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Gallium3D's LLVMpipe Is Speeding Up

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  • #16
    Originally posted by agd5f View Post
    Most computers are sold via OEMs. The way to get better open source support for particular hardware is to convince your OEM (HP, Dell, Lenovo, etc.) that's it's important to you. The OEMs then work with their vendors (AMD, Intel, Broadcom, etc.) when designing systems.
    agd5f, I have built around 30 PCs. Almost all for free, for my friends. I have purchased the parts. Nothing from OEM. Every time I install windows, I register it, so microsoft knows what I use. Microsoft also gathers Serial Numbers from hardware - this is good proof the hardware is using windows.

    What do companies do to get information if their products are used in linux? Nothing.

    OEM are limiting the choices.
    In cases of huge contract, the preinstalled operating system is selected by purchaser ANYWAYS.
    In case of normal private purchase, the operating system is reinstalled in 50% cases because of massive ad garbage. There is no reason to motivate OEM.
    Manufacturers should get info where their products are used and care about own drivers. Linux is not a hobby anymore.

    This and stricter more organized control (as in modularity, transparency and adherence to roadmap) over Xorg, Kernel and GCC may save Linux from becoming garbage polluted, overpatched, backdoor hobby project unsupported by many.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by crazycheese View Post
      agd5f, I have built around 30 PCs. Almost all for free, for my friends. I have purchased the parts. Nothing from OEM.
      In most cases you didn't buy the parts directly from the chip maker. You bought a motherboard from ASUS or Gigabyte who in turn bought the chips on board from the actual chip makers. You bought a video card from HIS or Sapphire or xfx, etc. In your case, those are the OEMs for your systems. Those OEMs buy parts from chip makers and are the ones who influence what kinds of support or features they would like. Most likely broadcom released an open source driver due to requests from OEMs who were buying their chips. Like it or not, OEMs buy the vast majority of chips produced and have a lot of influence.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by agd5f View Post
        You bought a motherboard from ASUS or Gigabyte who in turn bought the chips on board from the actual chip makers.
        Sorry, you mean THAT OEMs. In that case yes.
        I've been reaching skies on GPUs here, talking with Gigabyte about their inclosed in .EXE BIOSen(no more gigabyte for me), RMAing two already opened AIO printers from Kodak for not supporting linux and purchasing two HP instead. Apart from this, everything else works.

        But I would be HIGHLY thankfull if AMD provides the way for me to report cards that I purchase as using opensource driver and demanding opensource development. By THEM.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by elanthis View Post
          How about benchmarks on lower end CPUs? The people without usable GPUs/drivers probably don't have i7's.
          Don't be fooled by that i7. It's a mobile part with about the same performance as an Athlon II X4.

          PS: I agree with those that say that the quality of the benchmark articles of Phoronix is very far from what we can see on Anandtech or other similar sites. I would gladly pay the premium subscription if this was more like any of those, but more linux oriented; although I do understand that there's just so much a single person can do, so it's obvious that some things have to suffer in this case.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by devius View Post
            PS: I agree with those that say that the quality of the benchmark articles of Phoronix is very far from what we can see on Anandtech or other similar sites. I would gladly pay the premium subscription if this was more like any of those, but more linux oriented; although I do understand that there's just so much a single person can do, so it's obvious that some things have to suffer in this case.
            Yep, sites like Anandtech and Ars have big staffs while Phoronix is a one man show. So i can understand why Michael doesn't have the time to make it any better. But that's clearly a big differentiation between the sites.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by devius View Post
              Don't be fooled by that i7. It's a mobile part with about the same performance as an Athlon II X4.
              People with an Athlon II X4 are just as unlikely to lack a video chipset that's unsupported by the current FOSS drivers.

              So far as I can tell, there are three groups of people with an interest in llvmpipe. (1) People with newer technology the FOSS drivers haven't caught up to yet, mostly ATI customers; the ATI driver lag time is shrinking and looking fairly good right now for basic 3D accel. (2) People with ancient hardware by defunct manufacturers that don't want to pay $50 for modern-ish AGP card; screw 'em, these be computers, keep up or shut up. (3) People with oddball hardware, mostly netbooks and tablets and the like, that come with video chipsets not designed or supported by one of the Big Three; usually very weak CPUs on these puppies.

              From what I've seen, the biggest group of people wanting/needing something like llvmpipe were the ATI customers with r600/r700/r800 parts. r600/r700 is pretty solid these days, and r800 is wrapping up, and will probably be ready to go around the time the 3D desktops are more than just an upcoming plan.

              I am totally ready to be told I've gotten it all wrong here, though.

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              • #22
                Nvidia

                Originally posted by elanthis View Post
                From what I've seen, the biggest group of people wanting/needing something like llvmpipe were the ATI customers with r600/r700/r800 parts. r600/r700 is pretty solid these days, and r800 is wrapping up, and will probably be ready to go around the time the 3D desktops are more than just an upcoming plan.

                I am totally ready to be told I've gotten it all wrong here, though.
                You're forgetting nouveau users. The lag time on new hardware support is unlikely to get much better while NVidia keeps the specs private, and even a lot of older hardware can be buggy. Most people who need 3D support will just go with the binary drivers if nouveau isn't cutting it, but some might want to experiment with llvmpipe instead.

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                • #23
                  Nice. I would like to see a CPU usage of all cores/threads, to see how well it paralellizes now (I know some time ago there were scalability testes of llvmpipe by enabling only some cores on CPU). I would guess that 500-600% load level will mean that llvmpipe essentially uses cpu perfectly.

                  If you have sandybridge still on desk, how about testing llvmpipe on it?

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