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AMD R300/R400 Radeon Gallium3D Finally Gets MSAA

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  • AMD R300/R400 Radeon Gallium3D Finally Gets MSAA

    Phoronix: AMD R300/R400 Radeon Gallium3D Finally Gets MSAA

    The AMD Radeon "R300" Gallium3D driver has finally enabled MSAA anti-aliasing support for the very old ATI R300 and R400 class graphics processors...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQ0Njg

  • #2
    Hey.. I am that one user..

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gQuigs View Post
      Hey.. I am that one user..
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxxQS5LJi9w

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      • #4
        Someone should update this: http://www.x.org/wiki/RadeonFeature/ (it's no longer editable).

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        • #5
          What's the point working at AMD if they cannot provide at least a few cards for testing?
          And don't tell me that those cards are too old...
          Also shouldn't they have a few testers at least?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by iznogood View Post
            What's the point working at AMD if they cannot provide at least a few cards for testing?
            And don't tell me that those cards are too old...
            Also shouldn't they have a few testers at least?
            Just guessing that it's because most of these guys work *FOR* AMD, not at AMD's actual offices and AMD, like every company prioritizes new or recent hardware.

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            • #7
              Also their warehouse isn't likely endless. Just a few years ago they couldn't even find Rage128 docs anymore, that doesn't bode well for finding actual cards.

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              • #8
                Not having actual cards is one thing - though actually I personally have a bunch of various cards (GPU, controllers, NIC, ...) ranging from old ISA, VLB, PCI, AGP to modern PCI. Most of them bought used on ebay when they were cheap. And they don't use that much space.
                But having lost the specs sounds ridiculous.
                Anyway happy to see some old boards receiving love.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Adarion View Post
                  Not having actual cards is one thing - though actually I personally have a bunch of various cards (GPU, controllers, NIC, ...) ranging from old ISA, VLB, PCI, AGP to modern PCI. Most of them bought used on ebay when they were cheap. And they don't use that much space.
                  But having lost the specs sounds ridiculous.
                  Anyway happy to see some old boards receiving love.
                  It's not that the specs are lost, it's generally that they've been moved off to tape or some other high latency storage medium that which makes them much harder to access. Couple that with the fact that most people internally are working on unreleased hardware or the current generation of hardware and it's not real easy to ask someone if they remember how some feature worked or where the docs are for an 8 year old (10 years old internally) chip. As for cards, I'm sure they are probably a few old cards around in various labs, but as I said before, most people aren't working on old stuff. Most of the open source developers work remotely so we can't just swing by the lab and dig around for some old card and you can't buy them new.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by agd5f View Post
                    ... tape or some other high latency storage medium...
                    Thanks, you just made my evening.


                    > most people aren't working on old stuff.

                    I guess so and that's also understandable, esp. with limited manpower. But maybe this is something also for freelancers to try to get into development to work on some older chips.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Adarion View Post
                      Thanks, you just made my evening.


                      > most people aren't working on old stuff.

                      I guess so and that's also understandable, esp. with limited manpower. But maybe this is something also for freelancers to try to get into development to work on some older chips.
                      This is a great opportunity for people who actually have those cards to test and report the results. It shouldn't be hard to switch it on and off for different parts, people just need to report whether or not it works for them.

                      If there aren't enough people out there to do that, then there's a very strong argument to be made that it's not important enough to waste anyone's time from AMD on it anyway.

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                      • #12
                        If someone is interested in contribute testing there is still Hyper-z to test and enable on R300/R400, see http://www.x.org/wiki/RadeonFeature/ .

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