://www.mesa3d.org/helpwanted.html

                        "Help Wanted / To-Do List

                        We can always use more help with the Mesa project. Here are some specific ideas and areas where help would be appreciated:

                        Driver patching and testing. Patches are often posted to the mesa3d-dev mailing list, but aren't immediately checked into git because not enough people are testing them. Just applying patches, testing and reporting back is helpful.
                        Driver debugging. There are plenty of open bugs in the bug database.

                        Remove aliasing warnings. Enable gcc -Wstrict-aliasing=2 -fstrict-aliasing and track down aliasing issues in the code.
                        Windows driver building, testing and maintenance. The Visual Studio project files aren't always updated in a timely manner when new source files are added or old ones are removed. Fixing these tends to delay new Mesa releases.
                        Maintenance and testing of lesser-used drivers. Drivers such as DOS/DJGPP, GGI, etc that aren't being maintained are being deprecated starting in Mesa 7.3.
                        Contribute more tests to glean.

                        Automatic testing. It would be great if someone would set up an automated system for grabbing the latest Mesa code and run tests (such as glean) then report issues to the mailing list.
                        If you want to do something new in Mesa, first join the Mesa developer's mailing list. Then post a message to propose what you want to do, just to make sure there's no issues.

                        Anyone is welcome to contribute code to the Mesa project. By doing so, it's assumed that you agree to the code's licensing terms.
                        Finally:

                        Try to write high-quality code that follows the existing style.
                        Use uniform indentation, write comments, use meaningful identifiers, etc.
                        Test your code thoroughly. Include test programs if appropriate."

                        you should probably also add/emphasise routinely benchmark your changes and publicly post your results, write and add to a new and comprehensive test suite to automate testing for correctness, auto bench marking and auto reporting of these results to a single central location these and other changes in the future
                        Last edited by popper; 06-25-2012, 03:52 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Maintenance and testing of lesser-used drivers. Drivers such as DOS/DJGPP, GGI, etc that aren't being maintained are being deprecated starting in Mesa 7.3.
                          So...even if the driver works 100% (which I can't say one way or the other), if there aren't any updates, it gets depriciated?

                          Am I the only person who realizes how idiotic that is?

                          Also, the fact MESA needs so many drivers for different architectures is why I hope Gallium replaces it. One interface, one backend.

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                          • #14
                            Probably devs taking well-deserved vacations, or planning their next moves.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by WorBlux View Post
                              or planning their next moves.
                              I would think more than planning. In mainline mesa there seem to be only features that actually work. Maybe for some few days something breaks, but mostly mainline mesa git is extremely well usable. So I think the unstable development is probably in different branches or maybe even local repositories and gets pushed to master as soon as it is ready.

                              I have not looked at the article very well, but I think it only counts the commits to master and not to other branches.

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