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Linux 3.12 Brings Big AMD Radeon Improvements

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  • #11
    Originally posted by theghost View Post
    These are definitely great improvements.
    Would be interesting to see a direct comparison against fglrx.
    And please with some contemporary games. No one care this games.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by przemoli View Post
      How can I run this exact test suite on my machine?

      I think it would be the following:
      phoronix-test-suite benchmark 1310099-SO-RADEONRV716

      If you ever want more information about the system that a test was run on, or how openbenchmarking got the numbers that created a graph, click on the little white/blue cube icon on the lower left of a graph. It'll take you to the page that the result set is hosted at, and there's information at the bottom of the page about how to recreate the result... You'll need to install the phoronix-test-suite first (either through downloading manually or through your package manager).

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      • #13
        Originally posted by rvdboom View Post
        Impressive. I seem to remember that radeon was not that far away of Catalyst, this could bring it on par or even ahead, at least on the tested benchmarks.
        So two questions for the AMD devs :

        - What's in the 3.12 kernel that brings such a large performance increase?
        - Is this increase supposed to occur on the whole Radeon range of cards or was Michael just (un)lucky to pick the one that sees the best results?
        The blit change I believe was this commit:
        http://cgit.freedesktop.org/~agd5f/l...8663386498aafa

        It seems to support any card that uses r600g (or at least a lot of them), but I don't see any mention of SI... whether that's because it's unnecessary (already implemented), not applicable to SI, not done in this commit, or just not done is another question.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Veerappan View Post
          The blit change I believe was this commit:
          http://cgit.freedesktop.org/~agd5f/l...8663386498aafa

          It seems to support any card that uses r600g (or at least a lot of them), but I don't see any mention of SI... whether that's because it's unnecessary (already implemented), not applicable to SI, not done in this commit, or just not done is another question.
          The only asic that commit affects is r6xx chips. R7xx and newer are not affected since they use the async dma rings for bo moves and have since kernel 3.8 or so. The only time the new cpdma code would come into effect for newer chips is when you run the kernel bo tests. TBH, I don't know of any particular changes that would have had much impact on performance.

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          • #15
            Heres how you do it.


            Get an AMD-7850 = New popular upper-mid range card, good value to performance to wattage

            Test1: Windows8-Catalyst VS Ubuntu-Catalyst with the latest everything closed on DOTA2 / TF2 / Counter Strike Source / Trine 2 @ 1080p

            Test2: Ubuntu-FOSS VS Ubuntu-Catalyst with the latest everything open v closed on DOTA2 / TF2 / Counter Strike Source / Trine 2 @ 1080p


            Make a clear graph of FPS one next to the other so we can see the general performance index of Windows Vs Linux on closed and then Linux VS Linux on Open.

            Nice and easy to read so new to linux non technical gamers can understand just how close they can be to moving to Linux and how much there going to lose overal vs Windows. We already know Nvidia's closed are identical to windows 8 so what we want to know now is how close are AMD coming to getting equal performance results in games with Ubuntu steam and SteamOS around the corner.

            I.E are those who want to ditch windows able to do so on AMD or should they Go Nvidia seen as Valve is siding their builds with team green due to drivers.

            Have AMD + the new Kernal Made it a level playing field or close to it ?


            Thanks

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            • #16
              What happened to all of the performance improvements in 3.11? There was a similar article a couple months ago showing how 3.11 stomped 3.10, and this article shows it doing worse.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by cbgoding View Post
                What happened to all of the performance improvements in 3.11? There was a similar article a couple months ago showing how 3.11 stomped 3.10, and this article shows it doing worse.
                That was as a result of re-clocking the GPU properly with the DPM changes. They had to be enabled manually in 3.11 but were going to be enabled by default in 3.12, AFAIK. So these improvements could simply be a result of DPM being turned on.

                A comparison against 3.11 with and without DPM would be useful to know if it's specifically a change in 3.12 or not.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by tom.higgy View Post
                  That was as a result of re-clocking the GPU properly with the DPM changes. They had to be enabled manually in 3.11 but were going to be enabled by default in 3.12, AFAIK. So these improvements could simply be a result of DPM being turned on.

                  A comparison against 3.11 with and without DPM would be useful to know if it's specifically a change in 3.12 or not.
                  3.12 does NOT turn DPM on by default. There were way too many changes in this kernel to consider the feature stable yet, but maybe 3.13 will do so. Also, the 4870 card michael is testing here is unlikely to get any performance benefit from it anyway - it's likely clocked high by default, and would just save power with DPM. It's the newer cards that tend to be clocked low by default and get big speedups - Radeon SI cards, Cayman, and the APU parts. And likely mobile as well.

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                  • #19
                    So, DPM is enabled by default in kernel 3.12? Its still not clear, because it says "Radeon HD 8000 "Sea Islands" Dynamic Power Management (DPM)", so, I think is the same support older gpu have since kernel 3.11, and that would mean its still not by default?

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                    • #20
                      compiling mesa from git

                      hi - sorry for being kind of offtopic... but I am in the mood to experiment. I have want to compile Mesa from git to see oss-radeon-driver improvements. Iīm already on kernel 3.11.3 but mesa is 9.2.1.

                      Is it enough to compile only MESA or do i also need DRM and radeon-DDX and there is also somethin caled DRI... so my problem is I donīt know which howto I should follow at best:

                      http://dri.freedesktop.org/wiki/Building/

                      http://www.x.org/wiki/radeonBuildHowTo/

                      or even http://www.reddit.com/r/linuxquestio...n_ubuntu_1210/ and adapting it to my opensuse 13.1 RC1

                      any hint much appreciated!

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