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Reworking OpenGL ES In Mesa, Gallium3D

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  • Reworking OpenGL ES In Mesa, Gallium3D

    Phoronix: Reworking OpenGL ES In Mesa, Gallium3D

    In May of last year there were Gallium3D state trackers published for OpenGL ES 1.1 and OpenGL ES 2.0. These were among the first major working state trackers for this new graphics architecture, but in the months since they have continued to receive much affection from a few developers and continue to improve. The OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0 support though may now be reworked by Kristian Høgsberg...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODE0Ng

  • #2
    Galllium3D = TheNeverEverEndingRefactoring3D

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    • #3
      modernizing the linux graphics stack had been neglected for far too long. Now you see the refactoring that had been needed for the past 6 years happening in two.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by rohcQaH View Post
        modernizing the linux graphics stack had been neglected for far too long. Now you see the refactoring that had been needed for the past 6 years happening in two.
        not so much in two. It will be more like 6+ years more... by which time it will once again be obsolete.

        Will have to forgive my skepticism that this will ever amount to much until I see working 3d using gallium on ANYTHING.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by _txf_ View Post
          until I see working 3d using gallium on ANYTHING.
          there already is, open your eyes.

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          • #6
            yup, been using it for a few weeks already on my ati card.

            a big improvement over classic mesa.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by yoshi314 View Post
              yup, been using it for a few weeks already on my ati card.

              a big improvement over classic mesa.
              In what way? Performance or features?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by _txf_ View Post
                In what way? Performance or features?
                Afaik both.

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                • #9
                  What exactly is GLES good for? Currently I have it disabled when building. Is it used for something?

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                  • #10
                    GL ES is a slightly different API (GL ES 2.0 is not quite GL 2) that is a better match with older and low end hardware, and which has a simpler API. It also includes EGL, which is a standard way of setting up things like surfaces etc.. and is portable across Windows, X, embedded systems etc...

                    You don't need it for anything right now AFAIK, but it seems likely that an increasing number of tools and apps will be written to the GL ES 2.0 API rather than a regular GL version. I believe the latest changes to GL ES allow the GL ES and GL APIs to co-exist, which is handy.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by bridgman View Post
                      You don't need it for anything right now AFAIK, but it seems likely that an increasing number of tools and apps will be written to the GL ES 2.0 API rather than a regular GL version. I believe the latest changes to GL ES allow the GL ES and GL APIs to co-exist, which is handy.
                      It's semi-required by browsers for the new WebGL API. You can emulate OpenGL ES over OpenGL, although the shading languages are slightly different so it's just a lot easier to have a proper OpenGL ES implementation. The shading language for ES was a little different than regular GLSL, in particular, and I don't think they aligned until GLSL 1.40 or so which Mesa doesn't yet support.

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                      • #12
                        Yeah, good point. Some browsers require GL ES for WebGL, others implement it over regular GL, but the trend seems to be towards pushing the work down into the driver stack.

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