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Gallium3D Support For Haiku Operating System

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  • #31
    You guys are so jumping the bandwagon. Can't you just stick to linux?

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    • #32
      Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
      Ubuntu is supposed to be the slick, stripped down Linux distro and it runs like shit on a pentium3. Now if I would turn all these features of, then I would not get all the advantages of Linux...
      wait... what?

      antix is a sleek/stripped down linux, puppy is, DSL is, arch can be.. there are many more, but ubuntu is NOT one of them.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by sundown View Post
        You guys are so jumping the bandwagon. Can't you just stick to linux?
        Why not Linux AND Haiku?

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        • #34
          Originally posted by philcostin View Post
          Why not Linux AND Haiku?
          Because I don't want the new kid on the block to take all the fruits earned by linux in all those past hard fought years just like that.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by sundown View Post
            Because I don't want the new kid on the block to take all the fruits earned by linux in all those past hard fought years just like that.
            I can understand why you might feel that way, because I did too. But I eventually realized that Haiku has the opportunity to shine where Linux doesn't. It is a different thing entirely. Linux is a kernel and when placed with a set of utilities, makes a great operating system. Unfortunately, I have learned very well that people who do not care about computers will never see things the way we do. They see computers as an appliance. You switch it on, expect some kind of "customer service" and switch it off again. They simply do not care about the computer and view it entirely as a tool, much in the same way we do not care about.. maybe a bus. However, I learned that it is not fair to blame those people just because they are not interested enough to switch to Linux. Free and open source software developers do not owe those people anything at all. So, if some developers choose to implement another system, you should not see it as a threat to Linux. Haiku was never intended to threaten Linux or BSD. It does however, (I believe) become a much easier to understand concept for those people that really do not care about computers, but just want to get the job done (pretty much in the way Ubuntu has succeeded, and is succeeding as a distribution).

            I will continue to use Linux for a very long time, along with NetBSD, FreeBSD, Solaris and Haiku.

            Linux will never die out simply due to the fact that people who do not care about computers will not nprmally choose to install it. However, Haiku can certainly thrive in that area... and why shouldn't it?

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            • #36
              Originally posted by sundown View Post
              Because I don't want the new kid on the block to take all the fruits earned by linux in all those past hard fought years just like that.
              As long as it is a free OS, it should have the absolute support of the opensource community.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by philcostin View Post
                I can understand why you might feel that way, because I did too. But I eventually realized that Haiku has the opportunity to shine where Linux doesn't. It is a different thing entirely. Linux is a kernel and when placed with a set of utilities, makes a great operating system. Unfortunately, I have learned very well that people who do not care about computers will never see things the way we do. They see computers as an appliance. You switch it on, expect some kind of "customer service" and switch it off again. They simply do not care about the computer and view it entirely as a tool, much in the same way we do not care about.. maybe a bus. However, I learned that it is not fair to blame those people just because they are not interested enough to switch to Linux. Free and open source software developers do not owe those people anything at all. So, if some developers choose to implement another system, you should not see it as a threat to Linux. Haiku was never intended to threaten Linux or BSD. It does however, (I believe) become a much easier to understand concept for those people that really do not care about computers, but just want to get the job done (pretty much in the way Ubuntu has succeeded, and is succeeding as a distribution).

                I will continue to use Linux for a very long time, along with NetBSD, FreeBSD, Solaris and Haiku.

                Linux will never die out simply due to the fact that people who do not care about computers will not nprmally choose to install it. However, Haiku can certainly thrive in that area... and why shouldn't it?
                I totally agree with that.
                It's almost exactly what I think.

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                • #38
                  What I never understood about Haiku and other, similar projects is: Why do they not use the Linux kernel?

                  Even the BSDs have serious trouble keeping up with the DRM driver development, and I expect Haiku to be in an even worse position. Seriously, writing drivers for all hardware out there, taking into account all the quirks that might exist, and so on, is a lot of work. Why do those people not build on the massive amount of work that already goes into the Linux kernel to solve that exact problem?

                  Obviously, Haiku has a very different philosophy from Linux which means that it might need Haiku-specific kernel extensions and so on, but with Git those could easily be maintained in a Haiku-tree essentially forever if Linus doesn't want to merge them into his tree.

                  Your users do not care about the underlying kernel, as long as it works. What they do care about is applications and (for developers) development frameworks. So if you're serious about creating a kick-ass replacement operating system, *userspace* is what you should focus on.

                  Trying to reimplement all those hardware drivers is just an amazingly dumb waste of time.

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                  • #39
                    Afaik the reason why they have their own kernel is that they're reimplementing BeOS which was at a time apparently quite a popular operating system and its kernel was as far as I've understood quite different from what Linux is. Whether or not all of this makes sense or not, I've no idea. I don't personally think people should be forbidden for having whatever software development hobbies they want. After all, in sports terms, it'd be a bit like people lobbying for banning American football because we could just all play soccer.

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                    • #40
                      Obviously people can hack on whatever the hell they want - hey, I also started writing my own kernel once. It's just that the Haiku people seem to care about the desktop more than anything, so it seems a bit odd that they would voluntarily waste their time in kernel land. But maybe that's just me

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                      • #41
                        They say they want compatibity with every application that already exists for BeOS, but these applications are few and old, for example Opera for BeOS it's in 3.6.2 version and Abiword in 0.7. So I don't think this is a big deal...
                        Maybe they have some special plans for the desktop things of Haiku and the Linux kernel limits them.

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                        • #42
                          If they want to build their own kernel, great! No need to limit ourselves to "one kernel to rule them all". Probably has a lot to do with licensing, freedom and people wanting to work on their own kernels.

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                          • #43
                            More like "if they have enough manpower, fine". As long as they don't expect Linux coders to start implementing them drivers, I don't see anything wrong with it.

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                            • #44
                              *scratches head*

                              I have to say, Linux guys come across as a strange bunch sometimes. When for example there are mutliple confusingly-similar, but different, implementations of <Tool X> - none of which are optimal, by the way - they love to bang on about the Freedom (and don't forget to capitalise it, by God). And it's almost as if the freedom to choose between this multitude of equally-flawed creations makes up for the fact that none of them are actually correct. Seems silly to me. But, I digress.
                              My point is that as soon as anyone tries to usefully depart from linux and create a slick desktop experience (and it might even be usable by non-C experts ) they're denigrated for wasting everyone's resources.

                              One possible reason for the existence of Haiku? "Not everyone thinks linux is perfect."

                              But, I'm just guessing.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Wingfeather View Post
                                *scratches head*

                                I have to say, Linux guys come across as a strange bunch sometimes. When for example there are mutliple confusingly-similar, but different, implementations of <Tool X> - none of which are optimal, by the way - they love to bang on about the Freedom (and don't forget to capitalise it, by God). And it's almost as if the freedom to choose between this multitude of equally-flawed creations makes up for the fact that none of them are actually correct. Seems silly to me. But, I digress.
                                My point is that as soon as anyone tries to usefully depart from linux and create a slick desktop experience (and it might even be usable by non-C experts ) they're denigrated for wasting everyone's resources.

                                One possible reason for the existence of Haiku? "Not everyone thinks linux is perfect."

                                But, I'm just guessing.
                                I am with you on that 100%. I will not dump Linux though, but Haiku might just be the ultimate FLOSS desktop out there. Instead of playing catching up, which they appearently don't seem to be trying to do, Haiku needs to be a platform on it's own that can amuse users; it needs to have some extra value that will make people think "Hey that's better! Cool I want that!" instead of "Now I can finaly dump Windows eXperience Pain!".

                                ... if you know what I mean

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