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  • NVIDIA To Publicly Release Some Documentation

    Phoronix: NVIDIA To Publicly Release Some Documentation

    NVIDIA will be releasing 2D (and potentially 3D) documentation concerning their ARM Tegra graphics core. "NVIDIA committed to open-source" even read one slide during a presentation at the annual X.Org Developers' Conference...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTE5MDk

  • #2
    Now, I have seen everything!

    Comment


    • #3
      This is a nice start, but they're seriously putting an NDA on this guy? That's almost as much a dick move as intentionally not giving out any documentation at all. What's the point of letting something be open source if the guy needs to keep his work to himself? How does nvidia expect this 1 guy to get anything done? I'm sorry if I missed something and if I am speaking on ignorance, I just think an NDA is uncalled for.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Phoronix
        Times look to be changing.
        I find it difficult to come to this conclusion from what you wrote.
        Only Tegra docs under NDA - and apparently largely incomplete - sounds not too promising.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
          This is a nice start, but they're seriously putting an NDA on this guy? That's almost as much a dick move as intentionally not giving out any documentation at all. What's the point of letting something be open source if the guy needs to keep his work to himself? How does nvidia expect this 1 guy to get anything done? I'm sorry if I missed something and if I am speaking on ignorance, I just think an NDA is uncalled for.
          Remember, this is the same company that gave us the 'nv' DDX.
          Truly committed to open source I'd say.

          Comment


          • #6
            Babysteps but at least its a start.

            I was like "WOW desktop cards" but then i realized it was for tegra.

            Anyway as i said its a start.

            Comment


            • #7
              Microsoft is way more committed to Open Source than Nvidia, and this joke of a half ass attempt at PR shows just how much respect Nvidia as for us in the OSS community.

              All I can say is Fuck You Nvidia!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by entropy View Post
                I find it difficult to come to this conclusion from what you wrote.
                Only Tegra docs under NDA - and apparently largely incomplete - sounds not too promising.
                Originally posted by entropy View Post
                I find it difficult to come to this conclusion from what you wrote.
                Only Tegra docs under NDA - and apparently largely incomplete - sounds not too promising.
                From the article:
                ... the next version of the Tegra TRM (Technical Reference Manual) should provide the public with this (NDA-free) documentation covering the 2D engine.

                NOTE: NDA-free.

                He has previously been under NDA for Tegra documentation, but Nvidia is about to release some of it NDA-free. This is a good thing.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Veerappan View Post
                  From the article:
                  ... the next version of the Tegra TRM (Technical Reference Manual) should provide the public with this (NDA-free) documentation covering the 2D engine.

                  NOTE: NDA-free.

                  He has previously been under NDA for Tegra documentation, but Nvidia is about to release some of it NDA-free. This is a good thing.
                  Sorry, that was obviously wrong.
                  I messed it up while editing that line. :/
                  I wanted to express my disappointment about the docs covering
                  Tegra only and only a rather tiny fraction of the chip capabilities.

                  I agree it is a good thing, in terms of "not a bad thing",
                  but it really doesn't sound too promising to me.
                  Why don't they release more complete docs?
                  And why do they refuse to do the same for the desktop asics?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    they are not committed

                    I applied to be a developer on the Tegra zone three months ago. Never got a response, at all.

                    Then I searched on XDA and contacted a few people, and a couple nice guys provided me with the Tegra 2 TRM as well as the just released Tegra 3 TRM.

                    I can confirm there is no useful information on the 3D part at all, just a very high level description of the block. No description of registers, nothing.

                    Having the TRM is one thing, and it's nice to know the meaning of a few registers being used in the Tegra branch of the Linux kernel. However it is still very far from being open. Why doesn't Nvidia directly publish their TRM? There is exactly ZERO sensitive piece of information in it, it just describes how to interface with their SoC, and the juicy 3D part is not available.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Linus, thank you

                      Thank you!

                      (I know, it's only a start. The Wright Brothers did not fly on a rocket, you know. They flew at like 1 MPH. Gotta start somewhere.)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        They are only doing this for free community work, they KNOW everyone wants the Desktop GPU docs, this is just teasing.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Lemonzest View Post
                          They are only doing this for free community work
                          I'm ok with that.

                          It makes sense that after a certain period of time, ________________________ corporation will stop supporting their products. That's entirely natural. If I had my own company, I wouldn't perpetually support it either. Be it 2 years, 5 years, 10 years, at some point it has to end.

                          By having the documents, we can support it ourselves and provide our own support. Yes, __________________ corporation makes the product and sells it to us, and for a period of years they provide the primary support. But after that we don't have to be locked into them. We are empowered. We can keep going.

                          We don't have to buy another product just because they say we have to. The product we own right now works perfectly fine, and I intend to keep using it. Let's put it into numbers. Let's say that _________________________ corporation provides 4 years in-house support. The community might then support it for the next 4 years.

                          8 years of support for a product I invest in? Sign me up!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by halfmanhalfamazing View Post
                            The community might then support it for the next 4 years.
                            community support isn't good. you are left up to a dev to decide what he wants to work on, and when you complain you get told to do it yourself. You have a bunch of people that want to work on features, but no one wants to work on the boring bugs.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Community support is better than no support.

                              Besides, it depends on how you define community. See:

                              http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...tem&px=MTA3ODc
                              http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...tem&px=MTAyMzU

                              In both instances I'm referring to R200. For anybody who may not know, this is 10+ year old hardware - debut 2001. (and see the discussions too, people still use these)

                              Community doesn't exclusively mean individuals anymore. If a 3rd party corporation sees a need to fix said bugs, they will be fixed. But this can only happen if the docs are released.

                              I am more than happy with 10 years of support. In fact, I encourage it!(for popular hardware, anyways. Which these were indeed popular) I can't tell you how happy it makes me to see guys like Marek running around here.

                              If I ran my own company like this, I probably wouldn't release docs for my newest generation, maybe the newest two. But in the context of nVidia there really isn't any reason for them to keep the docs for 3-5 year hardware under lock and key anymore. I'd bet AMD has something more advanced than GeForce 7s/8s. At this point, they're only pissing off their customers who are more than willing to provide their own support. It's bad customer support to not release the docs.

                              Nouveau is a testament to the fact that a) Linus was right with his FU nVidia and b) We are going to support ourselves anyways. They might as well just release the docs, and it appears that that message is sinking in.

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