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Gallium3D Clover Can Now Execute OpenCL Native Kernels

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  • #16
    Originally posted by plonoma View Post
    It would be wonderful if linux could have a FLOSS OpenCL implementation for CPU's.
    doesn't this beat the purpose of OpenCL???

    except if at some point we get CPUs that are so fast that we don't need special graphic chips.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Veerappan View Post
      Yeah. Case in point would be AMD. Their r600/r700 chips were mostly 5-wide vector units, but the Cayman chips have moved to 4-wide vector units. The next architecture is supposedly going to be SIMD-based, which will lead to entirely different optimization strategies (possibly similar to Fermi, but we'll see).
      One point I don't see mentioned much - current architectures are VLIW *and* SIMD.

      The SIMDs are 16-wide on high end chips and 4- or 8-wide on lower end chips.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by bridgman View Post
        One point I don't see mentioned much - current architectures are VLIW *and* SIMD.

        The SIMDs are 16-wide on high end chips and 4- or 8-wide on lower end chips.
        Thanks for the clarification. The VLIW part is going away in the next architecture, right? At least that's what the recent presentations that I've read (e.g. Anandtech) have all stated.
        Last edited by Veerappan; 06-22-2011, 05:22 PM.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by plonoma View Post
          It would be wonderful if linux could have a FLOSS OpenCL implementation for CPU's.

          Hopefully this project could become part of the kernel in the future?

          Really looking forward to being able to use OpenCL on Linux.
          Seoul National University / Samsung OpenCL run-time:
          http://opencl.snu.ac.kr/

          License: LGPL v3
          Supports: ARM, DSPs (TI) and Cell SPUs

          Uses LLVM and Clang, and they've got future plans for x86 support. It builds on x86_64, but I haven't gotten more than a simple hello world program to link, and the hello world program explicitly tells me that my CPU model is unsupported currently (phenom ii x6 1055t).

          I'm not saying that it's feature complete or that it's perfect, but I've heard from people who've used it on ARM and it does the trick. Given that it's LGPL, I don't see any license issues with using it on Linux.

          I don't see it going into the kernel (it is something that should probably remain in user-space as a library), but it might be something that could be included in distributions in the future after some further testing/porting.

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